Michael O'Sullivan
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For 1,113 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Incendies
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
1,113 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's hard to take Predators terribly seriously.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a fascinating inside look, made all the more thrilling by Marking’s access to actual Pink Panthers.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    But nature is messy, and Chimpanzee doesn't shrink from that, to its credit. Fothergill and Linfield at least exercise discretion when their cameras capture disturbing turns of event.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Segel and Diaz are gifted and game comedians, with a lot of audience appeal. But Lowe clearly upstages them, consummating their Sex Tape — and making you want to roll over and have a cigarette — while there’s still one reel to go.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s an engrossing, if complicated and twisty, story, with plentiful sci-fi action and a provocative subtext about the nature of the human soul. At times, however, the balance between those two things feels off.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like many Aardman films, The Pirates! is awash with silliness. There are far more fleeting visual jokes than one can possibly digest in a single viewing. It makes for an experience that, while geared toward younger, more fidgety audiences, has enough humor to keep Mom and Dad from falling asleep.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Jackson’s storytelling at this point is so driven by green-screen trickery and digital legerdemain that he seems to have forgotten about human emotion.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The single most compelling reason to see Hanna is Hanna herself. As played by Saoirse Ronan, who made her first big splash as another morally challenged youngster in Wright's 2007 "Atonement," the character is a fascinating and frustrating cipher.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The title of Ondi Timoner's Sundance award-winning documentary about the loss of privacy in the Internet age says it all: "We Live in Public." Don't believe it? Just try Googling "Tiger Woods" or "Michaele Salahi."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Snitch is protein-and-starch filmmaking at its utilitarian -- and belly-filling -- best. Johnson brings the steak; Bernthal the sizzle. The father-son drama is served up as sauce on the side. But as long as the beef isn’t too overcooked, who needs the A1?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s engaging and watchable, even as it marches toward a seemingly suicidal climax. Yet the complex dynamic between Wardaddy and his men is far more fascinating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you can hang on for close to two hours with almost no resolution, it’s worth the ride.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Some of it sounds, quite frankly, nuts. And a few of Lomborg's enemies have said as much. But throwing tons of money at the problem with little result? That also sounds kind of crazy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite melodrama that, at times, is enough to induce diabetes, there's enough wolf whistle in this sexy, scary romp to please anyone.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A solid and subtly moving portrait of the people of Burma.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    “Restrepo” felt like the story of how boys become men. Korengal feels like the story of how strangers become family.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though writer-director Richard Shepard (“The Matador”) knows how to spin a yarn about the vicissitudes of fate, Dom’s adventures make for a pretty thin garment in which to cloth such an outsize antihero.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s a far more interesting movie taking place alongside this more than slightly silly one.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The story’s message may not be the most original one in the world — put down your device and make eye contact — but it’s fun to watch it unfold in a world that, while far from realistic, feels real enough.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Enormously visually appealing, even if the story itself is almost unrecognizably bloated.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    While by no means a masterpiece, the comedy, by Canadian director Ken Scott, is a careful calibration of crass gags and genuine sentiment that succeeds more often than it fails.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The sense, in the first half of the film, that love and contentment are attainable dreams slowly gives way to the more existential notion that happiness is really just a fairy tale.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The final destination of A Five Star Life is well worth the wait, but the service is so slow that some viewers may check out early.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Take Me to the River includes just enough history of the civil rights era to lend it gravitas. The color-blind recording practices of studios like Stax were an anomaly at the time and are well worth noting. But it’s the music people will want to hearken to.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Starbuck was a funny and warm-hearted trifle. So is Delivery Man.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Just good, goofy fun, for a generation too young to have met Bamm-Bamm.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Tooth Fairy is cute. Which is to say that Dwayne Johnson is cute. How could anybody with the body of Arnold Schwarzenegger (circa 1984) and the smile of Cameron Diaz not be, especially when dressed -- albeit briefly -- in a pink tutu?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is an intellectual puzzle, the outcome of which is never in doubt. Its minor thrills come not from not knowing what will happen, but from watching the cagey choreography of two acrobatic minds.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Armstrong Lie is thorough, fair and thoughtful. It may not, however, close the book on the scandal.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Servin and Vamos clearly have a healthy sense of the absurd, which they use, like good satirists, to highlight hypocrisy, greed and corruption.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A hyper-violent, post-apocalyptic Western in the mold of "Mad Max" that can't make up its mind whether it wants to be corny or misanthropic.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A lovingly laid-back documentary about the charms, liquid and otherwise, of the traditional Irish watering hole.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Watching it leaves you feeling less buzzed than jittery and slightly nauseated. If the "Ocean's" movies were martinis, Contraband is a thermos full of coffee.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Fortunately, the monsters are actually kind of a kick. And isn’t that why you go to see a movie like this anyway?
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Gimme Shelter has a lighter touch than you might think. Yet there are times when its attempts at wringing drama out of real life are more strenuous than is strictly necessary.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Collet-Serra, who directed Neeson in “Unknown,” has a knack for keeping things lively and moving forward. There are moments of humor, gripping action and real terror.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Compared to the “Fast and Furious” films, Hours is a chamber piece, but Walker wrings real pathos out of his instrument.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The absence of legal details makes the movie something of a cheat. It offers few insights about the case from the official side, let alone about the machinations of Ai’s legal team.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Double retains all of Dostoevsky’s central themes. Madness, alienation and the loss of identity swirl around the film’s edges like film-noir fog. At the same time, the filmmakers inject a much-needed dose of dark humor into the tale.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    If it weren't so shocking, it would be a lot funnier.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's cute. So is the movie. If it never rises to greatness, it may be because it's also a fairly formulaic romcom.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Big, slick and showy. It is also undeniably effective entertainment.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a thoughtful and workmanlike portrait, but a less than profoundly moving one.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the film’s heavy-handed effort at vindication, Renner manages to deliver a performance that is complex and satisfyingly contradictory.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite broad satire about racism and border fences that will appeal to some liberals, the movie doesn't line up neatly along party lines -- except in that other sense of the word "party." It's a movie that just wants to have fun.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's filthy, funny and kind of sweet, if not quite up to the level of Judd Apatow's oeuvre in the burgeoning field of R-rated comedies with heart. You will laugh and blush in equal measure.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s silly and a bit sappy, but it works, in a crowd-pleasing way.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The humor is even more wildly inappropriate, with a running joke about getting a baby stoned on pot, coke and ecstasy, and a scene inspired by the famous incident in "A Christmas Story" where the kid gets his tongue stuck to a frozen flagpole.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's depressing enough to watch this family's struggles with life. But their pain really hits home when you think that the pants you might be wearing could have contributed to it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's the flaws that Kurtzman builds into People Like Us that make it interesting.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    To refuse to call A Hijacking a thriller is not to say it isn’t thrilling, in a dryly cerebral way. Writer-director Tobias Lindholm has a point to make, and he makes it pungently.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Both terribly silly and a lot of fun.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There is, however, a certain urgency to the action that will prevent most people from noticing the film’s flaws.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It will make you jump, to be sure, and your heart to beat a little bit faster. But what's truly scariest about it takes place not in the body, but in the mind.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, its somewhat equivocal message — that nuclear power might just be the lesser of several evils — is more convincing than you’d think.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Pay 2 Play makes no new revelations... The difference with this movie is that it actually means to inspire hope.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Look of Love also is filled with acres and acres of naked flesh, but it’s the storytelling that keeps you engaged.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Elemental speaks to the importance of protecting the natural elements: water, air, earth. It’s a beautifully filmed piece, even when it’s showing us white clouds of pollutants billowing out of a smokestack.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Wetlands has only a sketchy plot, based largely on Helen’s dreams, fantasies and childhood memories. It isn’t terribly clear where the movie — or its hedonistic heroine — is going, but getting there is one wild ride.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    For the most part, The Other Guys is seriously silly stuff, in the best sense.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The real problem with A Million Ways to Die in the West is one of editing. There are a million jokes in it, but only 500,000 of them are funny.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's powerful stuff, but I almost felt like I needed an intermission.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It is Markus's sensitivity to nuance and to the feelings of others that characterizes every step that he - and this sure-footed if off-kilter film - takes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film ends with an ambiguous, yet powerful conclusion. It doesn’t answer the question it raises, yet the way it’s asked keeps it echoing in your head. Except that Cahill can’t seem to leave well enough alone.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    While not exactly a cop-out, Virgin may leave some viewers who crave traditional closure with the same hollow ache described by the narrator as follows: "What lingered after them was not life but the most trivial list of mundane facts."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    One half of a very funny movie, and half a funny movie is better than none.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A mediocre production that nevertheless will strike a deep and resonant chord with viewers.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    There are a number of surprises in the idiosyncratic film, and one of its pleasures is the oblique and unchronological way in which Ward peels away the layers of the story, flashing backward and forward in time and jumping between Earth and the Beyond, separating his scenes with blindingly blank, white-out screens.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Feels like a hazy high that takes too long to shake.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end Monsieur N. could use a little less cloak-and-dagger and more of what made "The Emperor's New Clothes" work, i.e., heart.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the unforced humor and honesty in the performances of its young and talented cast, The Wood spends too much time wallowing in arrested adolescence to make you feel you've traveled anywhere.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A well-crafted story with a unique voice. But its literary gifts are outweighed by its pictorial prosaicness. Dimming the screen in every shot is the unmistakable shadow of the page.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite this tale's surface sheen and propulsive momentum, it never transports one very far.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The smart but slight film implodes under the weight of its own "excessive linguistic pressure."
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's no worse than any number of other cookie-cutter slasher flicks geared for the slightly post-pubescent market.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's effectively frightening. It's just not the kind of frightening that stays with you very long, unless of course someone decides to make the same movie . . . yet again.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's actually a lot going on in this little movie, and first-time feature director Stephen Daldry, turning his talents from the theater, handles all of it deftly.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    What modest pleasure the film affords is largely thanks to the charisma of its genial stars.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Plays like a piece of mediocre music, gorgeously rendered.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    That script – co-written by Terry Hayes and director Brian Helgeland – is almost too noir for its own good at times, but Gibson somehow manages to pull its implausibility off.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    In trying to compose a poetic love letter to a time of liberation and freedom, Haynes has merely conjured up memories of druggy excess, egotism and tight trousers. The only mementos worth saving from the experience are available on the soundtrack.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although Monkeybone will undoubtedly make you laugh at its slapstick highjinks, the irony is that for a movie that's ultimately about soul, that's the one commodity that's in precious short supply up on the screen.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is pretty unabashed about the all-but-corny sentiment: Each of us has something to give.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    As a rule, the drawn and computer-animated imagery is top notch and seamlessly integrated, but the central characters' tawny complexions and the often chiaroscuro lighting sometimes obscure all but the whites of their eyes and their pearl-perfect teeth.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Meet Joe Black is Hopkins's movie and, despite the film's unnecessary length, his quiet and dignified performance almost carries the ball across the finish line.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's the Weather Channel on steroids.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film as a whole, while possessing a kind of vicious beauty, feels as cold and as embalmed as a corpse.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A generally well-made tale of humor and hard luck.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A tad preachy and more than a little bit sanctimonious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A jaundiced view of litigation, however authentic, is not necessarily the stuff of great drama, even of the legal-thriller variety, which by definition is confined to a claustrophobic courtroom.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Charming but slight comedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    If these repugnant people were really your friends and neighbors, your time would be more profitably spent reading the real estate listings than the movie reviews. But for 1 1/2 hours in a darkened theater, the derailment of their unhealthy emotions makes for one compulsively watchable train wreck.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Yes, Knowing is creepy, at least for the first two-thirds or so, in a moderately satisfying, if predictable, way.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The kind of stunning and contentious work of art that will leave a lot of folks speechless.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Where Town and Country gets really good and weird – and I do mean good – is only after about an hour into it in deepest, darkest Idaho.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Overwhelmingly predictable despite its cute surprise ending, Tortilla Soup is a filling but unoriginal dish.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Charming but slight.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a pretty compelling yarn, not to mention full of pretty pictures, and yet it could be so much more than that.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a lot more tightly focused than the first outing, and for fans of the demented comedy of Elliott and Cross, or the thespian chops of Woods (a last-minute replacement for an ailing Marlon Brando), it's worth putting up with humor that's the filmic equivalent of a big, spit-soaked raspberry.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Make no mistake. This is partisan filmmaking at its most gleefully unapologetic. Unless they're also masochists, Bill Clinton haters and Ken Starr fans will know better than to buy a ticket.

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