Melissa Anderson
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For 280 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 28% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Melissa Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Lowest review score: 0 Another Happy Day
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 97 out of 280
  2. Negative: 42 out of 280
280 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The force of the acting alone almost compensates for some of the more difficult (and realistic) questions about not giving birth that García willfully sidesteps.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The Tillman Story goes deeper, exposing a system of arrogance and duplicity that no WikiLeak could ever fully capture.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Those who groan that the writer-director has made another indulgent film about the obscenely privileged have overlooked Coppola's redoubtable gifts at capturing milieu, languor, and exacting details.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Moves briskly, unfolding as one lively sit-down after another with artists, scholars, and curators who established themselves at the height of second-wave feminism.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The Interrupters reminds us of the powers and pleasures of well-crafted, immersive nonfiction filmmaking.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    You Don't Like the Truth focuses on the pathetic manipulations of Canadian intelligence officers as they interrogate Toronto-born Omar Khadr, the youngest prisoner held in Guantánamo Bay.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Tomboy astutely explores the freedom, however brief, of being untethered to the highly rule-bound world of gender codes.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The Artist is movie love at its most anodyne; where Guy Maddin has used the conventions of silent film to express his loony psychosexual fantasias for more than a decade, Hazanavicius sweetly asks that we not be afraid of the past.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Pina gives us the supreme pleasure of watching fascinating bodies of widely varying ages in motion, whether leaping, falling, catching, diving, grieving, or exulting. Wenders's expert use of 3-D puts viewers up close to the spaces, both psychic and physical, inside and out, of Bausch's work.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The first 10 minutes of Dee Rees's funny, moving, nuanced, and impeccably acted first feature, in which coming of age and coming out are inseparable, sharply reveal the conflicts that 17-year-old Alike (Adepero Oduye) faces.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Filmed during the months leading up to the 2009 presidential election in Iran, The Hunter still seethes with fury - and anticipates the blood that would spill after the vote.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Dalle, with a mouth that could devour the world, unravels inexorably but with decadent dignity, and Chiha's singular film never relies on cliché in its examination of illness, disappointment, and abandonment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Every shot and edit in Wiseman's film also suggests without over-explaining, allowing a viewer to lose herself in pleasure.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Matching the precision of the film's title, remembrances of things past-whether destructive or salutary, quickly mentioned or dilated upon-are shaped by just enough exacting detail.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    El Velador still sharply conveys what life is like in a traumatized nation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    The animation studio's first film with a female protagonist, a defiant lass who acts as a much-welcome corrective to retrograde Disney heroines of the past and the company's unstoppable pink-princess merchandising.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    A funky, nonfiction tribute to the great avant-garde saxophonist Ornette Coleman, Ornette upends the staid portrait-of-the-artist formula, and it tinkers with and discards the conventions of the bio documentary just as its pioneering musician subject exploded those of jazz.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Watching this taciturn man grow close to mother and child - close enough that he experiences twinges of jealousy and abandonment toward the end of Las Acacias - is one of the most satisfying spectacles in a movie this year, a time-lapse of emotions rendered perfectly.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    "Beautiful clothes on good-looking people just moving across the stage" to the sounds of Barry White and Al Green. "It was the presence of these African-American models that really animated the stage," notes Harold Koda of the Met's Costume Institute-- a sentiment that fashion historian Barbara Summers expresses more memorably: The crowd was "peeing in their seats because these girls were so fabulous."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Hawkes and Hunt nobly tackle the physical demands their roles require.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    For many of the film's brisk 84 minutes, Fox eclipses his earlier work-and several other same-sex tragedies-by immersing us in his protagonist's quiet turmoil.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    A fiction film that documents the unpredictable, unscripted actions of its pint-size lead, Nana offers new ways of thinking about childhood, or, at the very least, about children in movies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    If Side Effects, an immensely pleasurable thriller centering around psychotropic drugs, really is Steven Soderbergh's final big-screen film, as the director claims it will be, then he has peaked in the Valley of the Dolls.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Undeniably, the rhythms — of clanging machines, of humans at work and repose — seen and heard here are the tempo of the quotidian and the repetitive. Yet even in their mundanity, these factory routines are not without their exalted moments.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Crucially, all four men, plus the ancillary characters who appear throughout the film, prove to be excellent company, holding forth on literature, Europe's future, inner-ear ailments, and side triceps.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Whether or not James Longley's boldly stylized reportage breaches public indifference, its enduring value is assured: When the war is long gone, this deft construction will persist in relevance, if not for what it says about the mess we once made, then as a model of canny cinematic construction.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    It helps that Wein's subject is such a fascinating, garrulous paradox.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    There's great archival footage.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Wintour's arctic imperiousness has a way of creating the most masochistic deference, a dynamic that R.J Cutler superficially explores--and becomes prone to--in his documentary The September Issue.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    For a movement that was "fundamentally leaderless," Braderman's film gives its participants an opportunity to rightfully claim: "We thought we could change things--and, in fact, we did."

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