Neil Genzlinger
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For 170 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Neil Genzlinger's Scores

Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 90 The Flag: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 The Job: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 83 out of 170
  2. Negative: 16 out of 170
170 tv reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    The main reason to watch is for its signature gimmick, a set tilted at 22 degrees, where, several times per episode, performers are imprisoned and told to improvise a scene.... There’s no describing how hysterical this is; you have to see it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    A documentary on PBS that has little to do with the war but is quietly revelatory, just as that earlier work was.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s sophisticated, well-acted television for a warm-weather series.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Neil Genzlinger
    Like some of television’s more out-there animated shows, this one is hard to describe beyond broad outlines, because it’s so odd, a combination of droll and naughty that seems improbable but works deliciously.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Treat Williams has rarely looked as comfortable as he does in Everwood, a promising new drama full of wry touches that has its debut tonight on WB. Now if he would just get rid of that annoying teenage son!
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    In Sleepyhead, the better of the two, someone is killing women by inducing strokes....In Scaredy Cat the crimes are just as bizarre, though the outcome is more predictable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The writers of the series have left themselves plenty of possibilities to explore, and Mr. Wilson seems more than capable of carrying the show anyplace they choose to take it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    A teary, perfectly tolerable collection of interlocking stories featuring lots of recognizable actors and two particularly well-etched segments.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Would You Rather ...? With Graham Norton on BBC America proves that a fair amount of fun can be generated simply by putting people in chairs and letting them crack wise.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    This Good Marty/Bad Marty dynamic may prove more fruitful for the show in the long run than the well-worn punching bag that is corporate America.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    A spunky upgrade over the collection of interchangeable police procedurals clogging the television schedule.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It's unlikely to achieve television greatness like "M*A*S*H" did, but by Episode 3 it shows signs of becoming an addictive pleasure along the lines of this season's "Revenge."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Beneath all that witty repartee, the two main characters actually have some depth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The adaption takes liberties with Stevenson's tale that some will find unforgivable. But viewers open to experimentation will enjoy simply seeing if they agree with the choices the filmmakers made in their what-if game.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    They explore the numbers behind things you thought you knew and things you ought to know, but this is no blackboard exercise.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The pilot efficiently sets up the series. All the characters who are introduced have plenty of places they could go.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The premiere episode tends to lapse into a "You go, girl" mode typical of shallow treatments of disability, with fist-pumping and treacly background music.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    This looks like a pretty tasty fantasy drama.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The intricacies may make it harder for new viewers to crack the show without doing some catch-up watching, but they also make it far more absorbing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The program may not contain any startling revelations about its five principal subjects, Cornelius Vanderbilt, John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, J. P. Morgan and Henry Ford. But based on the first episode, it certainly gives them a modern-day relevance, perhaps unintentionally.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The interactions among the core four men are the key, and the likable actors playing them make most of the scenes work.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    For the most part, the flexibility that television provides is used to good advantage in The Hollow Crown to clarify the action and enhance the dynamics. Only occasionally does it feel misplaced, as in “Richard II,” when [director Rupert] Goold goes all in with Jesus imagery.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    An eclectic comedy that is smarter than mainstream fare like "Last Man Standing" but still feels like comfort food.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The program has a fair amount of feel-good filler about the bond between the dogs and their handlers, but when it comes to showing these pairs at work, it is blunt and disturbing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    Vikings is a mini-series about a band of professional pillagers with a disregard for human life and a relentless focus on gratifying material desires. So it is somewhat surprising that it is also a refreshing study in restraint.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    By the end of the second episode, this tasty show starts to reveal that it is not just another identity-swapping story. Something creepily sci-fi is definitely going on.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    The surprise is that at least from the peppy pilot, it’s possible that this might actually work reasonably well.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    We have perhaps grown to expect a certain rhythm in these accounts. A mission accomplished amid much bravery and loss. Memories of horror and heroism carried silently for decades. The Ghost Army reminds us that in a conflict as sweeping as the Second World War, not every story fits that template.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It’s a fine show, relying on slow-building tension rather than the gory shock value of series like “The Following,” and the five-episode arc now on Netflix is worth a look if you haven’t had your fill of cat-and-mouse dynamics.... Oddly, the character developed the least may be Ms. Anderson’s.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Neil Genzlinger
    It seems that international crime fighting has the same wearying turf wars as American police work and that border-crossing serial killers practice the same sorts of sadistic violence against women that domestic ones often do.... Still, Crossing Lines makes for satisfying viewing; with Mr. Fichtner’s and Mr. Lavoine’s performances it might continue to do so for the summer.