Michael O'Sullivan
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For 1,113 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Shakespeare in Love
Lowest review score: 0 Lethal Weapon 4
Score distribution:
1,113 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    While not exactly a cop-out, Virgin may leave some viewers who crave traditional closure with the same hollow ache described by the narrator as follows: "What lingered after them was not life but the most trivial list of mundane facts."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    One half of a very funny movie, and half a funny movie is better than none.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A mediocre production that nevertheless will strike a deep and resonant chord with viewers.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    There are a number of surprises in the idiosyncratic film, and one of its pleasures is the oblique and unchronological way in which Ward peels away the layers of the story, flashing backward and forward in time and jumping between Earth and the Beyond, separating his scenes with blindingly blank, white-out screens.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Feels like a hazy high that takes too long to shake.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end Monsieur N. could use a little less cloak-and-dagger and more of what made "The Emperor's New Clothes" work, i.e., heart.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the unforced humor and honesty in the performances of its young and talented cast, The Wood spends too much time wallowing in arrested adolescence to make you feel you've traveled anywhere.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A well-crafted story with a unique voice. But its literary gifts are outweighed by its pictorial prosaicness. Dimming the screen in every shot is the unmistakable shadow of the page.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite this tale's surface sheen and propulsive momentum, it never transports one very far.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The smart but slight film implodes under the weight of its own "excessive linguistic pressure."
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's no worse than any number of other cookie-cutter slasher flicks geared for the slightly post-pubescent market.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's effectively frightening. It's just not the kind of frightening that stays with you very long, unless of course someone decides to make the same movie . . . yet again.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's actually a lot going on in this little movie, and first-time feature director Stephen Daldry, turning his talents from the theater, handles all of it deftly.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    What modest pleasure the film affords is largely thanks to the charisma of its genial stars.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Plays like a piece of mediocre music, gorgeously rendered.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    That script – co-written by Terry Hayes and director Brian Helgeland – is almost too noir for its own good at times, but Gibson somehow manages to pull its implausibility off.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    In trying to compose a poetic love letter to a time of liberation and freedom, Haynes has merely conjured up memories of druggy excess, egotism and tight trousers. The only mementos worth saving from the experience are available on the soundtrack.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although Monkeybone will undoubtedly make you laugh at its slapstick highjinks, the irony is that for a movie that's ultimately about soul, that's the one commodity that's in precious short supply up on the screen.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is pretty unabashed about the all-but-corny sentiment: Each of us has something to give.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    As a rule, the drawn and computer-animated imagery is top notch and seamlessly integrated, but the central characters' tawny complexions and the often chiaroscuro lighting sometimes obscure all but the whites of their eyes and their pearl-perfect teeth.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Meet Joe Black is Hopkins's movie and, despite the film's unnecessary length, his quiet and dignified performance almost carries the ball across the finish line.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's the Weather Channel on steroids.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film as a whole, while possessing a kind of vicious beauty, feels as cold and as embalmed as a corpse.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A generally well-made tale of humor and hard luck.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A tad preachy and more than a little bit sanctimonious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A jaundiced view of litigation, however authentic, is not necessarily the stuff of great drama, even of the legal-thriller variety, which by definition is confined to a claustrophobic courtroom.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Charming but slight comedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    If these repugnant people were really your friends and neighbors, your time would be more profitably spent reading the real estate listings than the movie reviews. But for 1 1/2 hours in a darkened theater, the derailment of their unhealthy emotions makes for one compulsively watchable train wreck.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Yes, Knowing is creepy, at least for the first two-thirds or so, in a moderately satisfying, if predictable, way.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The kind of stunning and contentious work of art that will leave a lot of folks speechless.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Where Town and Country gets really good and weird – and I do mean good – is only after about an hour into it in deepest, darkest Idaho.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Overwhelmingly predictable despite its cute surprise ending, Tortilla Soup is a filling but unoriginal dish.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Charming but slight.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a pretty compelling yarn, not to mention full of pretty pictures, and yet it could be so much more than that.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a lot more tightly focused than the first outing, and for fans of the demented comedy of Elliott and Cross, or the thespian chops of Woods (a last-minute replacement for an ailing Marlon Brando), it's worth putting up with humor that's the filmic equivalent of a big, spit-soaked raspberry.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Make no mistake. This is partisan filmmaking at its most gleefully unapologetic. Unless they're also masochists, Bill Clinton haters and Ken Starr fans will know better than to buy a ticket.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's something that never quite works about the film.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Satisfies and disturbs in just about equal measure.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It is also, despite the all-too-rare focus on the Filipino American community, a creakily familiar take on an age-old family dynamic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cares not a whit for such arbitrary concepts as justice, crime or punishment. It understands the relativism of right and wrong and takes a kind of perverse pleasure in reminding us that there are some things we'll never know.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Sappy but sweet B-ball Cinderella story that succeeds thanks largely to the outsize charm of its 4-foot-8-inch, corn-rowed protagonist.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Presents an America that is as much about the pathological display of imperial power -- a showmanship of arrogance and violence -- as policy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Blade's stomach-turning special effects, bone-crunching martial arts and cynical humor will more than satisfy any action-film addict's need for a fix of eye-popping escapist adrenaline.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Fitfully amusing and ultimately kind of heartwarming in a twisted sort of way
    • 30 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A considerable cut above the crop of recent features by other 'SNL' alums.
    • Washington Post
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    If Guess Who were either a whole lot funnier, or a whole lot less funny, it would be a far better film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It is this sense of real life blurring with make-believe that Allen's film is really playing with, like a kitten toying with a scared mouse. Back and forth he bats the subject, moving between reality, illusion and the imitation of reality with a deft touch that may bruise but never kills.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A blackhearted little film. What's being marketed as a frothy French confection about jealousy (specifically the jealousy of a regular guy married to a famous movie star) also just so happens to be a portrait of a marriage going down the toilet.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The pleasure is entirely like eating cake made from cake mix. It's not like you don't know how it's going to turn out, or how it tasted the last time you ate it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Now for the bad news. The filmmakers seem to have spent so much attention and, presumably, money on getting the primates right that they completely forgot about the people.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a rousing, fast-paced tale, told with a modicum of verve and packed with colorfully flawed, occasionally heroic and even tragic characters. It also feels disappointingly bloated and too fast-paced by half.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Based on "Romeo and Juliet" the way a martini is "based" on vermouth.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    As large as Earth Two looms - literally - in the frames of Mike Cahill's film, so do its implications. It's one big, honking metaphor, as much as a special effect. As a symbol of second chances, it's as intriguing as it is frustratingly obvious.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Just inspiring enough, just scary enough, just sappy enough and just funny enough to get by.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Director James Watkins knows how to make a body jump out of its skin, even if he does use the face-reflected-in-the-mirror/window trick once too often. At the same time, the film is kind of, well, silly.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, The Devil's Double is one long balance sheet. On the plus side are the dueling performances of Cooper, which anchor the film. On the minus side is a seemingly interminable litany of violence, abuse and degradation. They cheapen the film by nudging it in the direction of a splatter flick.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's like a PBS version of a movie of the week about child abduction, complete with histrionic, spit-flecked speechifying in quaint Irish brogues.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the marquee names and their obvious talent, the film feels like a made-for-TV movie. It’s slight and episodic, with a weirdly scrupulous ambivalence about its subject, whom it seems torn between loving and loathing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although laced with adrenaline and flavored with noirish seasoning, John Frankenheimer's Ronin is a disappointingly conventional thriller.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Controversial, yet undeniably powerful.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film's title suggests the wry irony of hindsight: We've come a long way, baby, but we're not there yet. Any Day Now could do with a little more of that astringent humor and a little less sap.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Goes beyond interesting, though, to moderately annoying.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A compelling if singularly sour tale.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Scares, to be sure, which is certainly one promise on which it delivers. But the film offers little insight into what it seems to be saying is essentially a mundane fact of life: When one devil leaves the world, there is always another one waiting just outside the door.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Dear Nicholas Sparks, There's no easy way to say this. But with Dear John, the latest of the five films made so far from your sentimental, best-selling novels, I think our relationship is in trouble.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Even as Brick Lane manages to sidestep one formula, it falls prey to another.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The problem, sadly, is that the whole amounts to less than the sum of its parts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film’s steady accumulation of little quirks... soon grow tedious. After a while they’re less delightfully oddball touches with a promise of more to come than dead weight with no payoff.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The dialogue in San Andreas is lame, its plot both predictable and implausible, and the character development beside the point. Even Dwayne Johnson, that force of cinematic nature and rock-ribbed charisma, doesn’t have enough charm to dig this mess of a movie out of the rubble of cliche it’s buried in.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you go in with the right attitude, there’s a fair amount of fun to be had from In Secret, considering it’s a musty French costume drama done in plummy English accents.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    With a surprisingly unhappy, anti-Hollywood ending that will appeal to those who like things dark.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Bizarre yet popular.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    I love a good story, too, but I prefer one that actually goes somewhere (although, as joy rides to nowhere are concerned, this one is a beaut).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a case of the heart being in the right place, but the script getting in the way.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Hiddleston steals the show here, making wickedness and treachery look a heck of a lot more fun than virtue.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film actually gets to tackle some larger questions than one normally finds in the average fireball drama.
    • Washington Post
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    At times, it's downright nasty; and that's when I like it best.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like Affleck himself, the film is perfectly satisfactory without being deeply satisfying.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    However many millions of dollars Rodriguez set aside for blanks and exploding squibs was a waste. Depp's salary, on the other hand, was money well spent.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Buffed and waxed to within an inch of its life, Stella registers as more of a sequence of slick commercials than an actual drama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Prime Ministers: The Pioneers is hampered by a static structure that relies too heavily on a single voice.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    During the movie's awww-inducing conclusion, those of you who are allergic to cuteness - or to Jim Carrey - might want to look away.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's lots of extraneous plotting -- which, however fact based, is handled in such a pre-fab manner that it feels phony.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, what mars "Timothy Green" most is its middle-of-the-road approach. Its appealingly quirky, fairy-tale-like center is so coated with sugar, it cloys. It's not that "Timothy Green" is odd, but that it isn't odd enough.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Smashed never really rises much above the level of a dramatic public service announcement. That's not so much because of its tone, but because what it's announcing isn't exactly news. Alcoholism is a disease. Alcoholics aren't bad people. Quitting is hard.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's alternately monotonous, hot and dramatic, which makes for a peculiar, not entirely unsatisfying atmosphere of neo -- or is that post? -- noir. What it all means, of course, I have no idea.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Life of Crime feels like a rambling car ride through the countryside with friends. The scenery is great, and the passengers are diverting, but you keep wondering where the driver is headed.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Isn’t Statham’s best — or most brutal — work, but it’s not bad.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Watchable, if cliched.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is as damnably perplexing as the subject himself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The effects are effective. The humor is humorous and just self-referential enough to let you know the film doesn't take itself too seriously.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Does Lurie have an ax to grind? And how. Yet if, to some ears, its high-pitched whine nearly drowns out the underlying story at times, why did so many in that preview audience seem deaf to it? Maybe that's Lurie's real point: A culture that feeds on violence -- in real life and on film -- has also inured us to it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A fable that is by turns antic, scary, sweet and, in the end, slightly soulless. In other words, it's a heartwarmer that doesn't have much of a heart itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It does exactly what its subject didn’t do: toe the line.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    For those so inclined, it's nice to see the girl and the gangsta -- not the gunslinger -- save the day.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The derriere-flashing, dope-smoking, potty-mouthed antics of this antisocial E.T. justify every bit of the rating that the MPAA has slapped on him.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Land of the Dead is fairly intense. Intensely gory and violent, that is, as has come to be expected from the genre. It's just not very frightening. Not half as frightening as, say, last year's "Dawn of the Dead."
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is not without its pleasures. Kidman and Firth lend the pulpy material a certain prestige, even if Strong comes across as simply another plot device (and a perplexing one at that).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    And that's the moral of this story. Or one of them, anyway. Clash's success is shown as the result of a combination of talent, gumption, pluck, misadventure, supportive parents, following your dreams, luck and, yes, love.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's an infusion of zip that's sorely needed, because the chief deficiency of A Bug's Life so far is its blandness….The film's other weakness is the low-octane vocal performances of its leading cast.

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