Mike D'Angelo

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For 569 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Right Now, Wrong Then
Lowest review score: 0 11 Minutes
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 569
569 movie reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    For better and worse, Maysles and his team don’t impose any sort of grand philosophical thesis on these random encounters. The notion of wanting to pick up stakes and restart your life in a new location recurs throughout, but the film (which runs a brisk 76 minutes) is mostly content just to sample the populace, trusting in humanity itself to hold the viewer’s interest.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    The Wound excels so long as it hangs back a bit, watching Xolani struggle to project the authority that his role demands, despite being acutely aware of his own vulnerability.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Zero Motivation never stops being sharply funny, and there’s scarcely a hint of didacticism in its depiction of female soldiers who are essentially treated as a secretarial pool, so bored that they have to invent tasks to perform and create melodrama from scratch.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    The movie’s only real drawback is that its singleminded approach sometimes omits crucial information.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Because the actors are uniformly strong, though, and because the neighborhood itself provides such a credible context, Slattery manages to create the impression of an immense backstory that informs every interaction, making any sketchiness seem like naturalism rather than a failure of imagination.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a magnificently acrid showcase for two idiosyncratic actors who seem uncannily in tune with each other, even as their characters are out of sync.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    For every element that doesn’t work...there’s a moment that crackles with electricity and conviction.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s refreshing to see a prestige costume drama so interested in its heroine that it treats “happily ever after” as an afterthought.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    The story’s overall trajectory is familiar, and sometimes clichéd, but it still has the power to surprise and startle from moment to moment, which is what really counts.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s an unusual but surprisingly effective mix of outrageousness and sincerity, in which the four anxious revelers somehow function both as broad caricatures and as real, complex human beings.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Plympton manages to keep it lively with one stunningly kinetic setpiece after another, many of which could easily be airlifted out of the picture to function as stand-alone shorts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    The new ending Oelhoffen has dreamed up is unsatisfying—Camus’ version was sharper, nastier, more credible—and the film never strays far from genre convention, but it’s refreshing to see a sincere paean to nobility, honor, and courage, especially one that periodically elevates the pulse with expertly mounted standoffs.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Janiak handles both horror and drama ably enough to suggest that she’d excel at either genre. She hasn’t yet mastered the combination, but it’s only her first try. Give her time.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    These characters are so richly drawn, and inhabit such a precise milieu, that they deserved a less perfunctory, anticlimactic fate. The truth will allegedly set us free, but it often puts filmmakers in chains.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Following the self-importance of recent (and inexplicably prizewinning) films like Arirang and Pieta, however, Moebius feels like a giddy, playful return to form. It’s as uproarious as genital mutilation gets.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Every scene featuring Amy and Rat together is a giddy marvel of kinetic energy, with Roberts and Cusack seemingly in competition to determine which of them can make their character more unsympathetic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a welcome throwback, moving at a brisk clip and allowing its impressive cast to embody some cherished archetypes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Both Water Lilies and Tomboy explored similar material—fluctuating sexual/gender identity and adolescent heartbreak—but Sciamma’s touch is lighter and more nuanced in Girlhood, which refuses to pin any of its characters down, even in their vacillations.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Mike D'Angelo
    Broken may someday be remembered only as a minor footnote in Norris’ career, but it’s already a career worth following.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Unfortunately, while there’s enough fascinating material here for an hour-long documentary, this one runs two hours, with most of the present-day talking-head footage (interspersed throughout, to momentum-halting effect) feeling irrelevant.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Even if Cheap Thrills isn’t always plausible, though, it’s still a fair amount of twisted fun, thanks mostly to a surprisingly, effectively low-key turn by Koechner as the game’s emcee.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    First-time writer-director Jenny Deller has assembled a superb cast, with Madigan in particular making the most of her character’s no-nonsense flintiness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    On a moment-to-moment basis, A Perfect Day is reasonably engaging, mostly because of its novel milieu—there haven’t been many films about foreign aid workers, and Farías clearly amassed a wealth of anecdotes during her time with DWB. Trouble is, it plays like a collection of anecdotes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    What comes across most strongly is the genuine, overpowering love these two women have for each other, even when they’re in direct competition.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    All of the film’s constituent parts are superb (with the exception of the DJ segments, which do seem extraneous). It’s the pointedly unpointed way they’ve been assembled that gives pause.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s a pleasant, negligible wisp of a movie, notable mostly for what it suggests of its director’s potential.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Drama is driven by conflict, but in this particular case it’s the calm between the storms that captivates.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Dramatically, it’s not much of a movie, but if you just want to know how things went down, it’s certainly a more exciting précis than Wikipedia’s.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    The movie is a pleasure to look at, and often genuinely sweet, but it’s also akin to scaring the crap out of a little kid for 30 seconds and then smothering her with cotton candy for an hour. Skip the first part and you don’t need the second part, either.

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