For 371 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Manuscripts Don't Burn
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 53 out of 371
371 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    He (Hui) does not achieve the surreal grandeur of Hayao Miyazaki’s animated films, but he has enough imagination and talent to engage his audience on its own level.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    By the end of Tickled the realm of superficial giggles has long been left behind. Though his lighthearted tone has difficulties keeping up with each new sinister discovery, Farrier has exposed in the least likely setting the network of power and money that preys on the weak with impunity.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Frustratingly elusive and seductively louche, Lespert’s “Yves” probes a cryptic myth and a fragile soul, penetrating neither, but conjuring up a taste of Saint Laurent’s suffering, genius and style.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In addition to being very funny, In a World . . . also makes a case for women to be, well, heard. But in terms of cohesion and narrative, it doesn’t quite come together as a movie.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    What Stranger by the Lake lacks in suspense and back story it makes up for in atmosphere: It’s a subtle exercise in the pathetic fallacy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Filmmaker Joe Berlinger isn’t so much inspired as disgusted by the notorious gangster in his newest documentary.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The coming of age is not just that of character but of a whole nation, and despite the mild-seeming moniker, the Jasmine Revolution earned its victories the hard way.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like other offbeat and original efforts such as Spike Jonze’s “Her,” Jonathan Glazer’s “Under the Skin,” and Richard Ayaode’s dour “The Double,” it juggles genres, reverses expectations, and resorts to fantasy in order to explore the enigmas of gender, identity, and love.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Silva doesn’t resort to any fancy tricks to depict his characters’ inner experiences. But something happens nonetheless, a bonding of sorts that is almost, if not quite, convincing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    But when Dark Horse leaves the feel-good realm to show news footage of a failed miners’ strike, or to have the camera linger on the impoverished surroundings where Dream Alliance’s owners still dwell, it suggests that it will take more than a few fairy tale finishes for their reality to change.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though the narrative of “Marnie” bogs down toward the end, this does not diminish its spell.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Alain might not have the very particular set of skills of Liam Neeson’s character in “Taken” (2008), but he does have the perseverance of John Wayne’s Ethan Edwards.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Some of Tarantino’s taste for brutish resolutions seems to have slipped into her otherwise nuanced, sensitive, and unflinching adaptation of this YA novel by French author Anne-Sophie Brasme.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In short, the film inserts us into a solipsistic universe of Norman Lear, one that also overlaps many of the most significant social, political, and show-biz issues of the second half of the 20th century.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The result is an extended home movie that is also a sociological experiment.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    This is no exercise in miserabilism. Instead Moverman and Gere take a problem and elevate it into a universal experience, turning social issues into existential insights.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    This is not “Rain Man”; it’s better.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    It takes a personal rather than a political perspective, exploring the ambiguities of truth and individual identity rather than the complexities of an ongoing historical calamity. And though the human drama is hypnotically gripping, it comes at the expense of the bigger picture.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In person, as seen in Fifi Howls From Happiness, Mitra Farahani’s ambitious and self-reflexive documentary of the artist’s last days, Mohassess enthusiastically acts out those traits. It’s a performance enhanced by his diabolical, phlegm-choked laughter at his own bleakly ironic pronouncements and denunciations of the world in general.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Dark Horse falls into the formula of underprivileged kids challenging the elites at their own game. But the outcome is never certain.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    This walkabout ends less dramatically and not as tragically as the one in Roeg’s film, but perhaps with a greater poignancy. And Gulpilil, four decades of hard living later, is as magnificent as ever.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Whether unclassifiable and inconsequential oddity, or overlooked key to the meaning of life, or both, The Creeping Garden is the slime mold of documentaries.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As played by Fiennes, who has the aquiline face and piercing eyes of Max Van Sydow, Clavius is no pushover. You believe his disbelief, so when it wavers, yours might as well.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As remorseless in style as it is in message, In the Fog offers little hope and few pleasures, but earns admiration for its elegant exploration of the lowest depths of the human condition.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Only occasionally, as in “Thank You for Smoking” (2005), do these men — and the audience — understand that bucking the system doesn’t always make you less a part of it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    His (Hawke) subtle performance also draws attention away from the creaky plot machinery, as does the Spierig brothers’ eye for the seemingly throwaway but pregnant detail.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Despite outstanding performances, the characters lose subtlety as they grow more extreme, and their secrets when spelled out become anticlimactic. Maybe with a little more mystery, the evil would seem less banal.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Not known for subtlety, Besson gets the expected laughs, and then some. He also exercises an unwonted finesse, not only with the allusions, but also with variations on the “f” word that, if not poetic, are at least funny.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    True, a lot of marmalade gets spread around, and at times the zaniness gets a bit too slap-sticky, but it’s all good clean fun.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    '71
    Churns out dread, suspense, and hellish splendor with its derelict cityscapes and breakneck action.

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