Nicolas Rapold

Select another critic »
For 370 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nicolas Rapold's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Mustang
Lowest review score: 0 Neander-Jin: The Return of the Neanderthal Man
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 370
370 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Nicolas Rapold
    The ensemble of young actresses is a constantly restless and real presence, the perspective filtered mostly through the cheeky Lale but also through the group as a loving crew.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Nicolas Rapold
    Mr. Nance turns his thought into a performance of vulnerability that’s all too relatable in its indulgences. It has heart without becoming cloying.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Nicolas Rapold
    The filmmakers record the flash of youth’s headlong energies, its bumps and bruises, and its melancholies and brilliant chaos.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Nicolas Rapold
    It’s both the best children’s animated film this year since “Inside Out” — you might call it “Outside In” — and, unexpectedly, a more stirring depiction of the deadening modern megalopolis than most heal-the-world documentaries.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Nicolas Rapold
    A master of voice-over and metaphor (the title alone has an amazing payoff), [Mr. Guzmán] sifts through essential truths and draws links between Chile’s past and present inhabitants.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Nicolas Rapold
    Mr. Takahata’s psychologically acute film, which was based on a manga, seems to grow in impact, too, as the adult Takao comes to a richer understanding of what she wants and how she wants to live.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Nicolas Rapold
    Mr. German was just as stubborn in sticking to his personal vision (and revisions) as he was innovative in his storytelling, and he’s left behind a final opus that is hard to shake.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Nicolas Rapold
    Let the Fire Burn relentlessly sustains its tragic momentum.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Nicolas Rapold
    The bravery of Ms. Baumane’s own coping methods (which some may disagree with) brings her tough-minded film to a cleareyed, forward-looking conclusion that doesn’t lose sight of her demons.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Shot with available light, the suburban rambles are portrayed so naturally that it’s hard to believe they are scripted.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Mr. Sallitt lays down a customarily restrained mode of acting (the kind that somehow seems less flat and more natural in French cinema), but it’s in the service of a rare lucidity about feeling.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Directing his first feature after some shorts, John Magary digs into his characters with fresh eyes and a sly sense of adventure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Colman's performance comes as a revelation.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Roddy Bogawa’s Taken by Storm taps that intimate, thrilling ritual of another era: picking a record in a music store, beguiled by a mysterious album cover before the needle has even dropped.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    It’s the no-nonsense filmmaking, seamlessly integrating even dreams and visions, that keeps us fixed on the bold line of the student’s trajectory, all the way through to a transcendent ending.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    A Band Called Death is more concerned with bringing out the personal connections behind their driven music than with insisting upon the group’s distinction in the perennial music history search for oddities and firsts.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    The pacing and performances are more organic than in most horror.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Though floridly written and relentlessly scored, the film's dramas are more persuasively framed than many human ones, going so far as to include multiple flashbacks.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    The director’s wide frame encompasses vast terrain from a middle vantage point, achieving views and noticing changes over time that a mere passer-by might not.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Shola Lynch’s documentary about Angela Davis, the activist and beacon of counterculture radicalism, is a snappily edited, archivally wallpapered recollection of fearless behavior in the face of an antsy establishment. But it’s equally significant as a pointed act of retelling.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    This static documentary portrait relies on the usual panning over photos and tag-team interviews, but the format, like the radio length of a song, doesn’t get in the way of its subject’s heart.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Mr. Ponsoldt ably charts a journey through the high stakes of adolescence, with both Sutter and Mr. Teller showing great promise.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Exquisitely drawn with both watercolor delicacy and a brisk sense of line, the film finds a peculiarly moving undertow of feeling in a venerable Japanese folk tale.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Throughout, the filmmakers achieve the rare documentary feat of delving into a topic from multiple angles without slathering it in adulation.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Mr. Berliner’s film bravely brings us to the edge of language and experience.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Nicolas Rapold
    Mr. Miyazaki renders Jiro’s life and dreams with lyrical elegance and aching poignancy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Nicolas Rapold
    Wiktor Ericsson’s A Life in Dirty Movies outlines this filmmaker’s work reasonably well, but, somewhat surprisingly, truly hits home with a heartwarming look at Mr. Sarno’s relationship with his wife, Peggy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Nicolas Rapold
    A deserved tribute that puts us inside the music, and the head space, of a great, lost band.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Nicolas Rapold
    Despite some conventional moves here and there and a weakness for the cult of genius, the documentary sustains that uneasy mood cast by Nas’s expression as a child on the “Illmatic” cover, sobered by experience and wisdom before his time.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Nicolas Rapold
    Mr. Gomes remains laudably faithful to his character, and Ms. Guedes’s bodily sense of languor gets across more than any crystal-clear dramatic statement would.

Top Trailers