Michael O'Sullivan
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For 1,099 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Ernest & Célestine
Lowest review score: 0 Lethal Weapon 4
Score distribution:
1,099 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like the TV show, The X-Files movie is stylish, scary, sardonically funny and at times just plain gross.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Sweet without being saccharine, sad without being maudlin and funny without being forced.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    More honest than any conventional morality tale. Here there are no heroes and no real villains; the good guys are all flawed and even bad guys are sometimes capable of the noblest of acts.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a film about culture clash, the generation gap and the loss of tradition that inevitably accompanies the arrival of anything new.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's daring, deliberately offensive and, for a comedy, it has far more ideas in it than actual laughs.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Zigging and zagging serenely between the extremes of deadpan, postmodern comedy and the antic, Max Sennett-style japery of yore.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    In one bold stride, Benigni has set himself apart from the rank and file of funnymen, joining the elite class of clowns who know that humor and heartbreak are only a howl of pain apart.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Returns to the wicked mix of transgression and positivity epitomized by "Pecker" and "Hairspray."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Engrossing, educational, amusing and disturbing. And who could ask for more than that from a film?
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Apart from the deja vu all over again, Lucky Break is no worse a film than "Breaking Out," and "Breaking Out" was utterly charming.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Max
    Fascinating story.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Powerful yet ambiguous.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Works as both historical allegory and moving family drama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    This is the lightest, brightest and tightest film confection to come down the date pike in quite some time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a story of jaw-dropping chutzpah, grim, mostly hindsight-based humor and more stomach-churning drama than you could find in 10 screenplays.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Feels like a song you may have heard before, but one whose aching beauty makes it endlessly listenable.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Could hardly be more suspenseful if it were scripted.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Where it succeeds best is not in describing how Luzhin got broken but how love fixed him, albeit temporarily.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    A two-hour pleasure cruise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Modest but nonetheless devastating documentary.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    The sprawling cast, the naturalistic, overlapping dialogue (here by screenwriter Jenny Lumet, daughter of director Sidney) and the swirling action: it seemed pure Robert Altman.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Poignant, heartbreaking proof that, sometimes, love is just not enough.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like its Southern California setting, the sunny semi-autobiography is tempered with just the right touch of Jenkins's smoggy cynicism.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's just more wry than funny, more a gently subversive comedy of modern manners than the simpering date movie it seems to be masquerading as.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    With its wise understanding of the magnetic pull (and invisible polarities) of family, Junebug is an auspicious debut for Morrison.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    A wondrous, funny and moving little film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Hilary and Jackie plumbs the cistern of family dysfunction and musical genius to profound and haunting effect.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    A touching and unusual road movie-cum-buddy film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Not everyone's cup of tea, but it's actually rather beautiful.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    The wisecracks fly fast and furious
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    A mostly unsentimental little gem.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    I can't get over the nagging feeling that Pleasantville's beguiling spell was cast by a real magician, only to be carelessly broken by the same clumsy charlatan.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Sorry, stinging fire ants couldn't make me reveal the outcome of this witty and, yes, surprisingly suspenseful adventure.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is a small study in the dignity of letting go.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    A decidedly grown-up affair.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Wickedly funny.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Very, very funny, in that morbid sort of way that makes you laugh even as you shudder with horror.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's also sweet, sentimental, rather funny and, as John Waters films go, surprisingly gentle.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    It is, as with any cinematic joy ride, not the destination that matters, but the rush of getting there.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Hilarious.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Carrey is so gifted a physical comedian that even mediocre material shines in his talented hands, not to mention his talented feet, face, elbows, ears, hair and, ahem, derriere.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    An enormously entertaining visit to planet paranoia, but its escapist pleasures titillate only in direct proportion to the degree of persecution complex that you bring into the theater with you.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Moodysson's cornball sentimentality about the many shapes of the human family is tempered by his honesty about personal frailty and the silliness of utopian living experiments.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Sweet without being saccharine and funny without being forced, the closely observed romantic comedy treats the culinary arts as a metaphor for personal healing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    A raunchy and frequently hilarious follow-up to the gifted Korean American stand-up's "I'm the One That I Want."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    May, at times, be deadpan to the point of stiffness, but it's far from dead.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie may leave its audience feeling a little battered (some might say betrayed) as well. Still, the film's honesty, along with its refusal to pander to Hollywood happy endings, is well worth the beating.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    A sweet, true and, at times, universal love story it is.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Strangely moving film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Startlingly erotic and surprisingly moving.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Yes, it's essentially a remake of a sequel, albeit a sequel that happens to be one of the greatest horror movies ever made, but it more than surpasses the original.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Is Spartan a perfect, or even a great, movie? Probably not. But in its prickly irascibility and deeply unsettling intelligence, it makes for a very, very good one.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Super Size Me is an anti-junk-food screed that manages to entertain even as it informs and alarms.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Good old-fashioned movie storytelling that steadily builds, over the course of nearly three hours, to a white-knuckle conclusion that satisfies on nearly every level.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    A blend of gentle comedy and poignant drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Little Voice may be more of a confection than a square meal, but it's proof of how good a dish can be when the ingredients are of the highest order.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    The spare and unsparing tone of I'll Sleep When I'm Dead makes it as existential -- and as original -- a whodunit as they come.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    Deliberate disorientation keeps the audience constantly off balance, and it's brilliantly effective.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    It also has heart and soul, two commodities all too often in short supply in the field of garden-variety cinema verite.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 80 Michael O'Sullivan
    The strongest magnet in this psychedelic morass is Johnny Depp who, as the story's antic, disgusting and seductive spirit guide, is impossible to look away from.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's the story of changing chefs and changing seasons. It looks at food as not just something that nourishes our bodies, but as something that enriches our lives and our relationships.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    In addition to “pervert” — which Wojtowicz makes sound like a badge of honor — the film offers many other seemingly contradictory assessments of Wojtowicz, mainly from his own mouth: troll, Goldwater Republican, McCarthy peacenik, crazy man, crook, romantic. He was all of those things and more, as The Dog makes vividly obvious.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ender’s Game is more than a parable about bullying, or a disquisition on the concept of the “just war.” It’s also a rousing action film, especially in Imax.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a gorgeous and, believe it or not, riveting documentary . . . about sheep.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Director Neil Burger (“Limitless”) has crafted a popcorn flick that’s leaner, more propulsive and more satisfying than the bestseller that inspired it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though the setting is a retreat from the world, where not terribly much happens, within its confines Lorenzo gets an eye-opener about both human frailty and interconnectedness, courtesy of someone even more troubled than he is.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    To say that there is also a monomania to the film is, if anything, an understatement. But it is precisely that sense of tunnel vision that makes Fury Road such a pulse-pounding pleasure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Crystal, 65, and Goodman, 61, are a long time out of college, but they somehow manage to carry off the callowness of youth.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Oculus director Mike Flanagan has crafted a satisfyingly old-fashioned ghost story that, in its evocation of shivery dread, is the most unnerving poltergeist picture since “The Conjuring.”
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you have a shred of idealism left, it’s hard to watch Citizen Koch without a mounting sense of despair and outrage over the influence that money has come to wield over modern elections.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Chasing Ice aims to accomplish, with pictures, what all the hot air that has been generated on the subject of global warming hasn't been able to do: make a difference.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you didn't know that it was based on a true story, Skin would be a little hard to believe.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It plays out with all the suspense of a thriller. Assisted by acclaimed editor Walter Murch, Levinson wisely shapes the story not around the hardware, which was plagued by malfunctions and other delays, but around the people tasked with making the LHC run.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s as affecting as drama as it is effective as horror. It wrenches, even as it unnerves.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    On one level, The Attack is a mystery, but not the kind you think. It’s obvious from the start who detonated the bomb; the only question is why. It’s a question that probably cannot be answered to the satisfaction of anyone living outside Israel or the occupied territories.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    The final, deeply satisfying conclusion to the trilogy of Swedish thrillers based on Stieg Larsson's bestselling novels.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like a fat slab of pastrami, Deli Man is the cinematic equivalent of comfort food: warm, generous and made with love.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    As she demonstrated in “The Skeleton Twins,” the former “Saturday Night Live” comedian has grown so adept at rendering troubled characters without offering sideline commentary that you can’t help but fall in love with her, even as laughter gives way to uncomfortable silence.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Believe it or not, there's life in the old boy yet. After a disappointing third outing, this "Shrek" brings the cycle of fairy-tale-themed films to a fine finish.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It isn't as sad a movie as "Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work," another behind-the-mask documentary. It's funnier. But it's just as illuminating.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    A movingly told tale of tragedy and its consequences, not just for the players in the original tragedy but also for those touched by their actions, in an ever-widening circle of aftershocks.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    The real value of poetry - of the contest itself - is not revealed until the closing credits, when we see the impressive list of colleges that the movie's four subjects have gone on to.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Unbroken may not exactly be mired in sanctimony, but it’s standing, almost up to its ankles, in an unhealthy sense that its subject — about whose simple humanity the film otherwise goes to great lengths to illuminate — is a candidate for sainthood.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It is the four young actors who play the students who truly shine, and who elevate the formulaic film above and beyond its familiar proceedings.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    A fascinating, funny and informative documentary.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's uncompromisingly steamy, in a way that seems designed to make people who are uncomfortable with a physical relationship between two men even more uncomfortable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    For a kids' movie, the humor, at times, strays a bit too far into grown-up territory.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    This trio of losers somehow forms a kind of loony family. Like the one in "Little Miss Sunshine," which also used the metaphor of a broken-down car to drive home its point, the interpersonal dynamics are out of whack, but not unworkable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Rosewater doesn’t hector, nor does it giggle about the issue of press freedom. It’s an impressive and important piece of storytelling.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Under the direction of George Tillman Jr., these two young performers exercise remarkable restraint, never milking the material for unearned tears.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Kingsman delivers on its promise of escapist fun, with a touch that alternates between Galahad’s old-school polish and Eggsy’s roguish charm. Like the rookie who knows that you have to make a few mistakes while following the master, the movie shrugs off its missteps with a wink and a smile that makes them easy to forgive.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Jealousy is less cynical than it sounds. While certainly no love story, this dry-eyed tale feels achingly, maybe even exhilaratingly alive.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a compelling, even stirring, tale.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Duplass and Moss are so good, and their reactions to the frankly nutty circumstances of the film are so plausible, that the preposterous premise of the story hits home both conceptually and emotionally.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Yes, it features some of the most rapturous footage of calving glaciers and ice floes — alternately freezing and thawing — that you’re likely to have seen (much of it captured on equipment designed and built by the filmmaker). But it is the simple glimpses of ordinary life in an extraordinary place that are the most stirring moments in the film.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Moving without being melodramatic, War of the Buttons is a tale of the worst -- and the best -- that people of all ages are capable of.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Populaire is a mostly delightful and entirely unironic throwback to the kind of film they stopped making about 50 years ago.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is an effective, even heartwarming, tale of one man’s commitment to teaching that playing by the rules is more important than winning.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    By the time it glides -- not lumbers -- to the closing credits, it's also amazingly moving.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    In addition to all the rollicking, ribald humor, Tamara Drewe also has a couple of flashes of darkly comic violence. In a literary sense, it's poetic justice, really. Punishment meted out for bad behavior.

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