Melissa Anderson

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For 364 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Melissa Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Ornithologist
Lowest review score: 0 Happy Tears
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 54 out of 364
364 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    If Side Effects, an immensely pleasurable thriller centering around psychotropic drugs, really is Steven Soderbergh's final big-screen film, as the director claims it will be, then he has peaked in the Valley of the Dolls.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Melissa Anderson
    As with most fam-cam documentaries, dysfunction pushes the story along, tipping over into exploitation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Melissa Anderson
    Guadagnino inserts a plot thread indicting Europe's response to the migrant crisis, shoehorning an issue of utmost gravity into a pulpy sex thriller. Not even this flamboyant project, however satisfying in its excesses otherwise, can accommodate the inept civics lesson.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Melissa Anderson
    The Wise Kids suffers from a theater workshop-y tendency to rest too long on pauses and silences to convey dramatic heft. But the blunder is ultimately overshadowed by Cone's excellent young actors, particularly Torem, burrowing deeply into her character's zealotry and anguish about being left behind.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Her (Davis) homage--tender, never hagiographic--also contains some biting analysis of the racism, both overt and insidious, that the artist was up against.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Recalling other cine-duets, both straight (Richard Linklater's Before Sunrise) and gay (Andrew Haigh's Weekend), Paris 05:59 distinguishes itself by seamlessly including a lesson on HIV post-exposure prophylaxis.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Tomboy astutely explores the freedom, however brief, of being untethered to the highly rule-bound world of gender codes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    In so shrewdly exploring the illusions — namely (self-) deception — required to keep a dyad functioning, Garrel shows just how much we all remain, consciously or not, in the dark.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Melissa Anderson
    Like its central not-couple, two women tongue-tied about their desire for each other, So Yong Kim's Lovesong frustrates with its lack of articulation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Melissa Anderson
    Even with her beatific face (the actress looks like one of Parmigianino's Madonnas), Farmiga is never wholly believable as a woman shaken by a crisis of belief.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Melissa Anderson
    Tellingly, it's not the queers, but a cop--Seymour Pine, the 90-year-old retired NYPD morals inspector who led the raid on the Stonewall Inn--who gets the last word.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    Rapisarda Casanova's film shows just how much natural splendor dominates the region, here caught at the height of estival glory.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Director Sean Baker, co-writing his fourth feature with Chris Bergoch, does some deft balancing of his own: His genuine admiration for these two women extends to their idiosyncrasies, yet they never become fools, whores, saints, or coots.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Melissa Anderson
    Despite From Afar's lumbering solemnity, Castro, a Chilean actor best known for his collaborations with compatriot Pablo Larraín, proves ever supple.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Reybaud’s film similarly serves as a tonic lesson in physical specifics, each location populated with richly idiosyncratic conversation partners.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Melissa Anderson
    Audiard himself might have benefited from a simple reminder of left from right; his rudderless film confuses a pileup of preposterous, sentimental scenarios with genuine emotion.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Stratman often juxtaposes static, serene landscape footage with an increasingly agitated soundtrack, arriving at an odd consonance amid so much dissonance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Jordenö, in a recurring motif, honors the kiki denizens the most when she captures them motionless, staring directly into the camera, regal and indefatigable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Melissa Anderson
    The savage derangements of grief so guttingly explored by Ozon in Under the Sand (2000), a career-revitalizing project for Charlotte Rampling, are decorously treated in Frantz.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    You Don't Like the Truth focuses on the pathetic manipulations of Canadian intelligence officers as they interrogate Toronto-born Omar Khadr, the youngest prisoner held in Guantánamo Bay.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Melissa Anderson
    As too often happens in nonfiction movies, their exploration of these concepts is undermined by ill-considered execution.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Melissa Anderson
    These horrors, and the absorbing performances of Watts and McGregor, will soon be undermined by a surfeit of sentiment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Crucially, the variety of interviewees in Hubbard's doc - men and women of different races and classes - underscores just how diverse ACT UP was in its heyday.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Melissa Anderson
    Despite the clumsy script and a shaky acting partner, Cattani, at least, is fascinating to watch, never demanding audience sympathy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    An unadorned, unsentimental portrait of a marriage, Yi Seung-jun's documentary Planet of Snail celebrates the daily life of an exceptionally collaborative couple.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Melissa Anderson
    Produced by his youngest daughter, Gina, this profile of Harry Belafonte, foregrounding the 84-year-old actor and singer's political activism, is a moving if occasionally wearying hagiography.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Cogitore's movie is at once otherworldly and firmly tethered to stark reality.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Though hewing to a too-conventional structure, Bowser's film is densely researched enough to yield insights not just into its overlooked subject, but also into his overly analyzed era.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Undeniably, the rhythms — of clanging machines, of humans at work and repose — seen and heard here are the tempo of the quotidian and the repetitive. Yet even in their mundanity, these factory routines are not without their exalted moments.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Formally spartan, Ousmane Sembène's Black Girl (1966) is dense with cool fury.

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