Melissa Anderson
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For 275 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 69% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Melissa Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Lowest review score: 0 The Blind Side
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 92 out of 275
  2. Negative: 42 out of 275
275 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Melissa Anderson
    Extraordinary, groundbreaking documentary.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Melissa Anderson
    When Guadagnino focuses solely on the primal, the effect is spellbinding. Only the words get in the way.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Melissa Anderson
    A perfectly paced and performed character study of a woman raising a child on her own who must contend with a heinous act of violence.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Melissa Anderson
    Unclassifiable, expansive, and breathtaking.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Melissa Anderson
    Plunging viewers into the thick of chaos, Leviathan explodes the antiquated paradigm of the documentary or ethnographic film, whose mission has traditionally been to educate or elucidate, to create something that seizes us, never letting us forget just how disordered the world is. This may be the greatest lesson any nonfiction film can teach us.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Melissa Anderson
    Stranger abounds with precision and detail, evinced not just in the spectacular visual composition but also in the observation of behavioral codes in carnally charged spaces.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    It's precisely Malle's omnivorous appetite that makes his first feature, adapted from a policier, so delectable, one stuffed with many sumptuous sights and sounds.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    Not to detract from the pleasure of watching the consistently excellent actors, who enhance the dialogue's bite with their body language, but the script of In the Loop is so rich that it could work as a radio play.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    35 Shots is Denis's warmest, most radiant work, honoring a family of two's extreme closeness while suggesting its potential for suffocation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    A triumph of maximalist filmmaking. And you won't look at your watch once.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    Nothing tops ILYPM's Jim Carrey ... in the most gloriously raunchy, unrepentant moment in the an(n)als of Hollywood A-listers doing gay-for-pay.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    His gift-and the film's-is to transform the seemingly banal relationship between pet and owner into something singular, inimitable, sacred.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    A simple, powerful act of bearing witness, We Were Here is a sober reminder of the not-too-distant past, when gays were focused not on honeymoon plans but on keeping people alive.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    Despite a few missteps, Take Shelter powerfully lays bare our national anxiety disorder - a pervasive dread that Curtis can define only as "something that's not right."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    Thoroughly researched and packed with phenomenal archival footage, it's a rousing tribute to a mesmerizing performer that forgoes blind hero worship.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    Millions of lives have been saved - and extended - as the result of a tireless cadre of advocates who, as Eigo states, "put their bodies on the line."
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    A transfixing Cold War thriller set in the East Germany of 1980, Christian Petzold's superb Barbara is made even more vivid by its subtle overlay of the golden-era "woman's picture," the woman in question being Dr. Barbara Wolff, brilliantly played by Nina Hoss in her fifth film with the writer-director.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    Sweetgrass reminds us of the stupefying magnificence of its setting—beautiful for spacious skies and mountain majesties—while never letting us forget its formidable perils.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Melissa Anderson
    Firmly rooted in everyday particulars — primarily the transactions (business, emotional, or otherwise) facilitated by the time- and space-obliterating devices to which we are constantly tethered — Ferran's movie dares to venture, for much of its second half, into fantasy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Without a trace of didacticism, Boden and Fleck portray the insidious details of exploitation and hollow American maxims.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Jerichow forgoes the prolonged double-crosses of "The Postman Always Rings Twice," its simpler ending made all the more powerful--and a little heartbreaking.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The Art of the Steal's thorough research, bolstered by many fiery talking heads, makes it one of the most successful advocacy docs in recent years and may prompt some firsthand investigating of your own.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The force of the acting alone almost compensates for some of the more difficult (and realistic) questions about not giving birth that García willfully sidesteps.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The Tillman Story goes deeper, exposing a system of arrogance and duplicity that no WikiLeak could ever fully capture.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Those who groan that the writer-director has made another indulgent film about the obscenely privileged have overlooked Coppola's redoubtable gifts at capturing milieu, languor, and exacting details.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Moves briskly, unfolding as one lively sit-down after another with artists, scholars, and curators who established themselves at the height of second-wave feminism.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The Interrupters reminds us of the powers and pleasures of well-crafted, immersive nonfiction filmmaking.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    You Don't Like the Truth focuses on the pathetic manipulations of Canadian intelligence officers as they interrogate Toronto-born Omar Khadr, the youngest prisoner held in Guantánamo Bay.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Tomboy astutely explores the freedom, however brief, of being untethered to the highly rule-bound world of gender codes.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The Artist is movie love at its most anodyne; where Guy Maddin has used the conventions of silent film to express his loony psychosexual fantasias for more than a decade, Hazanavicius sweetly asks that we not be afraid of the past.

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