Patrick Peters

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For 61 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Patrick Peters' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 A Hard Day's Night (re-release)
Lowest review score: 40 Brothers of the Head
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 61
  2. Negative: 0 out of 61
61 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Patrick Peters
    Every bit as enchanting as you remember. Molto, molto bene.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Patrick Peters
    Make a date to catch this on the big screen and be rewarded with pure magic.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Patrick Peters
    The fact that Miyazaki and his team hand-draw the images before they're digitally coloured and animated gives them an artistry that has been woefully lacking from so many recent American features.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    It may lack subtlety, but everything is beautifully designed and photographed, Watling and Tosar are superb and it's undeniably great fun.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    This barely conceivable story of neglect and loneliness is given heartbreaking new life by Morley, with Zawe Ashton standing in effectively for the tragic young singer.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Subtle and unflinching, this is genuine and charming.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Refocused on the hoof after the catastrophic 2014 earthquakes, Jennifer Peedom's film pulls no punches in exploring the culture and work of this unheralded group, as well as their frequent exploitation by Westerners.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    An Oscar nominee at this year's Academy Awards and for good reason, Falardeau's film is moving, smart and sensitive. Terrific stuff, in short.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    This reflection on isolation, technology, creativity and desire brilliantly blurs the lines between perception and voyeurism, the objective and the subjective.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Paced with steady assurance, this gentle bildungsroman is a impressive debut from director Daniel Patrick Carbone.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Slow-paced and self-indulgent in places but a bravely intense use of camera work to explore the internal psychology of the characters.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    The breakneck pace, the seething sense of menace and the unflinching attitude to sex, drugs and violence coagulate into a nastily authentic take on the seediness and venality of modern villainy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Touching and funny. Waters fans should sign up now.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Making masterly use of sound and image, this is a desperately sad study of the difficulty people have to communicate and commit in an increasingly insular world.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    A fascinating insight into the disparity between rich and poor, and powerful nations and their less muscle-flexing neighbours. And, unless you're a fish, it's also pretty darn scary.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Intimate, delicate and delightful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Lovingly photographed in a monochrome that recalls Woody Allen’s Manhattan, this is a slickly scripted rom-com.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Like Spinal Tap's more seriously older brother, Jay Bulger's fond but unsparingly honest film is a treat for fans and music lovers. A juicy slice of rock history.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    The tone is pseudo-Sopranos at times, but the oppressive ambience is grippingly sustained.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    Stealing the show is Suzanne Flon's immaculate display as the matriarch whose good-natured indulgence of her ghastly relations belies a guilty secret. Mercilessly acute and quietly devastating.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Patrick Peters
    This arty approach may dismay hard-core horror fans, but it captures the dark grace of the original with wit and style.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Patrick Peters
    A beautifully designed but overly formal biopic that can't match the greatness of the artists it depicts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Patrick Peters
    Both women are impeccably played by Maria Bonnevie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Patrick Peters
    A compelling story told with Morris's usually flair. Still, hard not to think of it as a disappointment by the director's exalted standards and a missed opportunity to explore society's dysfunctional relationship with its media.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Patrick Peters
    The structure similarly misses the flashbacking subtlety of the original. Even the characterisation lacks depth.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Patrick Peters
    This is a gentle, camp but nonetheless revealing satire on how a nation circumvented the social strictures imposed upon it by Franco's fading fascist regime.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Patrick Peters
    The action meanders occasionally, but the performances are consistently disarming and Luciano Zito and Diego del Piano’s black-and-white photography complements the mood of ironic melancholy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Patrick Peters
    As passionate and wide-ranging as you'd hope, but disappointingly mistrusting of its audience's interest in the finer points of the case.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Patrick Peters
    Shot over three years, this is one of the more considered and insightful Iraqi documentaries - although some may find its stylistic contrasts a little self-conscious and distracting.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Patrick Peters
    Josh Fox puts a fresh spin on a well-drilled - if continually relevant - story.

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