For 203 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Manuscripts Don't Burn
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 35 out of 203
203 movie reviews
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Almost all mainstream movies steal from other movies, but the better ones get away with it because they possess some distinctive identity. The best that Ken Scott’s Unfinished Business can come up with is Vince Vaughn — as the straight man.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Unfortunately, though, Rossato-Bennett and Cohen seem to think that the technique is a panacea. In fact, it is not even original, as music therapy in nursing homes has been around for some time.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Puzzle is neither puzzling nor much fun. It reminds you how much better Julie Delpy told the same story in “2 Days in New York.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    For the most part, Fluffy’s material is just that — fluff, with a touch now and then of bile and bad taste.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    The film is so bizarre, contrived, manipulative, and meretricious that anything is possible.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Here Aniston suffers every manipulative cliché and contrivance in the tearjerker playbook. She works hard, and it’s painful to watch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    If nothing else, Beloved Sisters is one of the most visually striking biopics around. Too bad you have to wade through so much verbiage in order to enjoy it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    It’s a big deal for the NFL and ESPN, no doubt, and Draft Day serves as 110 minutes of product placement for both.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Isn’t fate a funny thing? Especially when Nicholas Sparks makes it up. Filmmakers love to adapt his stuff because he puts together narratives riddled with contrived coincidences and implausibilities meant to seem like the workings of providence when in fact they are the creations of a hackneyed mind.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    “You don’t need a man to define you!” Very true, and so much for feminism. The rest of the film takes a long, convoluted, predictable, and mostly unfunny route to prove that the opposite is the case.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Joe
    Joe is one more in the line of Southern Gothic miserabilism that includes “Winter’s Bone” and “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” films that many have praised but some find condescending.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    The problem with high concepts like this is cooking up a story and characters to go along with it.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    If you close your eyes you’d think it was a commercial for a “Great Love Songs” DVD collection.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Grown Ups 2 offers a bittersweet paean to childhood and youth and their inevitable loss. Take the case of Adam Sandler. Didn’t he use to be funny?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    This movie doesn’t make the case. In fact, had they upped the absurdity a notch, it would rival the comedy of Christopher Guest’s let’s-put-on-a-show mockumentary, “Waiting for Guffman” (1996). As it stands, it plays like an infomercial.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    One thing you have to give Bay credit for: He has a knack for bringing A-list talent down to his level. Like Mark Wahlberg, Oscar nominee for “The Fighter” and “The Departed.”
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Despite such attractions as Gabriel Byrne as a vampire with a skin disease and a décor that combines Hogwarts with “Suspiria,” the only lesson learned here is that Hollywood needs fresh blood.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Somewhere between John Cassavetes’s “Husbands” (1970) and “The Hangover” (2009) you will find Last Vegas. Not necessarily a bad place to be, except the film unfortunately has the madcap hilarity of the former and the emotional intensity of the latter.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Misogynistic, homophobic, scatological — none of these words come up in any of the spelling bees that take place in Jason Bateman’s directorial debut, but they apply to the film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    The Quiet Ones simply has nothing to say.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    As for the dialogue, although the characters talk really fast, swear a lot, and overlap their lines, what they’re saying isn’t very funny or authentic. It’s as if David Mamet collaborated on writing an episode of “Two and a Half Men.”
    • 41 Metascore
    • 12 Peter Keough
    As a five-minute sketch it would have been so-so. But as a 93-minute slog through witless puerility, it seems like an eternity in hell, baby.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 12 Peter Keough
    Stunningly insipid and pretentious.

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