For 279 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Pinkerton's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 The Tree of Life
Lowest review score: 0 30 Beats
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 98 out of 279
  2. Negative: 40 out of 279
279 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Pinkerton
    Haneke remains, by his rules, infallible. So what? A movie in which incident is as spare as it is in Amour can certainly be great; a movie in which ideas and feelings are so sparse cannot.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Nick Pinkerton
    The film's genius is how completely it tunes in to his 
experience, delicately outlining Joey's private moments of shame, elation, despondency, and pride.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    The subjects, plainspoken and insightful, attempt to extract the objective lessons of the political past from their subjective fortunes. This struggling to untie the personal-political knot makes for compelling oral history.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    The result is a poetic documentary of quiet American surfaces and intimately eavesdropped people.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    The title almost suggests manhood as something trifling. The film, however, confirms it's a mighty hard ideal to reach.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    All of this builds into the film's last image, Elena's family finally welcomed into Vladimir's apartment, as the cautious, controlling, abstemious bourgeoisie are overtaken by the heedlessly fertile lower orders, the temporary inheritors of a terribly weary earth.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Perhaps something important was spirited away with the 20 minutes of footage shorn for this U.S. release, but the combatants are scarcely distinguishable here even before disappearing under layers of mud and guts.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Nick Pinkerton
    Better than a masterpiece - whatever that is - The Tree of Life is an eruption of a movie, something to live with, think, and talk about afterward.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    With Hadewijch, he (Dumont) endorses something like the Dardenne brothers' rugged, squalid secular humanism, offering the barrier-breaking embrace as vague alternative to Despair, Church, or Capital.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    Like Rohmer, Hong is wonderful with atmospheric effects, using whirling snowfalls to place his characters' inchoate longing in relief.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    Plumbing disquieting depth, Deep Blue Sea investigates the insoluble dilemma of romantic love: the expectation, contrary to experience, that we can or will find every quality that we want in a single person.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    No
    No uses the actual commercial material the opposition created for its anti-Pinochet campaign and—re-creating the behind-the-scenes filming—deftly appropriates mediated history for fiction.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    Greene may intend Kati's story as a quiet tragedy, but the native feeling of that's-just-the-way-it-is lethargy ("Only in Alabama can you be a home-school drop-out") is rather convincing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Pinkerton
    Unrelentingly mundane, as if made with the sole purpose of draining the topic of adultery of any prurient interest.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    An experience comparable to starting down the road with an empty sack then, over the course of the journey, having it weighed down steadily with rocks until you can't go on. But this backbreaking effect cannot be called an artistic failure. It is exactly what Tarr sets out to achieve.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Pinkerton
    An extraordinary example of both art-historical interpretation and CGI as passport to unknown lands, The Mill and the Cross, based on a book by Michael Francis Gibson, is a moving-image tribute to the still image, with its ability to "wrestle the senseless moment to the ground."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    The aura of a life lived in extremis, undergirded by faith, clings to the film. Even nonbelievers in Senna's sport and church will find it difficult to visit Kapadia's cinematic shrine without emotion.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    The imagery has all the solemn ravishment of Béla Tarr's similarly darkening "The Turin Horse" with none of the epochal portentousness, while Rivers's work owes more to Billy Bitzer than most gallery art contemporaries.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Pinkerton
    There's a human tragedy somewhere here-but aggrandized puppy-love romance and stylish revenge fantasy is all that lingers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Despite the efforts of many interviewees to seem broad-minded, Nicoara has a knack for ferreting out moments that reveal actual Romanian attitudes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    In spite of Bulger's errors of tone, the movie stands as an engaging tussle with the question of what is permissible with the excuse of art. One former collaborator of Baker's, John Lydon (a/k/a Rotten), comes up with the most eloquent absolution: "I cannot question anyone with end results that perfect."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Pinkerton
    The Dark Knight Rises is a shallow repository of ideas, but as a work of sheer sensation, it has something to recommend.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    One senses that The Guard is McDonagh's eulogy for the brusque, warts-and-all character of a passing generation of tough, working-class Irishmen, much as Clint Eastwood's "Gran Torino" was for vintage Americanism.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Pinkerton
    The finest Western you'll see this year is set in aristocratic 16th-century France, in the heat of Counter-Reformation.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Almost as much as the play itself, the rehearsals are staged; the inmates learning to act, then, are acting like inmates who are learning to act. This leads to some on-the-nose scenes in which they observe the parallels between the text and their own lives.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Pinkerton
    Our subject retains a noticeable streak of pride in his expertise, though falters when discussing the killing of women. Hoping for his own salvation, the converted killer now claims the scales have fallen from his eyes, but his executioner's hood remains in place to the end - as does the mephitic air of timeless evil that hangs over El Sicario.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Pinkerton
    More than once does To's grandiose imagism miraculously grant this rote thriller a gleam of the sublime, as in a trash-dump face-off staged as an epic field maneuver, or a campground shoot-out timed to the fickle light of the moon.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    It is not surprising that Zemeckis's handling of spectacle would be undiminished, but he hasn't lost his touch with actors, either, coaching Washington into one of his rare performances that suggests much more than it shows.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Pinkerton
    It speaks eloquently about the disappearance of most any indigenous working-class culture.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Pinkerton
    Though Submarine isn't a dull head-movie, amid the bells and whistles, Roberts seems less its star than its cameraman.