Michael O'Sullivan

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For 1,205 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Shrek 2
Lowest review score: 0 Lethal Weapon 4
Score distribution:
1205 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Irish independent feature I Went Down is an elusive leprechaun of a film that doggedly resists being pigeonholed. Once caught, however, it yields a small pot of gold in its droll performances and deadpan wit. [3 July 1998, p.N46]
    • Washington Post
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite melodrama that, at times, is enough to induce diabetes, there's enough wolf whistle in this sexy, scary romp to please anyone.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A hyper-violent, post-apocalyptic Western in the mold of "Mad Max" that can't make up its mind whether it wants to be corny or misanthropic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The title of Ondi Timoner's Sundance award-winning documentary about the loss of privacy in the Internet age says it all: "We Live in Public." Don't believe it? Just try Googling "Tiger Woods" or "Michaele Salahi."
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Tooth Fairy is cute. Which is to say that Dwayne Johnson is cute. How could anybody with the body of Arnold Schwarzenegger (circa 1984) and the smile of Cameron Diaz not be, especially when dressed -- albeit briefly -- in a pink tutu?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's hard to take Predators terribly seriously.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    For the most part, The Other Guys is seriously silly stuff, in the best sense.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    All too often, the second movie of a trilogy is a bridge. ("The Matrix Reloaded," anyone?) As often as not, it feels more like the first half of the last movie than a film in its own right. The Girl Who Played With Fire is no exception.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite broad satire about racism and border fences that will appeal to some liberals, the movie doesn't line up neatly along party lines -- except in that other sense of the word "party." It's a movie that just wants to have fun.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's filthy, funny and kind of sweet, if not quite up to the level of Judd Apatow's oeuvre in the burgeoning field of R-rated comedies with heart. You will laugh and blush in equal measure.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's depressing enough to watch this family's struggles with life. But their pain really hits home when you think that the pants you might be wearing could have contributed to it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Some of it sounds, quite frankly, nuts. And a few of Lomborg's enemies have said as much. But throwing tons of money at the problem with little result? That also sounds kind of crazy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A heck of a ride. On the way to its unpredictable (if less than wholly satisfying) conclusion, it is entertaining, a little silly and visually dazzling.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The single most compelling reason to see Hanna is Hanna herself. As played by Saoirse Ronan, who made her first big splash as another morally challenged youngster in Wright's 2007 "Atonement," the character is a fascinating and frustrating cipher.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Big, slick and showy. It is also undeniably effective entertainment.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    If it sounds wholly bleak, it isn't. Remember, this is a movie about a yard sale. Over the course of the film, Nick struggles with the idea of, as he puts it, "selling all my crap" - he means that both literally and metaphorically - and getting on with his life. That sentiment, and Ferrell's refusal to sentimentalize it, is reason enough to smile.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    For much of the film, this is very funny and fairly original stuff, though Submarine starts to run aground about the time that Jordana and Oliver's relationship does.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Unfortunately, the sequel shortchanges the very relationships that gave the first movie its surprising heart.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Scorchingly raunchy - and yes, pretty funny.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    I'll say one thing for The Skin I Live In, Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodovar's ambitious, crazy, even a-little-bit-infuriating new film: I did not see it coming.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    All in all, In Time is not just stylish but surprisingly substantial. From now on, you'll think twice every time you hear the phrase "rollover minutes."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The humor is even more wildly inappropriate, with a running joke about getting a baby stoned on pot, coke and ecstasy, and a scene inspired by the famous incident in "A Christmas Story" where the kid gets his tongue stuck to a frozen flagpole.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though marketed as a comedy, this film is too creepy and acerbic to be consistently comic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Watching it leaves you feeling less buzzed than jittery and slightly nauseated. If the "Ocean's" movies were martinis, Contraband is a thermos full of coffee.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It will make you jump, to be sure, and your heart to beat a little bit faster. But what's truly scariest about it takes place not in the body, but in the mind.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It is Markus's sensitivity to nuance and to the feelings of others that characterizes every step that he - and this sure-footed if off-kilter film - takes.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Without being parodistic, it manages to poke fun at the air of privilege and strenuous political correctness common to lefty, liberal arts schools, while retaining a certain affection for their heartfelt quirks.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    At the core of the movie is the message that the real lonely hunter is the heart.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    But nature is messy, and Chimpanzee doesn't shrink from that, to its credit. Fothergill and Linfield at least exercise discretion when their cameras capture disturbing turns of event.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like many Aardman films, The Pirates! is awash with silliness. There are far more fleeting visual jokes than one can possibly digest in a single viewing. It makes for an experience that, while geared toward younger, more fidgety audiences, has enough humor to keep Mom and Dad from falling asleep.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    If it weren't so shocking, it would be a lot funnier.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's cute. So is the movie. If it never rises to greatness, it may be because it's also a fairly formulaic romcom.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Both terribly silly and a lot of fun.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's the flaws that Kurtzman builds into People Like Us that make it interesting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A solid and subtly moving portrait of the people of Burma.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Refreshingly free of hot air.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's powerful stuff, but I almost felt like I needed an intermission.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Hello I Must Be Going isn't heavy lifting, to be sure. But it's still worthy of a little end zone dance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Snitch is protein-and-starch filmmaking at its utilitarian -- and belly-filling -- best. Johnson brings the steak; Bernthal the sizzle. The father-son drama is served up as sauce on the side. But as long as the beef isn’t too overcooked, who needs the A1?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Just good, goofy fun, for a generation too young to have met Bamm-Bamm.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s silly and a bit sappy, but it works, in a crowd-pleasing way.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s an engrossing, if complicated and twisty, story, with plentiful sci-fi action and a provocative subtext about the nature of the human soul. At times, however, the balance between those two things feels off.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Enormously visually appealing, even if the story itself is almost unrecognizably bloated.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, its somewhat equivocal message — that nuclear power might just be the lesser of several evils — is more convincing than you’d think.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    To refuse to call A Hijacking a thriller is not to say it isn’t thrilling, in a dryly cerebral way. Writer-director Tobias Lindholm has a point to make, and he makes it pungently.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Elemental speaks to the importance of protecting the natural elements: water, air, earth. It’s a beautifully filmed piece, even when it’s showing us white clouds of pollutants billowing out of a smokestack.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Look of Love also is filled with acres and acres of naked flesh, but it’s the storytelling that keeps you engaged.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The joke seems to be that in 2013, it’s hard to teach an old bloodsucker new tricks. Still, Byzantium has a few moves that might surprise you. They have nothing to do with blood, but everything to do with the heart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    One thing the film does do, if only inadvertently, is offer insight as to how we have gotten to this state of affairs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a fascinating inside look, made all the more thrilling by Marking’s access to actual Pink Panthers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film’s counterintuitive success is largely due to Derbez, who demonstrates why he is beloved, both south and north of the border.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is about so much more than politics. Growing up, growing disillusioned, gaining wisdom — these are the themes of Levitt’s slight but eminently watchable film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Because The Summit jumps around in time and because the events on the mountain happened over two days and at locations often far apart, the already garbled chronology of deaths is made even more confusing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Levine brings a lot of visual style to “Mandy,” in addition to coaxing subdued, believable performances from his young cast.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Starbuck was a funny and warm-hearted trifle. So is Delivery Man.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Armstrong Lie is thorough, fair and thoughtful. It may not, however, close the book on the scandal.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    In general, Lee directs with less visual verve than Park. Anchored by Brolin, who brings an almost simian physicality to his portrayal, this Oldboy feels simultaneously less showy, less nightmarish and less epic than the original.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite Page’s excellent voiceover, “Bettie Page” suffers from embarrassingly choppy editing and a parade of stock film clips used to illustrate episodes recounted by its subject.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film feels claustrophobic at times, and stagy. It helps that the supporting cast is uniformly good.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Gimme Shelter has a lighter touch than you might think. Yet there are times when its attempts at wringing drama out of real life are more strenuous than is strictly necessary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Compared to the “Fast and Furious” films, Hours is a chamber piece, but Walker wrings real pathos out of his instrument.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Collet-Serra, who directed Neeson in “Unknown,” has a knack for keeping things lively and moving forward. There are moments of humor, gripping action and real terror.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Adler nicely harnesses the mounting volatility of this situation, which builds to an intense if tragic conclusion.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though writer-director Richard Shepard (“The Matador”) knows how to spin a yarn about the vicissitudes of fate, Dom’s adventures make for a pretty thin garment in which to cloth such an outsize antihero.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is less deeply affecting than merely admirable. It’s a good, slick and well-intentioned film that wants so hard to be an important one that the slight feeling of letdown it leaves is magnified.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s a far more interesting movie taking place alongside this more than slightly silly one.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The story’s message may not be the most original one in the world — put down your device and make eye contact — but it’s fun to watch it unfold in a world that, while far from realistic, feels real enough.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Fortunately, the monsters are actually kind of a kick. And isn’t that why you go to see a movie like this anyway?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Double retains all of Dostoevsky’s central themes. Madness, alienation and the loss of identity swirl around the film’s edges like film-noir fog. At the same time, the filmmakers inject a much-needed dose of dark humor into the tale.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The real problem with A Million Ways to Die in the West is one of editing. There are a million jokes in it, but only 500,000 of them are funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    “Restrepo” felt like the story of how boys become men. Korengal feels like the story of how strangers become family.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The absence of legal details makes the movie something of a cheat. It offers few insights about the case from the official side, let alone about the machinations of Ai’s legal team.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a thoughtful and workmanlike portrait, but a less than profoundly moving one.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Segel and Diaz are gifted and game comedians, with a lot of audience appeal. But Lowe clearly upstages them, consummating their Sex Tape — and making you want to roll over and have a cigarette — while there’s still one reel to go.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film ends with an ambiguous, yet powerful conclusion. It doesn’t answer the question it raises, yet the way it’s asked keeps it echoing in your head. Except that Cahill can’t seem to leave well enough alone.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The sense, in the first half of the film, that love and contentment are attainable dreams slowly gives way to the more existential notion that happiness is really just a fairy tale.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The final destination of A Five Star Life is well worth the wait, but the service is so slow that some viewers may check out early.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Pay 2 Play makes no new revelations... The difference with this movie is that it actually means to inspire hope.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Wetlands has only a sketchy plot, based largely on Helen’s dreams, fantasies and childhood memories. It isn’t terribly clear where the movie — or its hedonistic heroine — is going, but getting there is one wild ride.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Take Me to the River includes just enough history of the civil rights era to lend it gravitas. The color-blind recording practices of studios like Stax were an anomaly at the time and are well worth noting. But it’s the music people will want to hearken to.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the film’s heavy-handed effort at vindication, Renner manages to deliver a performance that is complex and satisfyingly contradictory.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s engaging and watchable, even as it marches toward a seemingly suicidal climax. Yet the complex dynamic between Wardaddy and his men is far more fascinating.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A lovingly laid-back documentary about the charms, liquid and otherwise, of the traditional Irish watering hole.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is an intellectual puzzle, the outcome of which is never in doubt. Its minor thrills come not from not knowing what will happen, but from watching the cagey choreography of two acrobatic minds.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Jackson’s storytelling at this point is so driven by green-screen trickery and digital legerdemain that he seems to have forgotten about human emotion.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    While by no means a masterpiece, the comedy, by Canadian director Ken Scott, is a careful calibration of crass gags and genuine sentiment that succeeds more often than it fails.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There is, however, a certain urgency to the action that will prevent most people from noticing the film’s flaws.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Stirring at times, soggy and overly sentimental at others, the film moves surprisingly slow, even though its action, which takes place over many years of legal maneuvering, has been condensed for narrative expediency.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie marches so quickly past the many milestones of Welles’s career and life that it doesn’t have to time to linger — lovingly or otherwise — on any of them.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you can hang on for close to two hours with almost no resolution, it’s worth the ride.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film suffers a bit for its slowness. But once you get used to the fact that this is not “World War Z,” it has its small pleasures, which are both cerebral and emotional.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although he comes across as a sort of elfin crypt-keeper in this intriguing portrait by documentarian Belinda Sallin, Giger was also, quite literally, close to death.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Servin and Vamos clearly have a healthy sense of the absurd, which they use, like good satirists, to highlight hypocrisy, greed and corruption.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Max
    Despite the overplaying, Max gets its job done, which is to celebrate the sacrifices of military dogs, while warming the cockles of your heart.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Genisys goes back to what made the franchise work in the first place: not the machine inside the man, but vice versa.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Artful yet agonizingly unhurried at times.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    I, too, once enjoyed the Minions, in the small doses that they came in. But the extra-strength Minions is, for better or for worse, too much of a good thing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Batkid would be easier to swallow if it focused less on self-congratulation than on the epidemic of unselfishness that inspired the magic in the first place.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    One wonders what someone who has never heard of the guy...would make of the film, which is defiantly, even, at times, obnoxiously, obtuse. Which, come to think of it, is actually kind of like the Russell we see in the film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    If the movie is cheesy at times, it more often presents an understanding of life’s contradictions and compromises.

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