Owen Gleiberman

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For 2,623 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Owen Gleiberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 On Chesil Beach
Lowest review score: 0 Balls of Fury
Score distribution:
2623 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Hieronymus Bosch: Touched by the Devil brings us literally closer to Bosch’s images than one could probably get in almost any museum. As directed by Pieter van Huystee, the film offers a true immersion in his artistry. But it’s also a little slipshod — an off-kilter window into the politics of the art world. It’s like a fascinating magazine feature with some missing pieces.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    As a documentary, “Olympic Pride” is a little on the staid side. The film’s writer-producer-director, Deborah Riley Draper, works in a variation on the Ken Burns style.... Yet she does an absorbing job of capturing a historical moment that was even more fraught than it’s generally imagined to be.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The Lost Arcade is an engaging minor movie, but it touches on something that’s being lost in the age of technology that’s much bigger than video-game arcades: the feeling that there’s a reason — driving and inescapable and romantic — to leave home.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    In “Mechanic,” [Statham's] a mechanic of murder, of escape, of ingenuity, of combat. He’s too good (and too badass) to be true, but that’s why we like him. It would be nice to see Statham make a movie one day that’s accomplished enough to raise his game. Until that happens, Mechanic: Resurrection will do.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Adams draws on her gift for making each and every moment quiver with discovery. The actress is alive to what’s around her, even when it’s just ordinary, and when it’s extraordinary the inner fervor she communicates is quietly transporting.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Hacksaw Ridge is the work of a director possessed by the reality of violence as an unholy yet unavoidable truth.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    As a big-screen thriller, The Girl on a Train is just so-so, but taken as 112 minutes of upscale psychodramatic confessional bad-behavior porn, it generates a voyeuristic zing that’s sure to carry audiences along.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The Lost City of Z is a finely crafted, elegantly shot, sharply sincere movie that is more absorbing than powerful. It makes no major dramatic missteps, yet it could have used an added dimension — something to make the two-hour-and-20-minute running time feel like a transformative journey rather than an epic anecdotal crusade.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    There are moments when the movie tugs at your heart, but the subject matter, because it’s so epic, deserves an even more probing and definitive treatment.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Allied is tense and absorbing, yet the film’s climactic act somehow falls short.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened is a nimble documentary made with a personal touch of nostalgia, and it should prove nothing less than catnip to Sondheim obsessives.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Magnus, it turns out, is the anti-Bobby: a fascinatingly “normalized” prodigy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    It’s bluntly cheeky, it goes on for too long, but the concept keeps on giving.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Wind River adds up, and skillfully, but in the end it’s not all that exciting. It’s a vision of the new American despair — not an inner-city movie, but an inner-wilderness movie — and it could have used another twist or two.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Hayek’s performance, by the end, grows unexpectedly moving. Yet Beatriz at Dinner is a little tidy. It seizes and charms without soaring.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    As long as Kaurismäki presents this tidy a vision (aesthetically and morally), he’ll continue to be an engagingly hermetic art-house curio impersonating an artist.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    It’s a lovingly crafted movie, and in many ways a good one, but before that it’s an enraptured piece of old-is-new nostalgia.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie takes Kornbluth’s stage show, recorded live, and intersperses it with dramatized scenes that are just deft and amusing enough to make you wish they were part of a larger indie production. Yet it all works together, as if Kornbluth was narrating and acting out the graphic novel of his life.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The new documentary Ben-Gurion, Epilogue offers a rare intimate look at what went on inside Ben-Gurion’s heart and mind.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    To the extent that Born in China is, by its very existence, a minor act of cross-cultural diplomacy, its most progressive effect is to unveil the majestic diversity of Chinese landscapes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Shot for shot, line and line, it’s an extravagant and witty follow-up, made with the same friendly virtuosic dazzle. Yet this time you can sense just how hard the series’ wizard of a director, James Gunn (now taking off from a script he wrote solo), is working to entertain you. Maybe a little too hard.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    You could call The Circle a dystopian thriller, yet it’s not the usual boilerplate sci-fi about grimly abstract oppressors lording it over everyone else. The movie is smarter and creepier than that.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    That The Trip to Spain is unabashedly more of the same is good news…but not entirely good news.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is diligent and, to a degree, absorbing — a legal/business saga that’s also the story of a family in crisis.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    It Comes at Night is a good, tight, impressive little exercise. I was held by it, but the movie, while tense and absorbing, is ultimately a tad forgettable, because it thinks it’s up to more than it is.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Mamet has a quick, spry reaction time and a gently forlorn focus that holds the screen, and she holds this movie together.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    A lightly audacious and fascinating movie (if not exactly one to warm your heart).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Cars 3 is a friendly, rollicking movie made with warmth and dash, and to the extent that it taps our primal affection for this series, it more than gets the job done.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The Journey, thanks to its buddy-movie structure, is destined to feel a little corny, but the movie gets at something real. It’s a celebration, by two splendid actors, of the art of political theater.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Rough Night, a bachelorette-party-from-hell thriller comedy that’s got some push and some laughs, despite its essentially formulaic nature, is a perfect example of why Hollywood needs (many) more women filmmakers.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The remarkable thing is that the movie acquires the quality of a time machine. You don’t just watch “Dawson City.” You step into it to and draw back a magical curtain on the past, entering a world of buried memory that’s the precursor to our own.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The strength, and fascination, of The Force is that the movie isn’t on anyone’s side. It’s cognizant of the brutality and violence that police officers, in our era, have been caught on phone cameras committing. At the same time, it’s not out to demonize the police — it’s out to capture the pressures they’re under, and to show us what their job looks like from the inside.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    It’s a highly competent and watchable paranoid metaphysical video game that doesn’t overstay its welcome, includes some luridly entertaining visual effects, and — it has to be said — summons an emotional impact of close to zero. Which in a film like this one isn’t necessarily a disadvantage.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    If it’s less punchy and original than “(500) Days of Summer,” it’s still a wry tale that deserves to be seen. Gerald keeps telling Thomas that life should be a mess, but in The Only Living Boy in New York it’s a pleasingly witty and well-observed one.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The thing you want from a documentary about his holiness the 14th Dalai Lama is the chance to get right up close to him, in the way that movies can do. You want the chance to bask in his presence and come out with a heightened sense of what he’s about. The Last Dalai Lama? accomplishes that, and with an offhand eloquence, though it’s a sketchy, catch-as-catch-can movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    A lively and appealing analog-nostalgia documentary.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Dyrholm’s performance is a powerhouse of authenticity. Her moroseness is mesmerizing, but she also gives Nico a tense intelligence, and her singing is uncanny.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    By laying on disasters with a trowel, misses the chance to sweep us up into a more elegant fantasy of primitive mountaintop terror.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    An insider nostalgia trip for graying art punks. It could have been called ''When We Were Cool,'' and it's finally so cool that it freezes you out.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In its low grade way, this blithely brutal cops and drugs thriller is an efficient hot wire entertainment.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It may seem harmless, to some, that our movies have never entirely abandoned the land of Poitier-ville, but as Hart's War demonstrates, it's an insult that they haven't.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    There are laughs to be had, yet the movie is, if anything, more strenuous than it is funny.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    You may roll your eyes a bit at the glib, transparent, indie-grunge romanticism.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    CQ
    Coppola, who has made clever music videos, including the one for Moby's ''Honey,'' clearly had a lot of fun detailing the mod cheesiness of this intergalactic period piece, though the satire would have been more ticklish if ''Austin Powers'' hadn't gotten there first.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's an okay brat movie.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    If anything, the real surprise here is how affecting he makes the Grinch's ultimate big hearted turnaround, as Carrey the actor sneaks up on Carrey the wild man dervish. In whichever mode, he carreys the movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Did Scott, too, get hooked by the 1998 Spanish film ''Open Your Eyes?'' Intentionally or not, he has made ''Overcast Vanilla Sky.''
    • 43 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    While a good deal funnier than ''Deuce Bigelow,'' is still destined to get branded, if not condemned, as ''dumb.''
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Messy and scattershot, with a plot that's little more than a dirty version of ''Flubber.''
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Displays a promise it doesn't, in the end, live up to. See it for Swinton's embodiment of unadulterated maternal will.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It seems pompous and scattershot now -- a tweaking of privileged European smugness that unfolds with a playful daisy-chain logic but has the tone of a quaint, doddering lecture.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Quills bleaches the danger -- and fascination -- out of De Sade, turning him into a kind of mad saint of ''Masterpiece Theatre'' porn.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Even as the director, Stephen Daldry, places his star front and center, he doesn't know how to highlight him.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Clever and smooth, yet, like Angèle herself (or Nathalie Baye), the film is almost too placid for its own good.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is a footnote as well, a minor reference back to the days when people yearned for a cinema that was serious and erotic at the same time.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is ''Rosemary's Suburban Baby'' without a witch in sight.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    You wish that Malena's inner life had been given as much accent as her outer charms.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Has more atmosphere than it does coherence; it's a series of floating tricks and gambits in search of a resolution. Even so, Ye's ''Vertigo'' fever is contagious.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    What the film leaves unexplained is how this joyous musical outpouring, which predated the revolution, could fare under a system with a pathological distrust of beauty.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Del Toro lays on the operatic head-trip gore, but his heavy-handed embrace of the ''Blade'' mythology allows Wesley Snipes to give more of a performance than he did in the first film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    There's no mirth, and precious little passion, left in this house.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, after a while, drifts into an all too literal parable of the limits of never leaving the house.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Much of Big Daddy looks like it was made up on the spot, but Sandler, with his bad-dog eagerness to get caught in the act of misbehaving, pulls you through it.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    There is much to look at--it's like spending two hours in Michael Jackson's Undead Neverland--but not a lot at stake.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The routines are charged, even between jokes, with anticipatory hilarity.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A world-detonation thriller, at once urgent and lazy, that benefits from its connection to current events and also, by the end, suffers from it.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The fact that Ed's life has been channeled into entertainment never achieves much tension or comic zest. That's because Howard thinks in cookie-cutter ''situations'' to begin with.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A highly conventional 2-D infomercial.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Funny? Yes, but in its slapdash way, it sounds nuttier than it plays.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The best thing in The Count of Monte Cristo is Guy Pearce's snot-nosed hauteur. He gives this scoundrel some wounded edges, and frills as well.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A truly titillating and truly convoluted tale of l'amour fou. Perhaps the American remake could be titled ''Hot Fudge Ripple Sky.''
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It would be tempting to describe the Up movies as a miracle in the history of nonfiction filmmaking, if they didn't also represent one of the cinema's most singularly squandered opportunities.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    That Griffin tells some of the most intolerant jokes since Andrew Dice Clay should hardly obscure his talent, even if it does tarnish it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The trouble with all this is that it's thin movie tinsel that, while lovingly polished, never becomes more than tinsel. The Good Thief has a glib stylishness (the rapid freeze-frames at the end of scenes signify...nothing), yet it lacks a blast of reality to balance its fable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Watching this film, one is left with the inescapable conclusion that Hitchens' obsession with Kissinger is, at bottom, a sophisticated flower child's desire to purge the world of the tooth and claw of human power. The movie isn't, finally, an argument. It's a long angry ''Boo!''
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Beneath its heavy-breathing fripperies, though, Basic Instinct is mechanical and routine, a muddle of Hitchcockian red herrings and standard cop-thriller ballistics.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Trash, but always just a little creepier than you expect.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    If there's such a thing as joyless competence, it's exemplified by the grimly sensational kidnap thriller Don't Say a Word.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A bit of a clone itself, but it's got a crackerjack helicopter chase, a semblance of a script, and a sotto voce performance by Robert Duvall as a biotech genius who murmurs sweet nothings to his dying cloned wife.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Left wing? Right wing? Center? Who cares, as long as Bruce Willis is saving the world.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Little more than a lavish, art-directed slasher movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    You giggle every so often, but you never give yourself over to the characters.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie's got bounce. Spanked along by a soundtrack that has a surprising punky bite for something aimed at 13-year-olds.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Glum and preposterous -- an operatically stilted adolescent martyr fantasy -- and yet, as staged by Coppola, it's well worth seeing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a high-octane doomsday vision built almost entirely around our sense of anticipation, and that's both its strength and its weakness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    An epic aestheticization of World War II, a movie at once bold and baffling, immediate and abstract.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a cautionary tale about the excesses of jingoist paranoia, and the folly of it all is that the more the film descends into somber liberal chest thumping, the less engrossing it becomes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    With its lyrical vision of oppression, looks, if anything, milder now than it might have before the war.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A movie's refusal to judge bad behavior can be a subtle way of trumping the audience -- a passive-aggressive form of one-upmanship.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Ritchie made a movie that never pretends to be more than a guilty pleasure of soft-core kitsch, and Madonna and Giannini (son of Giancarlo, costar of the original) achieve a lively S&M chemistry.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Half-baked Herzog, though it has twinkles of theatrical purity that remind you of when his vision was grand.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A marvel of vérité nightmare atmosphere.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    If Microsoft and Nike ever merged into one corporate megalith (MicroNike?) and commissioned Leni Riefenstahl to direct its visionary new Super Bowl commercial, the result might look something like Godfrey Reggio's Naqoyqatsi.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Nearly everything in The Big Lebowski is a put-on, but all that leaves you with is the Coens' bizarrely over-deliberate, almost Teutonic form of rib nudging.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    There are limits to how much comic irony can be wrung out of the sight of two grown men acting like complete cretins.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The picture is nearly painstaking in its traditionalism, a tale of love, war, and valor in which nostalgia for ''simpler times'' gets mashed together, almost fetishistically, with nostalgia for old movies and for the spirit of knightly self sacrifice during World War II.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A kinder, gentler teensploitation comedy, but Hartnett's Matt, at least, invites the audience to graduate to something better.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In its mingling of horniness and disgust, Tomcats attains a convoluted cleverness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    For all its music-trivia affection, High Fidelity is finally a pretty thin melody.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Payback is a thriller so mean and degraded it carries a low-down, vicious charge. Sadism is its only real subject, and its only real life as well.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Too fragmented to be much more than a flip of the finger to history; the movie, with its mostly mute characters, is too content to plod.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The songs of the South African freedom fighters were a literal call to arms. The music succeeded -- magnificently. The movie, on the other hand, is only so-so.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Carrey isn't afraid to go happily psycho, like Peter Sellers or Eminem on his funniest tracks, and that's his edge.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    We're not watching McCauley and Hanna anymore; we're watching De Niro and Pacino trying to out-insinuate each other. For a few moments, Heat truly has some.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Fails to recapture the elemental magic of Star Wars, and that, ironically, is because it represents the coarse culmination of the original film's adrenaline aesthetic.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Starts out as sentimental whimsy and ends as sentimental kitsch.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Shouldering a laconic-good-guy, neo- Gary Cooper role, Robbins never quite makes emotional contact with the audience.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Braveheart features some of the most enthralling combat sequences in years, and the excessive ferocity of the violence is part of the thrill.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    An eminently watchable B-movie nightmare.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Is it, you know, fun? At times. Yet there's a rote quality to the way this half-dumb, half-sly movie resolves itself into an intentional debauch, a pileup of villainy and heavy metal. The only California dream it leaves you with is one of wretched excess.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    After all of its sadness, a tender redemptive glow.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, for all its sincerity, becomes clinical and repetitious, though its unsparing vision of the fragility of identity can give you a shudder.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Too poky and contrived to be a good movie, but its lushly serene atmospherics, given current events, make it a pure slice of sentimental comfort food.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    There's a fair amount of filler in The Italian Job, but it all boils down to the big heist, which has been staged as if it were Fort Knox being robbed by Evel Knievel.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Evokes the intimacies of teenage girls with unusual delicacy, and Perabo's performance is a geyser of emotion.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The result is a musical that substitutes irony for pop passion, misanthropic disjointedness for lyrical flow.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A little bit obsessed with replication.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Bad Boys II proves that it's possible to pack a movie with so much popcorn that it leaves the audience overdosed.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's just a camcorder soap opera of packaged hormonal fervor -- ''The Real World'' with extra tequila body shots.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    At once brasher and more frivolous, she's a lot less compelling fighting for the welfare of lab-test animals than she was crusading for her own dignity.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A chintzy melodrama gussied up as hair-trigger combat ''reality,'' but there's no denying the vividness with which the French cowriter-director Elie Chouraqui has visualized the chaos of Croatia.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In her sassy but scrubbed way, Bynes is a real charmer, and What a Girl Wants is a likable throwaway.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    By the end, you may marvel at the film's worldly-wise wink of maturity. You may also think, Is that all?
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's an energetic stunt of a movie, and it wants to make us sweat like it's 1974.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    I've seen far worse thrillers than A Perfect Murder, but the movie is ultimately more competent than pleasurable.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As a romantic comedy, the picture is pleasant, predictable, and utterly weightless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Marcia Gay Harden is an angry vulgarian who steals shampoo off the maids' carts and bribes a lawyer to get her baby. Sayles may not have planned it this way, but Harden makes crassness as powerful as any maternal instinct.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Busch, looking like a depressed Stockard Channing, throws his tantrums with breathy ''aristocratic'' hauteur. Yet the movie winds up walking a line between put-on pastiche and kitsch passion, and Jason Priestley is perfect as a brooding lunkhead of Tab Hunter gigolo-osity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    An experience you won't easily shake.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    I kept wondering how Arcand could have chosen as his generational representative a man not just flawed in his hedonism but one so fundamentally lacking in tenderness for others.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Minghella's adaptation of the 1997 Charles Frazier novel is emotionally detached and almost too studiously carpentered: a willed exercise in mythmaking.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Along Came Polly is nothing if not a chick flick for guys.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A fable of money as the root of jealousy, discord, violence, but the film's slippery fascination as sociological exposé is the flip side of its thinness as drama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The icy whimsy of Kitchen Stories is certainly well sustained, but you don't laugh at the movie so much as wait for the joke to thaw.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The funniest moments in Groundhog Day come when Phil takes sneaky advantage of his predicament-by, say, pumping a sexy woman in the local coffee shop for facts about her past and then, ''the next day,'' using the information to lure her into bed. What the movie lacks is the ingenious, lapidary comic structure that could have made these moments fuse into something tricky and wild.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    To turn fondly remembered TV trash into a movie that knows it's cruddy -- and that isn't, therefore, quite as cruddy as it might have been -- takes a perverse pinch of talent, if not style.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Sometimes clever and enjoyable, even touching, yet too often the film makes you feel as if you're in Sunday school.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Wallace, unfortunately, writes lazy, anachronistic dialogue, and the picture is abysmally shot (by Peter Suschitzky), with a prosaic, low-budget look that never allows you to experience the enraptured majesty of a fairy-tale historical setting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Anastasia has the Disney house style down cold, yet the magic is missing. Perhaps that's because the story's somber emotional hook--Anastasia's thwarted desire for home--is asserted rather than dramatized.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Almost everything that frames the drug dealer's tale is facile and second-rate. Simply put, you don't believe it. What you do believe is DMX's cruel charisma.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The story has more holes than the bodies do, but the shocks are efficient, and Party of Five's Jennifer Love Hewitt knows how to scream with soul.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    "Risky Business" had a great opening act and then descended into contrivances. This genial cardboard knockoff is contrived from the start but gets better as it goes along.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Is any of this, you know, fun? Just barely. But I'm sure I would have loved it at 6.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The surprise -- and intermittent delight -- of Connie and Carla is the way that it taps into the everybody-is-a-star passion of the new sing-along culture.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The director-cowriter, Brian Dannelly, has great fun tweaking the way American Christianity has been born again as a commodified, suburbanized, pop-saturated belief system.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    One of those sanctifying docs that rambles when it should explore.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Sober and honorable, yet it's far from searching.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Efficient, uninspired sequel.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A routine Will Smith cop-on-the-hunt thriller at heart, I, Robot lacks imaginative excitement.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In the end, the movie says that the President's private life matters, all right -- that Shepherd should get the girl and reestablish his leadership by giving in to the noble liberal he always was inside. Even for a modern Capra fable, that's a bit much to swallow.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    I wouldn't call Catwoman incompetent, yet it has no visual grandeur, and very little surprise; you can tick off the story beats as if they'd been graphed.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Were women put on earth to be warriors? Demi Moore certainly was. The role of Jordan fits her as snugly as a new layer of muscle.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Dense, meandering, ambitious yet jarringly pulpy, this tale of big-city corruption in small-town America has competence without mood or power -- a design but not a vision.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Chris Evans is blithely likable despite a few faux-Cruise mannerisms, Basinger makes a vividly frightened yet resourceful woman in peril, and William H. Macy scores as a mild L.A. cop who lets out his inner macho.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Features a supernatural twist that is merely okay, but the film's mood of fractured anxiety and longing made me eager to see what the director, Christoffer Boe, does next.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The truth is that Undertow is like a conventional Hollywood movie operating on half its cylinders.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film evokes how homicide became the ultimate orgasm for kids who had turned themselves into zombies of flesh.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Saw
    Saw is a gristle-cut B psycho thriller that would like to tap the sickest corners of your imagination. It has a few moments of nightmare creepiness, but it's also derivative and messy and too nonsensical for its own good.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The new Alfie is so irresistible that he hardly requires contempt. Without it, the movie is little more than a feature-length roll in the hay.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Lost Highway has scattered moments of Lynch's poetry, but the film's ultimate shock is that it isn't shocking at all.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A fun-in-the-sun heist caper that director Brett Ratner stages as if he were the activities director of a cruise ship.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As someone who has warmed up to Anderson's work only gradually, I'd call this a step back for him, but I also can't help but wonder: Will he ever take that crucial step forward and stop saying, Isn't it ironic?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Worth seeing for Bacon's lived-in minimalist purgatory, but the movie soft-pedals the nature of the desires he's at war with: the fact that they will never go away.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a death-wish revenge thriller posing as a lavishly pastoral historical epic.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Emily Bergl plays the misfit heroine -- pale Goth grrrl Rachel Lang -- with a nicely sulky empathy, equal parts hurt and hope.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Has an appealing modesty, but director Juan José Campanella works so hard to keep everything soft and winsome and charming that he cushions the understatement into blandness.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It gradually loses wattage. Robertson, however, is a real sparkler.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film's most memorable performance is also its most incongruous: As Jimmy, the teen sap who falls hard for Suzanne, Joaquin Phoenix is dead-eyed yet touchingly vulnerable -- a mush-mouthed angel.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The future-shock details are witty, the sets and skyscapes spectacular. Besson may not be a good director, exactly, but he's a wizard at retrofitting cliches.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The (mild) intrigue of Travellers & Magicians is that its central figure, Dondup (Tshewang Dendup), rolls his eyes at Buddhist karma.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The snappish domestic infighting is effectively staged, yet beneath its ''raw'' atmosphere Daybreak traffics in pop-sociological clichés.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Scene for scene, the duo are in good form. Yet this is one case where more turns out to be less.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    I had a pretty good time at Volcano. The reason I didn't have a better time is that the characters aren't just schlocky, they're boring.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A bad movie so over-the-top that at moments it's almost good - or, at least, more arresting than it has any right to be.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Director John Maybury has a feel for shock rhythms, and he's skillful at keeping you guessing, but after a while you want your questions to cohere into compelling answers, and in The Jacket they don't, quite.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film's fragmentary structure, though, is suspect. It says that the soldiers find no real meaning in their combat actions, yet Gunner Palace presents the operations we're seeing in so little context, reducing them to a random hash of ''sensational'' moments, that Tucker at times appears to be exploiting the war to create a didactic canvas of manic military unease.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The best reason to see Melinda and Melinda is Radha Mitchell, who has her grabbiest role (or two of them) since she broke through with "High Art."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's nifty to behold, but about the only drama in Steamboy lies in waiting for this colossal hovering machine-monster to blow a gasket.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Scott, working from a script by William Monahan, is so busy balancing our sympathies, making sure no one gets offended, that he has made a pageant of war that would have gotten a thumbs-up from Eleanor Roosevelt.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In his curdled-butterball way, Jiminy Glick may be the most acidic showbiz send-up since Andy Kaufman's Tony Clifton. This movie, though it has its moments, is a pedestal he didn't need.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Kicking & Screaming may be a prefab cartoon out of the "Bad News Bears" cookie cutter, but Ferrell doesn't just save this junk -- he rules it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The one figure in Revenge of the Sith who taps the true spirit of Star Wars is Ewan McGregor: With his beautiful light, clipped delivery, he plays Alec Guinness' playfulness, making Obi-Wan a marvel of benevolent moxie.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The writer-director, Alice Wu, fudges a lot of the basics -- I never believed the heroine was really a physician -- but the final, proudly public girl-on-girl smooch still jerks a tear.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    For all the nimbleness of its first half and the chemical zing of Pitt and Jolie, the film devolves into a fractious and explosive mess, hitting the same note of ''ironic'' violence over and over.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    5x2
    Feminist sanctimony, it turns out, looks much the same forward and backward.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A shudder-by-numbers pseudo-J-horror gothic, full of supernatural stunts you feel as if you've seen before the movie even gets to them.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Sean Connery and Nicolas Cage inject tasty bits of personality into their roles.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A lot of thrillers have asked us to identify with assassins -- but I'd be hard-pressed to name one that makes a hitman as sympathetic, if not sentimental, as The Memory of a Killer.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Event Horizon could have used a decent script, but the director, Paul Anderson, is a stylist to watch.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As computer-generated special effects have grown more advanced, they threaten to overwhelm such minor matters as story, character, and emotion. This, however, is not a problem in Flubber (Walt Disney), an agreeably unhinged slapstick jamboree.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Even those who may agree with Cho's agenda are never allowed to forget that it is an agenda.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In Proof, Paltrow plays yet another young woman who is being gnawed at by termites of instability, only this time out, her performance, rather than startling, is merely competent: earnest and overly familiar.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Night Falls on Manhattan makes you nostalgic for Lumet's truly first-rate corruption movies, like the great, underrated "Q&A" (1990).
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The War Within plays effectively off our voyeurism, yet it has such a cloistered, American-eyed view of the nightmare of terrorism that I kept searching for the profound explanation beneath its piecemeal ones.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Spawn doesn't make a lot of sense, but the imagery whooshes by in glitzy psychedelic torrents.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Ransom has some clever and exciting moments, but in scene after scene it teases you with gamesmanship only to pummel you with contrivance.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The Crossing Guard is a work of talent and, on occasion, raw passion, but it's also a willed exercise in purgative alienation (imagine "Death Wish" remade by Michelangelo Antonioni).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    If you're going to say the unsayable and stay charming while doing so, it helps to look more like Sarah Silverman than Andrew Dice Clay.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Kids may be appropriately terrified, but to this overgrown Potter fan, Voldemort, the Darth Vader of the black arts, was a heck of a lot scarier when you couldn't see him.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Wolf Creek, an unusually crisp and boldly shot "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" knockoff, looks as ancient and patterned as a druidic ritual.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Despite the don't-look-down Olympian settings, Cliffhanger's spirit is brutal and earthbound.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's an irony too significant to ignore that the movie, which proselytizes against penning up whales in order to make them do cute tricks for humans, spends much of its time making Willy do cute tricks for humans.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    I was pleasantly surprised to discover that the new cartoon of Curious George, featuring the voice of Will Ferrell as the Man in the Yellow Hat, doesn't veer all that far from the soothing tone of the books.
    • 11 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In Date Movie, the hormones, anxiety, and princess jealousy that fuel the majority of Hollywood love stories are made so excessive that the romance itself is revealed to be...every bit as big a crock as it usually is.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Moore doesn't just act. She goes on the attack, embracing the kind of lower-rung-of-the-middle-class role that actresses from Jodie Foster to Meryl Streep have long savored. Her performance is an achievement of sorts, yet, like the movie itself, it's also strenuous and joyless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Unknown White Male is framed as a look at the mystery of identity, but there's a bizarre neutrality to the movie, since it makes Bruce's life just as detached and remote to us as it seems to him.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As Benny, a small- town Irish teenager in the '50s who goes off to university in Dublin, Minnie Driver has a touchingly awkward prettiness. Her jaw may be as square as a picture frame, but her smile lights her up from within.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Basic Instinct 2 isn't bad, exactly, but it lacks the entertaining vulgarity of the first film; it's Basic Instinct redone with more ''class'' and less thrust.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Boils down to a performance film with abysmal sound in which you rarely get to see a good, revealing close-up of the stars.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A thriller that holds less interest - and less water - the more it reveals about what's actually going on.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    This morphing of "The Bad News Bears" and a "Three Stooges" episode parades its dumbness with such zip that it almost passes for clever.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Isn't a very funny movie (it preaches nonconformity in the rote style of an overlit sitcom), but Wilson, at least, keeps it afloat.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A silly, amusing trifle.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Though the events have a rambling overfamiliarity, there's a real story between the lines: the resentment over the U.S. occupation on the part of non-insurgent Iraqis.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Gracious, if meandering.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is cranked up somewhere between stylish and proudly stupid, dusted with sunniness from Amy Smart (as Chev's sleepy girlfriend) -- and guaranteed to be out of your system by the time the lights come up.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Despite its logy, red-herring structure, the film has enough enigma and weirdness that it gradually stirs to life.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film is more than a little in love with the corruption it finds under the floorboards -- and that, of course, is perfectly dandy. I wouldn't trust a film noir that wasn't enthralled by decadence.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As a director, Mehta would do well to stop smothering her empathy in glibness (she uses the family's ancient mute grandmother as a sitcom prank), but her empathy pokes through nonetheless.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The trouble is, he's preaching to the choir -- or, at least, to a culture, profoundly influenced by Tom Brokaw's "The Greatest Generation" and Steven Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan," that has already absorbed the lesson that ''the Good War,'' while it may have been noble, was never less than hell.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The dance-film equivalent of a female impersonator: The movie is absurd and sincere at the same time-it offers an insolent facsimile of grand passion.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Cocaine Cowboys, which at times seems like it could have been edited by someone on coke, comes at you as a vast bloody river of underworld information.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The Bridge crosses a disquieting line.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    An eminently easy-to-watch piece of one-joke pop japery, is a movie that mimics the I'm-a-character-in-my-own-life metaphysical playfulness of "The Truman Show."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The hero remains such an exhibitionistically cocky, walled-off jerk that Flannel Pajamas' glib conversational ''candor'' yields no mystery. And that's a problem in two hours of talk.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Works just like a Tenacious D song. The movie feels giddy and eruptive, dopily enthralled with itself, and more or less made up on the spot.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The dialogue has a perky synthetic sheen, and with the exception of Diaz, Meyers brings out the best in her actors.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Well acted.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Venus has a swank pedigree, but in this case that doesn't mean it's much more than a quaint machine to elicit tears and awards.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Curse of the Golden Flower is a watchable soap opera, but its marching-band martial-arts scenes are little more than weakly staged retreads of the ones in Zhang's "Hero."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As Factory Girl more than acknowledges, Edie Sedgwick's downward spiral was ultimately her own doing. Yet even as the film captures the silk-screen outline of her rise and fall, it never quite colors in who she was.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    God Grew Tired of Us never brings us half as close to its subjects as the far more penetrating "Lost Boys of Sudan" did in 2004.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Epic Movie is just timely enough to conclude with a wink and a nod to Borat. I only wish that it had been bold enough to go Borat on HIM.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Neeson and Brosnan are supremely well-matched foils, though I do wish that the filmmaker, David Von Ancken, had lent his sparsely mythic tale just a twinge of something...new.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The plot, which spins around Allegra's lovers having just been an item, is awkward bedroom farce, but the tone is Woody Allen-meets-"The L Word," with a patina of literary cuteness that now seems like the sound of a vanished Manhattan.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie has a hushed sensual resonance, but it turns faith into an endurance test.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Rumble in the Bronx never quite achieves the smack-you-around zest of Chan's Hong Kong pictures. Still, it's hard to dislike a movie with such a friendly sense of the preposterous.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    But Philadelphia turns out to be a scattershot liberal message movie, one that ties itself in knots trying to render its subject matter acceptable to a mass audience.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The writers act shocked at how low they are stooping, but given their desire to write sitcoms, you have to wonder.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Blades of Glory has funny moves even when its characters can barely move, but the film seldom gets past its one basic laugh: that a real man figure-skating is a contradiction in terms.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    If it's possible to be a rip-off with wit, Disturbia qualifies.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    White Squall is lovely to look at, but frustrating to behold.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's an energetic, watchable mess.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! is seamlessly crafted yet too self-conscious to be much fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Mr. & Mrs. Bridge is watchable but also stiff and remote.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Lonely Hearts never locates the key to the killers' bloody bond.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The chintzy characters, hair-raising deaths, and one spectacular rocket-launcher joke aren't enough to give "Hostel" a run for its blood.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Spider-Man 3 has terrific moments, but after the danger and majesty and romantic brio of "Spider-Man 2," those adrenalized rooftop ballets feel, more than ever, like sequences.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Crooklyn has a warm, nostalgic, spilling-over-the-edges effusiveness that is new to Lee's work. At the same time, the movie often seems every bit as high-strung as the family it's about.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Lee, I'm afraid, hasn't a clue. He has made half a movie, a phone-sex comedy in which the heroine has no real existence apart from the phone.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Jaglom's scruffy style doesn't carry it through. He puts enough toxic insincerity on screen to singe, though.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Mad Dog and Glory turns out to be a light-spirited urban fairy tale. Despite occasional flashes of violence, its atmosphere is one of moonstruck romanticism.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    This satire of empty-suit capitalism has scalding moments, but most of it suggests Being There meets The Office gibberized into theater of the absurd.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie itself, with the exception of a few scenes, doesn't really have the wit it's aiming for, and among Steve Martin vehicles it's middle-drawer, at best. Yet that mood of silly exuberance reigns through most of the picture.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The Two Jakes is competent and watchable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film, though sleek and easy to sit through, replaces genuine dramatic involvement with a superficial, rock & roll empathy-it's as though we were watching Cruise's character and playing air guitar to his emotions. There are plenty of soulless movies around. What's special about Days of Thunder is that it works overtime trying to convince you it's not one of them.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    What About Bob? is just funny enough to make you wish it had been wilder and less predictable.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is a somber, smoothly crafted drama about a wily adolescent who senses there's something rotten going on in his country but can't quite put a finger on it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's one of those woozy Jungian art jobs, a series of elliptical, nearly wordless vignettes that are meant to strike a universal symbolist chord. Director Mike Figgis frames the movie with his baroquely contemporary documentary-like version of the Fall.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    I can't say that I've ever entertained fantasies of writing on someone's body. But Peter Greenaway's The Pillow Book (Cinepix) does, at least, succeed in making it look like an erotic activity.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Bay, at heart, isn't a fantasist; he's a literal-minded maestro of demolition.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    This digitized update, with Jason Lee as a huskier, more generic Underdog, mostly drops the doggerel, but the endearing airborne-beagle effects help to offset the formula twists.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Delpy wrote and directed this study of a relationship heading (it would seem) for the rocks. She stages it with a funny and diverting improv-y flow.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    What defines the slacker-geek twentysomething men and women who wander through Joe Swanberg's too-hip-to-be-romantic comedy Hannah Takes the Stairsis that they treat their libidos as minor accessories -- only to stammer through every casual conversation as if they were on a first Internet date.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie isn't terrible; it's just low-rent and reductive.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    This Myers is more problem child than bogeyman.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As a movie, Trade is so-so, but as an exposé of how the new globalized industry of sex trafficking really works, it's a disquieting, eye-opening bulletin.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film's argument against overly literal Bible readings may not preach to anyone but the converted, and when For the Bible Tells Me So strays from scripture, its ardent plea for sexual freedom within modern Christian life grows a bit too late-night PBS generic.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Grodin always seems like a real guy, whereas Stiller, even working it, is just the designated loser-clown of the megaplex era. He's too harmless to break any hearts.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Perry is of the spell-everything-in-capital-letters and act-it-out-loudly schools. Yet his sensitivity to women is a tonic.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The story is too patterned and too contrived.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film gets a little ''We can fix this!'' inspirational for a chronicle of such staggering darkness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Reilly, in his 70s, takes us through his hilariously awful childhood: Eugene O'Neill as toxic high camp.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Southland Tales has a mood unlike anything I've seen: dread that morphs into kitsch and then back again. It's a film that tried my patience, and one I couldn't shake off.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Director Jon Turteltaub has fun with Indian glyphs, giant stone pulleys, and an Indy Jones-worthy City of Gold located beneath the rocky shoals of Mount Rushmore.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As heavy with message as any Hollywood delinquent drama of the late '50s.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Latifah coasts on grit and verve, and Holmes has a goggle-eyed sweetness, but it's Keaton who rules.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Cyrus, an apple-cheeked dumpling, resembles Pia Zadora, but when she exhorts the crowd, it's with the martial efficiency of Hillary Clinton.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Has a loosey-goosey, what-the-hell spirit that's easy and fun to hook into.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Diary of the Dead isn't bad; it's a kicky B movie hiding inside a draggy, self-conscious-work-of-auteurist-horror one.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is a veritable scrapbook of tropes from the heyday of art film. Maybe that's why it feels gauzy and quaint. Yet time passes pleasantly.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Norah Jones, making her big-screen debut as a wistful wanderer, is a beautiful blank, and the fragments barely add up to a movie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Harold and Kumar, fortunately, never lose their verbally relentless way of delivering raunch as pure common sense.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Kutcher, who gives his most energized performance to date, and Diaz, darting between the caustic and shrill, look as if they're warming up to groovy hate sex, not love, which may be why the film goes flat the moment it turns friendly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In total effect, Prince Caspian feels a lot more earthbound than "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The director, Tom Kalin, stages acid duels, but he should have provided more psychological structure. Though Moore, a great actress, turns fury into verbal music, we're never quite sure what's driving her.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Bryan Bertino, stages The Strangers' early scenes with spooky panache...But then comes the blood, the shrieking midnight chase scenes, the anything-goes over-the-top-ness. In other words, everything that we liked the movie for not being.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The Incredible Hulk is just a luridly reductive and violent B movie -- one that clears a bar that hadn't been set very high.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Journey is just the new version of a 1950s comin'-at-ya roller coaster, with a tape measure, trilobite antennae, and giant snapping piranha thrust at the audience.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As a lissome art restorer, Asia Argento (the director's daughter) comes off as the sanest human on screen, which is pretty scary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Berlin is far from the lost masterpiece the movie wants it to be.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The writing is zippy, the story spins like a top, and Bardem turns out to be the wittiest of leading men.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Even Watchmen fanatics may be doomed to a disappointment that results from trying to stay THIS faithful to a comic book.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's basically a zombie movie with machines instead of the walking dead.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Zwick offers excitingly staged moments, but once you get past the novelty of WWII Jews acting this heroically macho, Defiance bogs down in a not very well-developed script.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As it becomes clear that Ball, in essence, has just restaged American Beauty with a socially conscious paint job, the sensationalism of Towelhead looks more and more like a dramatic tic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A throwback to the age when Westerns were quaint.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The Lucky Ones isn't dull, and the actors do quite nicely, especially McAdams, who's feisty, gorgeous, and as mercurial as a mood ring.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Seth Green is uproarious as an Amish farmer who speaks in sentences so passive-aggressive, they're like tiny slaps.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Eden lacks the technique to give its stifled domestic-erotic feelings their full power.

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