Michael O'Sullivan

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For 1,333 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Goodnight Mommy
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
1333 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    The second half of this nearly two-hour film is a pure delight — fast-paced and funny and filled with special effects and humor as great as any recent Marvel movie, with the possible exception of “Guardians of the Galaxy.”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Batkid would be easier to swallow if it focused less on self-congratulation than on the epidemic of unselfishness that inspired the magic in the first place.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cartel Land reveals a culture that spans the border, full of death and dismaying behavior on both sides, but thriving all the same.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Sure, there’s an undeniable pleasure from watching Pacino and Hunter work the screen, but the syrupy, symbol-heavy script by first-time feature writer Paul Logan is weighed down further by cliches and false notes.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    I, too, once enjoyed the Minions, in the small doses that they came in. But the extra-strength Minions is, for better or for worse, too much of a good thing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Artful yet agonizingly unhurried at times.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Genisys goes back to what made the franchise work in the first place: not the machine inside the man, but vice versa.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    What Polar Bear really lacks is hindsight. It is a little girl’s valentine to her father, without the benefit of bittersweet wisdom that comes with age.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Max
    Despite the overplaying, Max gets its job done, which is to celebrate the sacrifices of military dogs, while warming the cockles of your heart.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Servin and Vamos clearly have a healthy sense of the absurd, which they use, like good satirists, to highlight hypocrisy, greed and corruption.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Michael O'Sullivan
    More than a testament to the power of cinematic storytelling as food for the human spirit, The Wolfpack also is a portrait of a family that has had to rely on each other to survive.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Live From New York! is a fun, not academic walk down memory lane.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Michael O'Sullivan
    There is a quality of enchantment to When Marnie Was There that can’t be faked, and that the studio behind this animated feature is justifiably famous for.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Michael O'Sullivan
    Vikander never goes for the easy emotion, though, choosing instead to play against what conventional melodrama would dictate her reaction should be. This understatedness is always the right choice, and it makes for a far more effective — and affecting — film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    The “Insidious” franchise, after three attempts to exorcise its real demons, still can’t seem to shake what really haunts it: the ghost of B-movies past.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The characters in Aloft seem to float over their strong passions, like birds riding on columns of air, without ever alighting. I kept waiting for the sharp sting of a talon to take hold of my heart, but it never came.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    While the movie is best viewed as an examination of a specific place and time, it also can be seen as a celebration of a larger, more generic cultural phenomenon that one might call creative foment.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although he comes across as a sort of elfin crypt-keeper in this intriguing portrait by documentarian Belinda Sallin, Giger was also, quite literally, close to death.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    What happened to almost an entire generation of musicians in Cambodia isn’t a scandal. As “Forgotten” makes powerfully, passionately clear, it’s a tragedy.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The dialogue in San Andreas is lame, its plot both predictable and implausible, and the character development beside the point. Even Dwayne Johnson, that force of cinematic nature and rock-ribbed charisma, doesn’t have enough charm to dig this mess of a movie out of the rubble of cliche it’s buried in.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Michael O'Sullivan
    To call Poltergeist laughable is not the same thing as saying it’s bad (although it is that, too.) It’s just that it seems less interested in scaring you than in making you chuckle. At least on that score it succeeds.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    That we almost don’t question the plausibility of this oddest of odd couples is a tribute to the sensitive direction of French Canadian filmmaker Maxime Giroux, who wrote the relatable yet keenly observant script with Alexandre Laferrière.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie by Jean-Pierre Améris milks the tears in the home stretch, making little effort to hold the melodrama at bay. The result is a story that everyone can feel great about feeling terrible about.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    [A] meandering, deliberate and tearless — yet oddly moving — western vehicle.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    To say that there is also a monomania to the film is, if anything, an understatement. But it is precisely that sense of tunnel vision that makes Fury Road such a pulse-pounding pleasure.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Christian-themed Where Hope Grows wears its heart on its sleeve, hawking its message of salvation through faith to anyone who’s in the market for cheesy uplift and saccharine sentiment. It’s a soft sell, to be sure, but it’s salesmanship all the same.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    As she demonstrated in “The Skeleton Twins,” the former “Saturday Night Live” comedian has grown so adept at rendering troubled characters without offering sideline commentary that you can’t help but fall in love with her, even as laughter gives way to uncomfortable silence.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 12 Michael O'Sullivan
    I would call the movie a trainwreck, except it’s really four or five separate trainwrecks.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film suffers a bit for its slowness. But once you get used to the fact that this is not “World War Z,” it has its small pleasures, which are both cerebral and emotional.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Michael O'Sullivan
    Georgian writer-director Zaza Urushadze avoids histrionics or moralizing, relying on a strong cast that expresses the film’s central argument about war’s absurdity largely through taciturn action, not words.

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