Michael O'Sullivan
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For 1,032 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Turtles Can Fly
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
1,032 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Look of Love also is filled with acres and acres of naked flesh, but it’s the storytelling that keeps you engaged.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The joke seems to be that in 2013, it’s hard to teach an old bloodsucker new tricks. Still, Byzantium has a few moves that might surprise you. They have nothing to do with blood, but everything to do with the heart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    One thing the film does do, if only inadvertently, is offer insight as to how we have gotten to this state of affairs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a fascinating inside look, made all the more thrilling by Marking’s access to actual Pink Panthers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film’s counterintuitive success is largely due to Derbez, who demonstrates why he is beloved, both south and north of the border.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Because The Summit jumps around in time and because the events on the mountain happened over two days and at locations often far apart, the already garbled chronology of deaths is made even more confusing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Levine brings a lot of visual style to “Mandy,” in addition to coaxing subdued, believable performances from his young cast.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Starbuck was a funny and warm-hearted trifle. So is Delivery Man.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Armstrong Lie is thorough, fair and thoughtful. It may not, however, close the book on the scandal.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    In general, Lee directs with less visual verve than Park. Anchored by Brolin, who brings an almost simian physicality to his portrayal, this Oldboy feels simultaneously less showy, less nightmarish and less epic than the original.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite Page’s excellent voiceover, “Bettie Page” suffers from embarrassingly choppy editing and a parade of stock film clips used to illustrate episodes recounted by its subject.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film feels claustrophobic at times, and stagy. It helps that the supporting cast is uniformly good.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Gimme Shelter has a lighter touch than you might think. Yet there are times when its attempts at wringing drama out of real life are more strenuous than is strictly necessary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Compared to the “Fast and Furious” films, Hours is a chamber piece, but Walker wrings real pathos out of his instrument.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Collet-Serra, who directed Neeson in “Unknown,” has a knack for keeping things lively and moving forward. There are moments of humor, gripping action and real terror.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Adler nicely harnesses the mounting volatility of this situation, which builds to an intense if tragic conclusion.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though writer-director Richard Shepard (“The Matador”) knows how to spin a yarn about the vicissitudes of fate, Dom’s adventures make for a pretty thin garment in which to cloth such an outsize antihero.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is less deeply affecting than merely admirable. It’s a good, slick and well-intentioned film that wants so hard to be an important one that the slight feeling of letdown it leaves is magnified.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s a far more interesting movie taking place alongside this more than slightly silly one.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The story’s message may not be the most original one in the world — put down your device and make eye contact — but it’s fun to watch it unfold in a world that, while far from realistic, feels real enough.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Fortunately, the monsters are actually kind of a kick. And isn’t that why you go to see a movie like this anyway?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Double retains all of Dostoevsky’s central themes. Madness, alienation and the loss of identity swirl around the film’s edges like film-noir fog. At the same time, the filmmakers inject a much-needed dose of dark humor into the tale.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The real problem with A Million Ways to Die in the West is one of editing. There are a million jokes in it, but only 500,000 of them are funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    “Restrepo” felt like the story of how boys become men. Korengal feels like the story of how strangers become family.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The absence of legal details makes the movie something of a cheat. It offers few insights about the case from the official side, let alone about the machinations of Ai’s legal team.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a thoughtful and workmanlike portrait, but a less than profoundly moving one.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Segel and Diaz are gifted and game comedians, with a lot of audience appeal. But Lowe clearly upstages them, consummating their Sex Tape — and making you want to roll over and have a cigarette — while there’s still one reel to go.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film ends with an ambiguous, yet powerful conclusion. It doesn’t answer the question it raises, yet the way it’s asked keeps it echoing in your head. Except that Cahill can’t seem to leave well enough alone.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The sense, in the first half of the film, that love and contentment are attainable dreams slowly gives way to the more existential notion that happiness is really just a fairy tale.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The final destination of A Five Star Life is well worth the wait, but the service is so slow that some viewers may check out early.