Michael O'Sullivan
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For 1,035 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Rich Hill
Lowest review score: 0 Lethal Weapon 4
Score distribution:
1,035 movie reviews
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a pretty scathing satire of reality TV, including itself, which makes it both what it is, and a critique of what it is.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    When it is good, the film by "Chicago Hope" actor Peter Berg is very, very good, but when it is bad it is horrid.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    You'd never know it from the innocuous-looking trailers, but Home Fries is really "When Dorian Met Sally" meets "Psycho."
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The bad news is that the opening credits, which make sick and darkly comic allusions to suicide, are the best thing about the film.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's alternately monotonous, hot and dramatic, which makes for a peculiar, not entirely unsatisfying atmosphere of neo -- or is that post? -- noir. What it all means, of course, I have no idea.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Broad and cheesy, yet it is not utterly without a kind of junk-food appeal.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A compelling if singularly sour tale.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Buffed and waxed to within an inch of its life, Stella registers as more of a sequence of slick commercials than an actual drama.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It isn't that Bobby Jones is especially bad. It's just not especially good, either.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Strikes several beautiful and lingering chords about the human condition, but the notes of the music ultimately never come together to form a coherent song.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It never really feels like we've gotten to know the man himself, leaving the figure at the heart of I'll Sing for You a cipher.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Watching Tea with Mussolini is probably a lot like having tea with Mussolini would be: never dull but neither, I imagine, an entirely pleasant experience.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film does not jerk tears as much as it knocks you down and runs away with them.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There just aren't many laughs in this slack dramedy, and what yuks there are are fairly low-wattage.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The mixture of tension, yuks and horrific violence at times reminds one of nothing more than a poor man's "Pulp Fiction."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Preaches most effectively to the converted.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Unfortunately, Nair's film doesn't so much end as fall off a cliff, the ultimate victim of viewers' heightened expectations that this briskly paced story will take them someplace -- other than around the block in a horse-drawn carriage.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    As messages go, I've certainly heard worse. As movies go, Wimbledon is a generally painless float down a lazy river.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    This is a sophisticated movie, but one whose sophistication is surprisingly simple-minded.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's the sick humor that's most appealing about this odd little Danish film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's like a PBS version of a movie of the week about child abduction, complete with histrionic, spit-flecked speechifying in quaint Irish brogues.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There remains a maddening emptiness where the film's ostensible subject should be.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's just that, in this world of clanking, hissing machines, even the people seem like robots.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Just inspiring enough, just scary enough, just sappy enough and just funny enough to get by.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's not brilliant by any means, but bright enough to light up an overly familiar feel-good story.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Plays more like a philosophical debate than a war drama.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Lords of Dogtown isn't a cop-out, but rather an ever-so-slight concession to commercialism.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Land of the Dead is fairly intense. Intensely gory and violent, that is, as has come to be expected from the genre. It's just not very frightening. Not half as frightening as, say, last year's "Dawn of the Dead."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    For all its well-drawn lines between good and evil, Four Brothers is ultimately passive entertainment.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A mite too hard to follow for most of the kiddie crowd who'll want to see it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Even as Brick Lane manages to sidestep one formula, it falls prey to another.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    What really sells this three-hanky tear-jerker -- and there were a lot of women buying it during a recent screening -- is Lane's steely and vulnerable performance. Like Tinker Bell, she almost made me believe in fairies. Almost.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite some Cold War humor, the formulaic film is aimed squarely at the youngest of young children.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Morning Light, sailor's delight. All others be forewarned.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a rousing, fast-paced tale, told with a modicum of verve and packed with colorfully flawed, occasionally heroic and even tragic characters. It also feels disappointingly bloated and too fast-paced by half.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It will put some viewers in mind of yet another story with the same theme: "Pinocchio."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The singer-actress has screen presence to spare and a nice, rich voice. By the time her young fans outgrow her -- or she them -- she should have an excellent chance at a second career. Making, you know, real movies and real music.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Beltrn, for his part, makes a solidly believable Garca Lorca. The problem is with the man with whom he's obsessed. In Pattinson's performance, we never see what Garca Lorca sees in Dal.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A fable that is by turns antic, scary, sweet and, in the end, slightly soulless. In other words, it's a heartwarmer that doesn't have much of a heart itself.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie isn't exactly full of twists and turns, but neither is it a long, hard slog.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Much of the film's humor hovers around crotch level. If jokes about mental illness, terminal disease and sex with orangutans sound funny to you, go for it.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Call it a Christmas miracle, albeit a minor one: Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel isn't entirely awful.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Dear Nicholas Sparks, There's no easy way to say this. But with Dear John, the latest of the five films made so far from your sentimental, best-selling novels, I think our relationship is in trouble.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a hyper-violent buddy comedy. If you like that sort of thing -- think "Training Day," with laughs -- you'll love this.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie suffers by taking itself a little too seriously. It's not just that it's a lot less funny than the book. It's also a lot less fun.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite its earnestness and valuable lessons, however, "Blood" feels a little like preaching to the choir.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's tasty enough, and probably good for you, but at 73 minutes, the film is hardly a very filling entree.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's a visceral, albeit somewhat goofy, satisfaction to this stuff.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The first dumb-fun action movie of the summer season has arrived early with The Losers, a loud, loving homage to guns and testosterone based on a series of comic books about a renegade band of CIA operatives. How dumb is it? You might actually kill a few million brain cells just watching it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    An energetic if empty-headed adventure based on the popular video game.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Except for the last five minutes, Robin Hood is the story of the radicalization of some guy named Longstride. Who?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Telegraphs its every move. There are simply no surprises.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The insecurities that seem to feed Rivers's often angry humor -- and that have left her face looking like a mask frozen in horror -- are left unexamined.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is as damnably perplexing as the subject himself.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    All in all, Jack Goes Boating is an auspicious -- if slightly ostentatious -- debut by Hoffman, one of today's greatest actors. Maybe next time his performance in front of his camera will be as subtle as his performance behind it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Let Me In wants to make your flesh crawl, and it probably will. But it's unlikely to ever get under anyone's skin, the way "Let the Right One In" did.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It starts out with a tsunami - and ends up standing in a puddle.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's plenty to scratch your head about here. Is it a drama? A comedy? And if it's a farce, what's it making fun of?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There are worse things than being trapped inside a computer game with Olivia Wilde. In Tron: Legacy, the loud, long and less than wholly satisfying sequel to "Tron," that's the bittersweet fate of Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges), the computer-nerd hero of both the 1982 sci-fi cult classic and its high-tech, 3-D update.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's hard not to feel a certain affection for a tale that is so unapologetic about just that: affection.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The derriere-flashing, dope-smoking, potty-mouthed antics of this antisocial E.T. justify every bit of the rating that the MPAA has slapped on him.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Still, what separates Walking With Destiny from a run-of-the-mill war documentary isn't necessarily its insights into its main subject but its tangential stories about fascinating nobodies.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The effects are effective. The humor is humorous and just self-referential enough to let you know the film doesn't take itself too seriously.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    And, yes, Kung Fu Panda 2 is a little darker and a little more intense than the first film, especially for very young viewers.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    During the movie's awww-inducing conclusion, those of you who are allergic to cuteness - or to Jim Carrey - might want to look away.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a light and breezy, recession-themed romantic comedy; "Up in the Air" without all the angst and introspection.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Now for the bad news. The filmmakers seem to have spent so much attention and, presumably, money on getting the primates right that they completely forgot about the people.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    As large as Earth Two looms - literally - in the frames of Mike Cahill's film, so do its implications. It's one big, honking metaphor, as much as a special effect. As a symbol of second chances, it's as intriguing as it is frustratingly obvious.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, The Devil's Double is one long balance sheet. On the plus side are the dueling performances of Cooper, which anchor the film. On the minus side is a seemingly interminable litany of violence, abuse and degradation. They cheapen the film by nudging it in the direction of a splatter flick.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Plays less like a conventional medical thriller - think "Outbreak" - than like a dramatic reading of a "Nova" episode, performed by Hollywood's elite.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Does Lurie have an ax to grind? And how. Yet if, to some ears, its high-pitched whine nearly drowns out the underlying story at times, why did so many in that preview audience seem deaf to it? Maybe that's Lurie's real point: A culture that feeds on violence -- in real life and on film -- has also inured us to it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A slightly soggy tale of father-son bonding, crossed with an action-adventure flick about high-tech battle-bots.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    And that's the moral of this story. Or one of them, anyway. Clash's success is shown as the result of a combination of talent, gumption, pluck, misadventure, supportive parents, following your dreams, luck and, yes, love.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Director James Watkins knows how to make a body jump out of its skin, even if he does use the face-reflected-in-the-mirror/window trick once too often. At the same time, the film is kind of, well, silly.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    At times, the movie has the look and feel of the cheaply made late-night commercials that it mercilessly, and occasionally hilariously, mocks.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Crafted by writer-director Jill Sprecher and co-writer sister Karen - a filmmaking duo who are sometimes jokingly referred to as the "Coen sisters" - it will erase any lingering memories of "Fargo."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Does it matter that Maggie might be a charlatan if she's truly capable of helping people? That's the film's most intriguing, and open-ended, question - not the more gimmicky one that will leave you hanging, and probably disappointed, at the end.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The lens through which the The Intouchables was filmed may be too rose-colored for some people's taste, but the window that these talented performers throw open -- a window onto the strange and touching friendship between two very different men -- is crystal clear.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, what mars "Timothy Green" most is its middle-of-the-road approach. Its appealingly quirky, fairy-tale-like center is so coated with sugar, it cloys. It's not that "Timothy Green" is odd, but that it isn't odd enough.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The question isn't whether Toys in the Attic is any good. The question is: good for whom?
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Entertaining enough for the trick-or-treat crowd, but a bit more bite wouldn't kill it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie Vulgaria is not one for the kiddies. Then again, the description "for mature audiences" doesn't seem right either. The Hong Kong comedy, a broad, cartoonish -- and decidedly filthy -- satire of moviemaking is as sophomoric as they come. It's also pretty funny, in an unapologetically over-the-top way.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie itself is a tad overheated. In the lurid, swampy, yet almost perversely engrossing follow-up to director Lee Daniels's "Precious," the temperature is set to "sizzle." Ironically, it could have used a little more time in the oven.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    When the jokes work, it's for a simple reason: The four actors playing the couples are seasoned veterans of film comedy (although each is more than capable of handling dramatic roles, as well).
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's nothing terribly surprising about Special Forces, a moderately gripping action flick about a group of commandos on a mission to rescue a pretty blonde who has been abducted by the Taliban. Nothing, that is, except that it's French.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    They're enough to elevate the film above its somewhat by-the-numbers plot and add a little juice to its slightly sluggish forward momentum.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Alex Cross isn't meant to be analyzed too deeply. The title character probably sums up the best strategy for appreciating the film's modest pleasures when he says, "Don't overthink it; I'm just looking for a bad guy."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Smashed never really rises much above the level of a dramatic public service announcement. That's not so much because of its tone, but because what it's announcing isn't exactly news. Alcoholism is a disease. Alcoholics aren't bad people. Quitting is hard.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A martial-arts ad­ven­ture with more video-game and comic-book DNA than the traditional kung fu flick, Tai Chi Zero is good, if empty-headed, fun.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's lots of extraneous plotting -- which, however fact based, is handled in such a pre-fab manner that it feels phony.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Watchable, if cliched.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Emphasizes action and eye-popping visuals over emotion.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ultimately, the problem with this Red Dawn is the same problem with the first one. Despite the more realistic battle scenes, nothing in it feels more fateful than a football game.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The relationship is the best thing about the film, which otherwise feels hopelessly sad and tawdry.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's more waiting than lightning in Waiting for Lightning, a nonetheless watchable-enough documentary about the preparations leading up to professional skateboarder Danny Way's historic 2005 attempt to sail over the Great Wall of China on a skateboard.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film's title suggests the wry irony of hindsight: We've come a long way, baby, but we're not there yet. Any Day Now could do with a little more of that astringent humor and a little less sap.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Overlong, unnecessarily sex-obsessed and downright nasty at times, This Is 40 feels haphazard and unfinished, despite a few moments of laugh-out-loud humor.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away has plenty of eye candy... What the movie lacks, unfortunately, is coherence.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Parker the movie, like the man, delivers exactly as promised.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    His screenplay for Beautiful Creatures is sharp and witty, considering the needlessly complicated source material. His cast is stellar, and the chemistry between his young stars magical. But too much of rest of the movie, like Thompson’s monstrous mother, is an unholy mess.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie builds a moderate, if less than monumental, level of spookiness, regardless of your ignorance. It’s a workmanlike piece of suspense.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In Upside Down, writer-director Juan Solanas takes the gimmick about as far as it can go, rendering the metaphor of longing and separation in effective, and richly visual, terms. If anything, however, he goes too far.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    More stomach-churning than soul-chilling. The list of on-screen atrocities includes attacks by nail gun, electric carving knife, chain saw, shotgun, crowbar and chunk of ceramic from a broken toilet tank, used as a crude bludgeon.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s a little too much happening in the film’s violent, frenetic conclusion, which involves the retrieval of fractured memories, the confession of betrayals and so many narrative loops within loops that the film’s big reveals never make perfect, deeply satisfying sense. Maybe it’s not supposed to.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The people of 2022 may “release the beast” by slaughtering their fellow Americans. In 2013, that’s still what we go to the movies for.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The odd and disturbing thing about the film is just how comfortable [Mancini] — and we — have become putting moments on camera that, once upon a time, were meant to be shared between two people.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Artist and the Model isn’t about much, other than female beauty. That theme is not exactly controversial. Chalk the tameness of the subject matter up to the period in which the film is set.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the marquee names and their obvious talent, the film feels like a made-for-TV movie. It’s slight and episodic, with a weirdly scrupulous ambivalence about its subject, whom it seems torn between loving and loathing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is less a look into the Fed’s head than a presentation of its history, going back even farther than its creation in 1913, in response to a series of early 20th-century banking panics.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The plot itself is predictably divorced from reality, containing more holes — and smelling staler — than month-old Swiss cheese. All of which means that Stallone and Schwarzenegger end up having to do all the heavy lifting.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In structure and concept, the film resembles the faux-documentary “Borat,” with the distinction that the cameras here are all hidden. And that is where the film falls down and can’t get up.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Hiddleston steals the show here, making wickedness and treachery look a heck of a lot more fun than virtue.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Concussion suffers from a chilly detachment that feels all too clinical, when all we want, like Abby, is connection.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Isn’t Statham’s best — or most brutal — work, but it’s not bad.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    If it touches on notions of scientific arrogance and the question of what makes us human, it ultimately does so lightly, and with a mix of eye-popping action and loopy good humor.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like Father, Like Son grows on you, subtly and over time. Just as with the unexpected realignments forced on its characters, it may be difficult to fall in love with the movie, but eventually you do warm up to it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you go in with the right attitude, there’s a fair amount of fun to be had from In Secret, considering it’s a musty French costume drama done in plummy English accents.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Prime Ministers: The Pioneers is hampered by a static structure that relies too heavily on a single voice.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Berry’s performance, although less campy and histrionic than the trailer makes it look, is still outsize in proportion to the material, which feels slight and insubstantial despite its basis in a true story.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Even if you’ve never heard any of this back story — let alone anything about Mine That Bird — the outcome of the film is never seriously in doubt. That leaves filmmaker Jim Wilson in the predicament of having to entertain us by showing how the horse and his handlers get their act together. Unfortunately, 50 to 1 never really does that.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It does exactly what its subject didn’t do: toe the line.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a movie about exploring the vast, “dark continent” of the ocean’s deepest places (to quote Cameron, who produced and narrates the film) that ends up feeling claustrophobic. Much of it was shot inside a metal sphere the size of a fitness ball.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Life of Crime feels like a rambling car ride through the countryside with friends. The scenery is great, and the passengers are diverting, but you keep wondering where the driver is headed.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    This adaptation of Agota Kristof’s 1986 novel is impossible to take literally, yet too obscure to read between the lines.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though Ouija starts off evoking a nicely eerie atmosphere of dread, it ultimately goes too far, making the liminal space between the spirit world and this one all too eye-rollingly literal.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie's half over before it really starts to whack at the funny bone.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Unfortunately, the actors seem overqualified for their parts, delivering earnest monologues that come across as clumsy transplants from the proscenium stage.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cumming manages to keep the film's pandering in check with every wicked raised eyebrow.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    A fairly straightforward, if preachy, tale about environmentalism.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cletis Tout is both in love with and able to laugh at the conventions it adopts, which is exactly where it goes wrong. It's just a little too self-satisfied.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Really nothing more than "Clueless" redux but without the edgy, knowing wit.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Benign but forgettable sci-fi diversion.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Lee's understated performance is a small treat.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Never asks its target audience of self-referential baby boomers and their littles bundles of joy to take it more seriously than it takes itself.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Wastes no time getting very loud and very silly and never really lets up.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    A dramatization of the life of Christ that takes as its script a word-for-word translation of the Gospel according to John, the adaptation is not so much tedious as pointless.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cedric the Entertainer is the best (and probably only) reason to take this "Vacation."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    What little grace there is in Living Out Loud (and there isn't much) is all in LaGravenese's script, not on the screen.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    When the danger subsides and the sparkless romance returns to the foreground, the vehicle comes sputtering back to earth with a thud, weighed down by the inertia of its leaden leading lady.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    As filmmaking, it's a bravura performance, but as a film, it falls flat.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    All foreplay and no climax.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Another film about . . . a cretinous, grating loser.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Introduces us to many who have known, worked and tangled with the man some call Bush's "co-president" during his multi-decade involvement in Republican politics.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Pretty slight, but for a campaign commercial -- which is what it feels like -- it's pretty long.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    I remained strangely dry-eyed up to the final shot.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    The bad news? The story, which rumbles along like an unattended wheelchair on a gently sloping sidewalk.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    A little more literary than lifelike, House of D is a story that feels too pat, and too perfect, for its own good.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ultimately one flat-footed beast.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Think of Phoebe in Wonderland as "A Beautiful Mind," only for kids. And with Elle Fanning, Dakota's little sister, in the Russell Crowe role of the gifted outsider, tormented by demons within.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Misbegotten buddy-bonding comedy of errors.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    My only question is this: In the context of these by-the-book pratfalls, is it funny enough?
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Michael O'Sullivan
    Scrat's annoying ubiquity -- is just one piece of evidence that Dawn of the Dinosaurs has been focus-grouped and is now trying to please its presumed young audience a little more than is healthy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    Planet 51 is cute, but it's no "Shrek."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, Daybreakers doesn't really want to make anyone think too hard. If that were to happen, they might stop to wonder why all the human survivors out there hiding in fear of their lives don't just become garlic farmers and call it a day.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's so much pluck and gumption on the screen you can smell it. Flesh and blood? Not so much.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    This "Holmes" is just about as silly as it awesome. At times, Ritchie and company try so hard to make sure this isn't your father's "Sherlock Holmes" that it comes across as, well, cartoonish.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a performance in search of a movie.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    In attitude, if not aptitude, Robert Pattinson in Remember Me comes across like a latter-day James Dean.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    Jonah Hex may not be the longest 81 minutes you ever spend, but it might well be the most tedious.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    As Balthazar, Cage doesn't disappoint. He's just manic enough to keep the character from becoming too predictable.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    Charlie St. Cloud, like its star Zac Efron, is a gorgeous, unblemished thing. Both would be much improved with a tiny flaw or two.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    So light and airy, it almost floats away on its own breeziness.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a highbrow romantic farce, without the laughs.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    No ordinary horror film. If it were, it might be a bit better than it is. As the movie stands, it's a less-than-compelling relationship drama, with aliens.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    Boasting a plot that's heavy on the magical shenanigans, this pretty and poetic adaptation of Shakespeare's play is a fantasia for the smart set, a literary novelty for anyone who wants to have fun without giving up food for thought. On that score, at least, it delivers, in spades.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    You can't fault the filmmakers for reshaping a diary into a cohesive film. You can however, fault them for taking one of the great antiheroes in preteen literature and turning him into, well, an even wimpier kid.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    You can't criticize it for false advertising.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    The swells of inspirational storytelling sometimes threaten to swamp the underlying inspirational story.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    The problem is, the movie doesn't really care if we are laughing with it or at it.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    There Be Dragons is like fine wine, served in a Big Gulp cup. A little is very nice. A lot is way too much.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's heartwarming. But the film never really takes fire.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's no sense of perspective here.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film's real problem is that it can't seem to make up its mind about whether it wants to frighten us or make us laugh.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    The argument in Amigo is so heavy-handed - and its execution so crude - that by the time the movie winds its way to a predictable but uninvolving conclusion, nobody will be listening anymore.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    Here's a better title for Griff the Invisible, a well-meaning but unengaging love story about two 20-something misfits: "Griff the Implausible."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    Worse yet is the insincerity of the film's central performances. Too cool by half, Glodell, Wiseman and Dawson speak every line as if it had air quotes around it. In fact, the entire movie feels as though it has air quotes around it.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    I've got another portmanteau word for the movie: unbelievaballistic.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    Blackthorn feels less like a proper sequel to "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," which it purports to be, than a coattail rider.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    When all is said and done, Mike proves to be not only peripheral to the main thrust of the movie, but a drag on its momentum.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    A cautionary environmental tale with a thin veneer of entertainment on top. With its cotton-candy-colored palette of orange, pink and purple truffula trees, it looks like a bowl of fuzzy Froot Loops. But it goes down like an order of oatmeal. Sure, it's good for you. It's just not terribly good.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    If it's art, it's only mildly interesting.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    The story is maddeningly oblique and incomplete, despite paying what at times feels like excruciating attention to the minutiae of a dying love affair's final hours.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    An aggressively crass - and not especially funny - trip down memory lane, an attempt to recapture the sweetly ribald magic of the earlier film. As anyone who's ever attended a class reunion can tell you, it almost never works.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    Enjoy it, in moderation. It's your recommended weekly allowance of schlock.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    The acting by Binoche and her two young co-stars is more nuanced than the film deserves. They bring a rich expressiveness and sense of complex inner life to their characters. It's the movie - and its placard-sized message - that is more two-dimensional.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    A blandly middling crowd pleaser.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    This third outing climaxes with a dark and melodramatic twist that, while adding a layer of nuance and back story that the previous two films never had, also feels wildly out of sync with its audience's expectations.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's a nagging question at the heart of Chernobyl Diaries. It isn't what, or who, is stalking these kids. After awhile, the answer becomes apparent, leading to a denouement that, while mildly exciting, feels like a ride you've been on before.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's just that Pattinson's performance is so enervated that his Georges Duroy comes across as something of a cipher. He's not quite alive, yet also clearly not dead, given the amount of sex he has. He's undead, or at least uninteresting.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's like "A Midsummer Night's Dream" in the Catskills.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    A giant disappointment. It's as bustling as its titular city's piazzas, but it goes nowhere.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    D'Souza makes it all sound almost plausible, but only if you're predisposed to believe that Obama hates America. It's bashing, all right, but with a velvet-gloved fist.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    The hero of Sinister is almost unaccountably dumb. So, unfortunately, is the movie.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    For those with no vested interest in this protracted and supernatural soap opera, but who do care about cinema, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -- Part 2 will be, unsurprisingly, a silly and somewhat cheesily made waste of time.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    Dull and repetitive, even by the standards of an already repetitive genre.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's something dead and rotting at the center of Mama, and it isn't the ghost of the woman who lends the horror film its title.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cute without being especially clever, Warm Bodies is almost as pallid and as brain-dead as its zombie antihero.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Too scary for very young children, yet too silly for most older fans of director Bryan Singer’s earlier forays into the Superman and X-Men franchises, “Jack” seems designed to appeal to a very narrow, and possibly illusory, demographic: the mature moppet.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Stoker plays out like a Kabuki “Macbeth”: gallons of style slathered on a story you already know by heart.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a mushy and unsuspenseful melodrama.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Clocks in at close to two hours. It feels much longer. By comparison, Malick’s World War II epic “The Thin Red Line” tipped the scales at a whopping 170 minutes. But at least that 1998 film had people shooting at each other. There’s no such excitement here.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is so thick with Jobs’s career highlights and lowlights that there’s little room for insights.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    A bustling, overly busy mess.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s exhausting. It’s also not particularly funny or engaging.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s some fun to be had, as long as your idea of fun includes being grossed out.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Capital is too cynical to ever really suggest that redemption is possible. Not that anyone watching will even care.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    If for some reason you find yourself in a theater watching the martial arts adventure Man of Tai Chi...feel free to take a nap during the non-fight sequences.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is probably of interest only to those viewers who, like Gondry himself apparently, already have an obsession with Chomsky.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    This sharp left turn takes the films’ mythology in strange and not entirely satisfying new directions, including a crazy time-travel element.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    What’s missing here is something, or rather, someone, to care about.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    3 Days to Kill feels like two very different movies, neither of which is particularly good.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Sabotage doesn’t exactly glorify violence, but it certainly does get off on it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Bening and Harris are great actors, and they fill their roles as completely as they can, given the limitations of the soggy and implausible script by Matthew McDuffie and director Arie Posin.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    The real trouble with Transcendence is that it just isn’t all that scary — at least not in the way that it wants to be.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Visually, Brick Mansions is a duller and more conventional film than “District B13,“ which was, if nothing else, a sourball-flavored form of eye candy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Signal has visual style to burn. And it takes good advantage of the current state of paranoia arising from our surveillance culture and the pervasive mistrust in government. On paper, this sounds like a good formula. If handled well, it could really pay off.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ozon has created a monster that he can’t seem to let go of. Isabelle doesn’t just frighten her mother (and us). She seems to terrify Ozon, and I’m not sure I want to know why.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    The question at the heart of Deliver Us From Evil, a garden-variety serial-killer thriller tarted up as an exorcism drama, is not whether good will triumph over evil. Rather, it’s this: What in God’s name possesses good actors to make dreck like this?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ironically, When the Game Stands Tall isn’t about keeping gridiron glory in perspective, but about blowing it out of proportion.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a lazy piece of work, even by the low standards of Hollywood horror movies.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Tusk seems to harbor no grander ambitions than to create a gross-out gag.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    There are no surprises here, only blandly reassuring homilies.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film isn’t awful. There are moments of handsome cinematography and occasional effects that both frighten and impress.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Watching Addicted is like eating Cheese Whiz straight from the jar. There’s no nutritional value. It’s kind of embarrassing. But it does satisfy a base craving for cheap, immediate sensation.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Rudderless is a competent, well-acted melodrama, yet in scope and ambition it has the modest and serviceable scale of the small, not silver, screen.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    So rich in processed sugar, canned sentiment and schmaltz, I thought I was going to throw up.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    What is perhaps most disappointing about this ham-handed film, though, particularly since it was directed by the screenwriter of the righteously raging "Thelma and Louise," is its crypto-misogyny.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although filled with fey, flamboyant characters, the stereotype of the gay hairdresser seems to have been meticulously expunged.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    This latest, utterly gratuitous chapter in the saga of the wisecracking reptile hunter will add nothing to the ever-dimming reputation of the Subaru pitchman.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Will satisfy only those who can't tell the difference between the good, the bad and the ugly.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Made me feel like a Christmas goose being fattened for slaughter. Its force-fed diet of whimsy cloyed long before the eagerly anticipated romantic payoff arrived to put me out of my misery.
    • Washington Post
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Simply painful to watch as the doomed vehicle it's trapped in comes whistling toward a fiery crash landing.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Functional but tiresome.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The psychologizing in Party Monster never goes deeper than what you might get out of Dr. Phil on a bad day.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The notions of the good man's complicity through inertia and of innocence tarnished by association are ones that have been more powerfully explored before.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Someone forgot to remind Duvall to write an ending.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's so over the top, the top isn't even visible in the rear-view mirror.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    A protracted and only sporadically imaginative menu of ways to be murdered.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Did I laugh? Yeah, I did, half a dozen times. Not a great percentage for a film with something close to 300 quote-unquote jokes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Unfortunately, the experience of actually watching the movie is less compelling than the circumstances of its making.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    One overly busy (not to mention shopworn) story, which regurgitates everything from H.G. Wells's "The Island of Dr. Moreau" to the herky-jerky monsters of Ray Harryhausen to James Bond to "The Mummy."
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Moves at a glacial pace.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The parodistic romantic comedy makes the fatal mistake of so much middlebrow satire: It becomes that which it mocks.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    This time-travel scenario is by now shopworn, and the normally riotous Lawrence, a manic and gifted clown, is hamstrung in his efforts to eke humor from the anemic script.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Audiences who have avoided the multiplex these last few years because of the garbage peddled there are the only ones for whom this overly familiar "Walk" will be memorable.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    If this garbage sounds like your kind of thing, and the folks who jump up and talk back to the screen are your kind of people, then, sweetheart, you and this movie deserve each other.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film doesn't even cut it as cheap escapism.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The title (which translates, essentially, as "burned out") is an apt description of the film itself: a hot and smoldering shell.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Torpid, syrupy melodrama from the Chinese director of 1993's "Farewell My Concubine."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Easy on the eyes and hard on the head, Suriyothai is absolutely unaffecting where it matters most, in the heart.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    An offering so endearingly lame it seems to have missed the past 10 years' worth of special-effects breakthroughs.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Less a movie than a meticulously, tediously accurate Civil War reenactment committed to celluloid.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Really two movies in one, and there's not enough breathing room for both of them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Not enough to keep this celluloid ship from sinking under the weight of its own stupidity.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The 20th-anniversary sequel to the groundbreaking horror film-and the sixth in an increasingly awful series about the bulletproof murderer Michael Myers-is a styleless and predictable affair.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    A soundtrack buried inside a sitcom.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's less a children's movie made for contemporary children than a children's movie made for people who still remember, and pine for, how children's movies were made 50 years ago.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite its impeccable acting and subtle backdrop of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, The Event lets its message overwhelm its emotion.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film stars Bruce Campbell of the "Evil Dead" series as Elvis in a touching, funny and at times grotesque performance that is actually the best thing about the movie.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Beyond mawkish, Radio would be harmless twaddle were it not for the offensive depiction of its hero, the real-life James Robert Kennedy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    What's strangest, though, about Die Mommie Die! is how material that was obviously so giddily irreverent in origin became so inert, so joyless and dull.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a silly, if simultaneously deadpan and stomach-churning, psychological portrait of one crazy lady.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Needless to say, in the age of inferior remakes, this would-be homage -- a sort of Wim Wenders Lite -- is a mawkish debasement of its source material.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Brit actors can't even be bothered to speak with French accents.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    With the exception of a few dazzling special effects and a digitally enhanced camera move or two... it's also a towering bore.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Offers little in the way of originality, real excitement or even genuinely transgressive behavior.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    A film so boring, unsexy, styleless, sluggish and physically ugly that its badness seems almost intentional.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is so anemic you should probably order iron supplements with your popcorn, its plot so predictable it makes falling dominoes seem like a white-knuckle thrill ride.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a silly, giggly piece of pink-colored fluff, as hyperactive as its heroine and as redolent of bubble gum and Love's Baby Soft cologne as Lola apparently is. Yet the superficial sweetness masks something rotten.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Set against "Mooseport's" backdrop of ramped-up whimsy -- and not the kind that charms, either, but the kind that gets old faster than uncovered cheese -- Romano just kind of disappears.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Gives new meaning to the word "obvious."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's hard to say exactly what the point is to this sour tale.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Nosedive it does, abandoning all pretense of style and eccentricity for at-times laughable predictability and a parade of unconvincing red herrings straight out of Murder Mystery 101.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The filmmaker drowns his trademark edgy stew of smutty humor, stiff acting and dime-store insight into human nature with a gravy of glutinous bathos, making for a singularly unpalatable dish.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Comes across less as a fully realized work of storytelling than as a commercial for a corporation whose goal of entertainment has been replaced by that of making money.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Actually underserves its star, who is better than schlocky material like this would lead you to believe.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    As the film's boo! moments get spookier and more frequent, Godsend gets more and more inane.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    No movie this stupid should need a plot synopsis this complicated.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    As a whole, the film is a perplexing, dark and brooding exercise, which only makes its inappropriately cheery ending feel all the more slight.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a question of tone, which jumps back and forth between airy-fairy romantic comedy and leaden family drama with the alacrity of a manic-depressive.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    What's troubling about "My Mother" is not the way the sisters respond to the news, but the way that Paris and Fejerman have opted to make lighthearted comic fodder out of the daughters' responses.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's hard to know which is more annoying: The fact that writer-director Reverge Anselmo makes Dori's schizophrenic look like little more than a cute, sexually available lush or that he makes Mark's Marine act like a jarhead with nothing inside except fireflies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    While the younger Van Peebles certainly looks the part, Baadasssss! never feels like anything more than kids playing dress-up.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you're mocking holier-than-thou-ness, you can't very well strike a hipper-than-thou tone.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's laughably stupid, only fitfully scary and relatively harmless summer fun – if you're 12 years old, in which case you probably aren't supposed to be going to movies like this anyway.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    On the whole, it feels like a cross between a PBS special hosted by a series of low-rent Deepak Chopras and an infomercial for self-help audio tapes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie drains Cole and Linda Porter of blood and fills them with embalming fluid.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Less a tale of mysterious, tragic love than a three-way Harlequin romance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's creepy, all right. It's just that HOW it goes about creeping you out is sometimes just plain cheesy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    It becomes, after a while, little more than a mind-numbing bloodbath.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    An unfunny comedy by Tony Vitale that is enacted not by fleshed-out characters but by hackneyed, two-dimensional stereotypes. There’re so many sexual and ethnic caricatures, it’s hard to know which is most offensive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film, like the cheap double-scotches quaffed down by the central character, leaves a distinctly sour aftertaste that's hard to wash away the morning after.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    There are a couple of good things about the film, chief among which is Land's naturalistic performance. But the overall sense of it, heightened by a folk-guitar score so spare it feels like part of the soundtrack is missing, is not one of poignant minimalism but emptiness.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Collapses under the weight of its own pretension, a victim of misogyny trying to pass itself off as female sexual empowerment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ghost suffers most from a distinct lack of anything, well, cinematic.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    One hackneyed, inauthentic, predictable scene after another.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Goes nowhere fast.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    As Primer progresses, it just gets murkier and the experience of it more drudgelike.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    One singularly unbecoming character, who should, by rights, forever remain a "singleton."
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Michael O'Sullivan
    Rated PG, which must stand for "particularly gullible," it's "Raiders of the Lost Ark" for people who slept through American history class.