Peter Debruge
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For 420 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Debruge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Lowest review score: 0 Pretty Persuasion
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 77 out of 420
420 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Debruge
    On the surface, each of these characters fits a familiar Latino stereotype--teen harlot, "el bandido" and male buffoon--yet the movie insists on giving each person dimension.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Ultimately, the mock-doc device works because Gyllenhaal and Pena so completely reinvent themselves in-character. Instead of wearing the roles like costumes or uniforms, they let the job seep into their skin, a feat without which "End of Watch's" pseudo-reality never would have worked.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Hoping to do for flesh-eaters what "The Twilight Saga" did for vampires, albeit on a smaller scale, writer-director Jonathan Levine spins Isaac Marion's novel into a broadly appealing date movie about a zombified Romeo and his lively Juliet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Mud
    Mud poses as a mere adolescent adventure tale but explores a rich vein of grown-up concerns, exploring codes of honor, love and family too solid to be shaken by modernizing forces.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Never before has anyone made a documentary like The Act of Killing, and the filmmakers seem at a loss in terms of how to organize the many threads of what they capture...Still, essential and enraging, The Act of Killing is a film that begs to be seen, then never watched again.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    For most of its running time, this personality-packed docu is nothing short of absorbing as it recaps the essential role African-American background singers played in shaping the sound of 20th-century pop music.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Slow as molasses but every bit as rich.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The satire is firmly seated in character, and no one understands how well a good homicide can elucidate character better than Wheatley.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    More inspired by than adapted from Juan Mayorga’s play “The Boy in the Last Row,” this low-key thriller feels like a return to form for Ozon, whose pictures lost their psychosexual edge after the helmer stopped collaborating with Emmanuele Bernheim (“Swimming Pool”).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    This rich, beautifully rendered film boasts an arrestingly soulful performance from Marion Cotillard.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    While the plot — too low-key to be called a thriller — points toward obvious extramarital cliches, delicate changes in the overall mood reveal deeper truths.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The Wolverine boasts one of the best pulp-inspired scripts yet. It’s still full of corny dialogue...but there’s a genuine elegance to the way it establishes Logan’s tortured condition and slowly brings the character around to recovering his heroic potential, methodically setting up and paying off ideas as it unfolds.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The source material may be David Sedaris (this marks the first time the essayist has allowed one of his pieces to be adapted), but the tone couldn’t be more Kyle Patrick Alvarez, who once again steers auds to some gloriously uncomfortable places.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    A film that lays emotions on the line and then drives them home with music.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    John Turturro brings sensitivity and intelligence to a subject that could have gone terribly awry in Fading Gigolo.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Of all living actresses, only Huppert could capture nuances that alternately elicit sympathy and fierce sexual attraction to a recent stroke victim.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Disguised as a drunken cartwheel through expat paradise, Mark Jarrett’s striking feature juggles questions of mortality along its rowdy cross-country path.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    With the aid of Johnsen’s doc to overcome the obstacles China has put in his path, Ai’s voice carries louder than ever before.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Racy subject aside, the film provides a good-humored yet serious-minded look at sexual self-liberation, thick with references to art, music, religion and literature, even as it pushes the envelope with footage of acts previously relegated to the sphere of pornography.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    It’s one thing to declare sex a fact of life and insist that audiences confront their unease at seeing it depicted (or, equally constructive, their intense excitation at its mere mention), but quite another to fashion a fictional woman’s life around nothing but sex. As courageously depicted by Gainsbourg, Jo is ultimately a tragic character.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Pavich does an admirable job tracking down surviving parties (except for the suspicious-sounding cast), opting for a humorous rather than indignant tone to the interviews.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Helmer Lenny Abrahamson (“Garage,” “Adam & Paul”) puts the pic’s eccentricity to good use, luring in skeptics with jokey surrealism and delivering them to a profoundly moving place.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Using Baltimore’s dirt-bike groups as its entry point, the film offers a remarkable grassroots look at how the system is broken at the inner-city level.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Everything about the three principal teens registers as deserving of “human interest” to Rich Hill’s two helmers, whose generous attitude draws us into this deeply empathetic film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Phil Lord and Christopher Miller irreverently deconstruct the state of the modern blockbuster and deliver a smarter, more satisfying experience in its place, emerging with a fresh franchise for others to build upon.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Best known as the screenwriter of such subtext-rich adaptations as “The Wings of the Dove” and “Drive,” Amini excels at conveying the subtle, unspoken tensions between characters, selecting a tightrope-risky example with which to make his directorial debut and orchestrating it with aplomb.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The pic owes its believability to Asser, who served as a therapist similar to Oliver’s character, drawing from his experience to shape the world. Asser brings more than just realism, however, crafting the central father-son relationship on the foundation of classical Greek tragedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Meticulously acted, gorgeously shot and hilariously insightful about the strange, inarticulable ways people can get on one another’s nerves, this psychological thriller takes its premise to surprising, darkly comic extremes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    The humor springs either from real-world recognition, as Robespierre and her co-writers go where others fear to tread, or in response to the cast’s lively, eccentrically lived-in characters.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Debruge
    Unlike other actor-directors, Jones never seems to indulge excess on the part of his cast. Though the characters are strong, the performances are understated.

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