For 163 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Manuscripts Don't Burn
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 92 out of 163
  2. Negative: 26 out of 163
163 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The government, even under the new, more moderate leadership of President Hassan Rouhani, has reason for concern. Unlike Rasoulof and Panahi’s previous, more metaphorical films, this one confronts its subject head-on with unflinching candor.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Through patience, skill, discretion, and trust, Jesse Moss has taken a seemingly small town story and turned it into both a microcosm of today’s most urgent issues and a portrait of a single suffering soul.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It is part Rorschach test and part theme park ride as the filmmakers shoot from the strangest places and from such odd perspectives that much of the film consists of trying to figure out what the heck is going on.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Burshtein has achieved a gripping film without victims or villains, an ambiguous tragedy drawing on universal themes of love and loss, self-sacrifice and self-preservation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though “Berberian” bogs down a bit in its infernal spiral, Strickland proves himself to be a rising talent — a master of sound and fury both.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Bernstein communicates Ungerer’s manic spirit and his irrepressible creativity by punctuating the conventions of talking-head interviews and archival footage with animated snippets of Ungerer’s thousands of illustrations.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The world of cinema is richer for the voice of Al Mansour; she speaks for the women of her country, and for people everywhere.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    This sounds like it could be austere and schematic, but the affecting, authentic performances from the first-time actors make these characters thoroughly authentic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In his eloquent, evenhanded, and meticulously constructed debut documentary, Jason Osder stirs the ashes of this tragedy and sheds new heat and light on such timely issues as the abuse of authority and the violation of the rights of citizens, especially the marginalized and powerless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The observations coalesce into a cogent whole, providing insights that are never overtly stated.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A taut, expertly constructed, and suspenseful police procedural, it also explores the issues of loyalty, trust, betrayal, and revenge that those engaged in such morally ambiguous if essential activities would prefer not to think about.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Of all the great monster mothers in cinema history, Cornelia Keneres (Luminita Gheorghiu, who sets the standard other performances should be judged by this year) ranks high on the list.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    His film aspires to a poetry about barbarism that will not let us forget.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite the seeming inevitability of tragedy and despair, In Bloom remains true to its title. Though political and personal upheaval threatens to overwhelm them, Eka and Natia’s clarity and courage resist the ignorance, injustice, and rage all around.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A fresh perspective on one of the world’s longest conflicts.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Compared to his previous films, The Dance of Reality offers a nearly coherent narrative and a gentle, reconciliatory tone.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The opening and closing scenes of this film evoke those in “Crimson Gold.” They are long shots of the outside as seen through a security gate. In “Crimson Gold,” the view is of a chaotic street in Tehran. Here, it is the empty sea. This difference demonstrates what Panahi has been deprived of, and what the world has lost because of it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Huppert’s amazing performance not only masters the physical rigors and deformations of her character, but more importantly captures her cold capriciousness and the enigmatic innocence that one of Maud’s friend’s labels “perverse.”
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Some might find the dual conclusions too blunt in their irony, but “Norte” does not try to be consoling. Crazy as Fabian’s ideas seem, they might be the ones that prevail.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Maybe not entirely depersonalized, however. Hogg has a point of view and a point to make, cryptic though they may be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The performances ratchet up to giddy near-hysteria, as Hilde toys with Solness’s randiness and repressed memory.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Signe Baumane opens her sardonically hilarious, sneakily moving, autobiographical animated feature, Rocks in My Pocket, with what looks like a darker version of one of those chipper psycho-pharmaceutical ads.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Add to those John Curran’s adaptation of Robyn Davidson’s autobiographical book “Tracks.” In it he presents a vision of nature that shimmers with uncanny beauty and eerie solitude, transcended by Mia Wasikowska in one of the best performances of the year.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    By the movie’s end, viewers will have had a soul-searing brush with the unthinkable that far exceeds any real horror film of recent memory, and surpasses in its impact more traditional features and documentaries about the subject.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite his neuroses, VanDyke displays self-awareness and humility, and a charisma that ranges from the goofiness of Owen Wilson to the grandiosity of his hero, Lawrence of Arabia.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It is a delight for flamenco fans and provides a fascinating introduction for those unfamiliar with the music. But as cinema, despite the lush cinematography of Vittorio Storaro, it is lacking.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Like the children’s films of Iranian directors Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi, Bad Hair explores such social pathology, in part, in the guise of a kids’ movie. But it also takes on the intensity of more pointed films such as “Bicycle Thieves” (1948) and even Hector Babenco’s sensationalistic “Pixote” (1981).
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    An effusive, sad, visually gorgeous, and illuminating portrait of the artist.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    More than just a footnote to a wayward period of cultural history, The Source Family portrays an American type, the transcendent charlatan, a latter-day Gatsby, not of material riches but of the soul.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    [Terence Stamp] and Vanessa Redgrave, as well as supporting actors Christopher Eccleston and Gemma Arterton, raise Paul Andrew Williams’s entry in the golden age genre from mawkish to genuinely heartwarming.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though overloaded with narration, “Honey” triumphs visually, with stunning shots of bees in flight, tracked in slow motion, “Winged Migration”-style, by who-knows-what technical wizardry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Silva doesn’t resort to any fancy tricks to depict his characters’ inner experiences. But something happens nonetheless, a bonding of sorts that is almost, if not quite, convincing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As remorseless in style as it is in message, In the Fog offers little hope and few pleasures, but earns admiration for its elegant exploration of the lowest depths of the human condition.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In addition to being very funny, In a World . . . also makes a case for women to be, well, heard. But in terms of cohesion and narrative, it doesn’t quite come together as a movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like [The Purge and The Conjuring], Adam Wingard’s sly, diabolical, and oddly moral You’re Next draws on the home invasion/haunted house scenario, but outclasses them with its wit, irony, and technically proficient terror.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In this alternately whimsical and grim documentary, Zachary Heinzerling relates the couple’s down-and-out, inspiring saga, which slyly comments on the evolution and ironies of the past half century in contemporary art.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Who knows what they’re fighting about, but given the ecstatic ballet of fists and water, tossed bodies and smashed decor, centered by Leung’s majestic impassivity, it doesn’t really matter.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Unfortunately, Hatley chooses not to offer much context or background history regarding that or other aspects of Helm’s half-century career, other than archival footage of Helm and the Band in their prime, press clippings, and comments from the Band “biographer,” Barney Hoskyns.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Not known for subtlety, Besson gets the expected laughs, and then some. He also exercises an unwonted finesse, not only with the allusions, but also with variations on the “f” word that, if not poetic, are at least funny.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In a year when black filmmaking has surged with Oscar-touted films such as “The Butler” and the upcoming “12 Years a Slave,” Murray’s Things Never Said has a quiet eloquence of its own.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Not your everyday dilemma, but as depicted in this lushly detailed and passionately performed melodrama, the mores and traditions of this sequestered, seldom depicted group take on a broader relevance.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    It’s the kind of outrageous comedy that you might even take your folks to, though probably not your kids. Say what you will about Harmony Korine and his demented geriatrics, at least they take their trash seriously.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The result is an extended home movie that is also a sociological experiment.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The quest ends in a surprise Capra-esque resolution, which both satisfies and cloys.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    That’s the key to this movie — the way Thérèse looks at things; it’s a rare film that focuses on a woman actually looking and how she responds to what she sees.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    What Stranger by the Lake lacks in suspense and back story it makes up for in atmosphere: It’s a subtle exercise in the pathetic fallacy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    A key point, though, is that all the scientists profiled have staked their careers on this one discovery.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    “So how are you going to get them to dance together?” Dancing never explains how. Instead, as in similar films such as “Hoop Dreams,” it focuses on the contest, reducing the participants to a handful of representative kids who end up learning something about themselves and others.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like “An Inconvenient Truth” (2006), the Oscar-winning film about climate change, it is a call to action. As a screed, it builds a credible, engaging argument, presenting evidence, statistics, talking-head testimony, whimsical charts, poignant personal stories, and animated illustrations of digestive processes to make its case.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Presents enough teasing glimpses into the dancer’s personal and inner life to demand a fuller picture.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though at times it threatens to become too generic to be original, or too original to be generic, it retains enough indirection to frustrate those looking for thrills and to engage those willing to be challenged. And by the time the bottom drops out in a characteristically enigmatic ending, Night Moves distinguishes itself as a genuine Reichardt movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Filmmaker Joe Berlinger isn’t so much inspired as disgusted by the notorious gangster in his newest documentary.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Frustratingly elusive and seductively louche, Lespert’s “Yves” probes a cryptic myth and a fragile soul, penetrating neither, but conjuring up a taste of Saint Laurent’s suffering, genius and style.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Code Black shows the passion, frustration, and skill of those who work to heal despite the system, but it remains in the dark about why that system is broken and how it can be fixed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Bizarre, fascinating, and frustrating documentary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though at times Siddharth can resemble a well-photographed report on India’s social and economic ills, Mehta subtly employs different styles to sustain the poetry, poignancy, and drama.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like other offbeat and original efforts such as Spike Jonze’s “Her,” Jonathan Glazer’s “Under the Skin,” and Richard Ayaode’s dour “The Double,” it juggles genres, reverses expectations, and resorts to fantasy in order to explore the enigmas of gender, identity, and love.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    It takes a personal rather than a political perspective, exploring the ambiguities of truth and individual identity rather than the complexities of an ongoing historical calamity. And though the human drama is hypnotically gripping, it comes at the expense of the bigger picture.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The small Indonesian island of Bali still evokes images of a tropical paradise where Westerners can escape the discontents of the so-called developed world. Much of that romance lingers in Bitter Honey.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In person, as seen in Fifi Howls From Happiness, Mitra Farahani’s ambitious and self-reflexive documentary of the artist’s last days, Mohassess enthusiastically acts out those traits. It’s a performance enhanced by his diabolical, phlegm-choked laughter at his own bleakly ironic pronouncements and denunciations of the world in general.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Despite the derivativeness, Chism shows talent and shrewd instincts in the timing and direction of the comedy — she handles the requisite dinner table disaster scene with aplomb.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Intentionally or not, Roland Emmerich’s White House Down is the comedy hit of the summer. No other film equals its comic sophistication. Each nutty scenario is surpassed by the next, ludicrous story lines coalesce with expert orchestration, and absurd details return with perfect timing to build to a crescendo of hilarity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    In the end Death triumphs, but its allure and obsession remain a mystery.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though admirable in ambition, McGowan’s decision to broaden his simple story’s scope diminishes an affecting melodrama about the increasingly common, insufficiently acknowledged plagues of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Although Raymond’s career extended over five decades of London sleaze, decadence, and celebrity, neither director nor actor provide much insight into the man or his times, not to mention the significance of Raymond’s prime product.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though Mazer’s ambition is laudable, he has not yet integrated the comedy of manners into the comedy of no manners.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though director Ziad Doueiri’s uneven treatment of this provocative premise suffers from contrivance and implausibility, it nonetheless arouses profound questions about fanaticism, cultural identity, and the essential mystery of other people, even those we think we know best.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The story gets both complicated and predictable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Another problem with “Inequality” is that it offers nothing new or surprising.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Escape From Tomorrow, Moore’s sometimes surreal, sometimes sophomoric, black comic phantasmagoria, makes for a bumpy theme park ride.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    A grade A, meat-and-potatoes genre flick.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    In the war between zombies and vampires for the domination of American popular culture, the zombies currently seem to have the edge. So suggests a montage in Rob Kuhns’s amusing but perfunctory documentary about the origins of the 1968 ur-text of zombiedom, George Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead.”
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    With his thoughtful exploration of the conflict between desire and responsibility, and his self-reflexive exploration of the themes of voyeurism, ambition, and personal identity, Reeves’s debut shows signs of a talented filmmaker.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    So here’s a tip: Don’t desert this film before giving it a chance. You might not want seconds, but eventually it dishes up a satisfying slice of life.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    All in all, maybe the best 90 minutes of romantic comedy in theaters this fall. Unfortunately, the film is 122 minutes long.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Despite the music, and no matter how the film’s editors slice it, the attempt to get a rise out of the audience by way of the endangered child device verges on emotional pornography.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Writer-director Zach Clark doesn’t rise much above that level of subtlety in his lampoon of the phony goodwill and soulless commercialism of the Yuletide season. Luckily, he has a cast that elevates the puerility into genuine pathos and absurdity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    A bittersweet musing about the nature of parenthood and about the conflict between nature and nurture, it is as banal and insightful as its title.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The Visitor arrived at the height of a sci-fi and horror film revival, when “serious” directors... embraced genre conventions and made them their own. Paradise stole from them all. But unlike these directors, his ambition was coupled with delusional ineptitude.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Visitors is lovely, soothing, like the cinematic equivalent of tasteful elevator music, but it doesn’t convey as much truth as a single glimpse into Triska’s eyes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Entertaining if inconsequential gangster farce.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    West’s film differs from the “Blair Witch” template in that the footage is never actually “found.”
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Including the high expectations set up by the film’s early going, Eubank had a thoughtful thriller in the works but along the way he got his signals crossed.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Think Like a Man Too vastly surpasses the septic “The Hangover Part III.” If Story and company keep thinking like filmmakers, maybe three will be the charm.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    In other words, Citizen Koch is preaching to the choir. Which might not be a pointless exercise, seeing how the choir failed to show up for the last midterm election in 2010, and might need extra motivation not to repeat that mistake this November.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though Derrickson offers some new twists on old tricks, and evokes a mood of menace with rainy streets, gloomy interiors, and the transformation of comforting everyday objects into something horrible, the story soon devolves into variations of many movies we have seen before.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though it touches on the usual themes of youthful innocence and imagination challenged by misfortune, and on occasion achieves moments of supremely subtle, sublimely exquisite detail, “Momo” strains when it comes to evoking whimsy and magic.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    It’s like a Parisian variation on Nicole Holofcener’s “Please Give,” or the premise of another PBS Masterpiece Theater series with Smith.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Flawed as it is, “River” reminds us where all the great music came from.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though engrossing and aesthetically admirable, at times the humorless artiness verges on absurdity. It’s hard to take a film too seriously when plum jam and Bach’s “Chaconne” vie for equal cinematic significance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Powell never achieves the absurdist, uncanny poetry of that scene in Herzog’s film where a “demented” penguin marches into oblivion, but he does arouse wonder at nature’s sublimity.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Though offering some chilling twists on the usual conventions, employing wit and restraint where otherwise the filmmakers might have relied on the contents of an abattoir, Aftershock is ultimately predictable in its litany of who lives and who dies, and doesn’t try to be too ironic or self-reflexive about it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Fascinating but frustrating.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    This remake, like Frank’s horrible hobby, remains an exercise in empty repetition.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Few comedians talk so much to get a laugh, and sometimes the strain shows... And the directors don’t do him any favors by the annoyingly frequent close-ups of audience members in convulsions of laughter.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    What might have proven an illuminating perspective on familiar issues disappoints as Bouchareb fails to turn his outsider’s point of view into new insights, and instead takes the easy route, falling back on familiar stereotypes in his tour of US misogyny and xenophobia.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    A film that ultimately says more about banality than evil.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Epstein and Friedman may have the best of intentions, but in the end they’re exploiting Lovelace, too.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    If one were to compare this film to one of Jobs’s own products, it would be more like the Cube than the iPod.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The film looks great, boasting all the elegant period details that are expected in tasteful French adaptations of treasured national literature, with beautifully photographed Bordeaux landscapes and luxurious interiors. As for the human element, however, the mood is more apathetic than tragic.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Imagination is what these filmmakers could use more of, as their ingenious concept doesn’t develop much beyond a gimmick.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Despite hard-working performances and the occasional sexual frisson from ingénue Déborah François (a kind of French Renée Zellweger) and seductive Romain Duris (who looks like Tom Hanks by way of Montgomery Clift), Populaire hits mostly wrong keys.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    In lieu of suspense, Rosenthal relies on a mood of free-floating anxiety, enhanced by West Virginia (actually British Columbia) landscapes where the sun never shines. As one-note as the title suggests, A Single Shot misfires.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Despite moments of black comedy and some memorable images, this “debut’’ doesn’t offer a lot to love.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    It comes down to this: Which is more important, the innocence of a child or the survival of the species? And if the race survives, will it just become like the enemy aliens that must be destroyed to do so?
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Though fitfully entertaining, it lacks the conviction and urgency present in even the weakest of his quasi agit-prop productions.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Last Days aspires to the kind of no-frills, psychological terror of Duncan Jones’s brilliant “Moon” (2009) but, despite some determined performances, settles for the clichés of the abortive “Apollo 18” (2011).
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Gimme Shelter is sometimes moving and inspiring, but you have to wonder: Though Kathy and her movement give teenagers shelter, do they give them a life?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Fatal Assistance has few answers, and adds little clarity.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    For the most part, though, the film maintains its low ambitions; it is mostly inoffensive, only occasionally ludicrous, and at times, at least for me, genuinely moving.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Though Mira shows skill at evoking mood and building tension despite the constrained circumstances of the premise, the narrative quickly and embarrassingly breaks down.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Plays more like an exercise in nostalgia than a dramatic re-creation of a triumphant fight for civil rights.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    At its best, it delves into the murky areas of memory, childhood trauma, and family conflict. But it forgoes such troubling issues for mumbo jumbo and glowing-eyed wraiths.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Strauch’s orotund prose sounds much like that of Werner Herzog, but without the irony. Herzog’s sensibility is missed here; he could have made a masterpiece about the absurdity of these deluded seekers of Eden.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Does not sink to the bathos of Roberto Benigni’s Oscar-winning film (“Life Is Beautiful”), but it does reduce a period of irredeemable horror to the heroics of a single person.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Belle has the pace and sumptuous cinematography of a Merchant and Ivory production, but none of their memorable characters, subtle performances, or literate dialogue.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Charming, but not seductive.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Despite the climactic hugs all around and spiritual healing celebrated by a tearful service in the cathedral, some moments en route make an impression.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    So where does that leave this coming-of-age comedy written and directed by Jan Ole Gerster? Somewhere in the middle, lukewarm and inoffensive, trying hard not to be plebeian or pretentious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    What follows is no “Citizen Kane,” or even “Velvet Goldmine” (1998), Todd Haynes’s arty tale of a reporter trying to track down a missing glam rock star, in which Collette also starred, playing the missing man’s alcoholic wife.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Based on her short film, Candler’s Hellion pads its slender, commonplace, but potentially rewarding premise with contrivances, clichés, repetitiousness, and, when all else fails, implausible, arbitrary melodrama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Usually a French comedy such as this requires some crude modifications before a studio like Touchstone can remake it for American audiences. In this case, though, they just need to lose the subtitles and dub in the voices of actors like Rob Schneider or Adam Sandler. Until then, bon appetit!
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Unfortunately, this is one movie about food that I’m forgetting already.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Violette demonstrates how suffering produces great art, and that the artist isn’t the only one who suffers for it.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Sadly, the film rapidly devolves into an AARP version of a Jason Bourne-like vendetta, only bloodier and less meaningful.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Despite the artful, passionate performances by the cast, his experiment comes across more as contrivance than a work of thoughtful, aesthetic detachment.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    When it comes to writing and directing movies, though, Murdoch has some work to do. “Girl” meanders narratively and with random chronology, some scenes playing like tepid music videos, others as unhelpful efforts at exposition, some as strained drama, and some as the genuine, funny, spontaneous interactions of gifted young people.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Though it features a plucky female protagonist, Annabelle still possesses the same medieval attitude toward women as “The Conjuring,” reducing the gender to the extremes of self-sacrificing mother and malevolent toy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    David Frankel’s film reduces an extraordinary life to a predictable template of bullying, resolve, success, disappointment, and platitudes — a pattern repeated two or three times until the genuinely moving finale.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Things bottom out when Zoe not only hooks up with another lover (there is not an ounce of body fat in this movie), but also misses her son’s soccer game. And up until then we were all having a good time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Unlike other films that successfully explore abstractions, such as Wong Kar Wai’s “In the Mood for Love” or the memoiristic collages of Terence Davies, it doesn’t seem to have much going on beneath the drab surface.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Directed by splat-pack director Alexandre Aja (“Piranha 3D”) with uncharacteristic but still gruesome restraint, adapted from what seems a very busy novel by Joe Hill, Horns resembles an awkward collaboration between Nathaniel Hawthorne, Stephen King, and Rob Zombie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Those looking for further enlightenment might want to pass on the feel-good cinematic hagiography known as Awake: The Life of Yogananda.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Humorless, pretentious black-and-white tone poem about a very young Abe Lincoln.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Talya Lavie’s Zero Motivation has more substance than a sitcom, even though it’s broken down into three TV series-like episodes. But it’s no “M*A*S*H” — a film to which some have compared it — either.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    As for the performances, only homely Giovana has heart and depth. The two boys lack chemistry, even in chemistry class, due in part to the trite dialogue, or at least as it is translated in subtitles.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    The problem with high concepts like this is cooking up a story and characters to go along with it.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Grown Ups 2 offers a bittersweet paean to childhood and youth and their inevitable loss. Take the case of Adam Sandler. Didn’t he use to be funny?
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    “You don’t need a man to define you!” Very true, and so much for feminism. The rest of the film takes a long, convoluted, predictable, and mostly unfunny route to prove that the opposite is the case.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    This movie doesn’t make the case. In fact, had they upped the absurdity a notch, it would rival the comedy of Christopher Guest’s let’s-put-on-a-show mockumentary, “Waiting for Guffman” (1996). As it stands, it plays like an infomercial.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    It’s a Christmas nightmare, stuck with two obnoxious relatives who think they’re funny, and won’t shut up.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    What I found more disturbing was the casual misogyny of the convoluted story line.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Though Zefferelli’s version was trashy and downright nuts, at least it made you feel the love. This pallid replay just seems endless.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    One hopes that, for their own good, when any of these actors are offered a script like this again, they’ll have the sense to just say no.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    It’s a big deal for the NFL and ESPN, no doubt, and Draft Day serves as 110 minutes of product placement for both.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Joe
    Joe is one more in the line of Southern Gothic miserabilism that includes “Winter’s Bone” and “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” films that many have praised but some find condescending.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Puzzle is neither puzzling nor much fun. It reminds you how much better Julie Delpy told the same story in “2 Days in New York.”
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Unfortunately, though, Rossato-Bennett and Cohen seem to think that the technique is a panacea. In fact, it is not even original, as music therapy in nursing homes has been around for some time.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    For the most part, Fluffy’s material is just that — fluff, with a touch now and then of bile and bad taste.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    A mawkish, preposterous melodrama riddled with clichés, stereotypes, bad dialogue, and inept emotional manipulation.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Thunder falls into the common mistake of many children’s films — it underestimates its audience.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Though not everyone agrees, Ben Stiller’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” came close to finding the secret for making a movie about the secret of happiness. Peter Chelsom’s Hector and the Search for Happiness tries hard, but fails. Miserably.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Isn’t fate a funny thing? Especially when Nicholas Sparks makes it up. Filmmakers love to adapt his stuff because he puts together narratives riddled with contrived coincidences and implausibilities meant to seem like the workings of providence when in fact they are the creations of a hackneyed mind.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    The fundamental value put forth in Brown’s “Sunday” sequel is not fearlessness but “family.”
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Somewhere between John Cassavetes’s “Husbands” (1970) and “The Hangover” (2009) you will find Last Vegas. Not necessarily a bad place to be, except the film unfortunately has the madcap hilarity of the former and the emotional intensity of the latter.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    As for the dialogue, although the characters talk really fast, swear a lot, and overlap their lines, what they’re saying isn’t very funny or authentic. It’s as if David Mamet collaborated on writing an episode of “Two and a Half Men.”
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Despite such attractions as Gabriel Byrne as a vampire with a skin disease and a décor that combines Hogwarts with “Suspiria,” the only lesson learned here is that Hollywood needs fresh blood.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Misogynistic, homophobic, scatological — none of these words come up in any of the spelling bees that take place in Jason Bateman’s directorial debut, but they apply to the film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    The Quiet Ones simply has nothing to say.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    One thing you have to give Bay credit for: He has a knack for bringing A-list talent down to his level. Like Mark Wahlberg, Oscar nominee for “The Fighter” and “The Departed.”
    • 41 Metascore
    • 12 Peter Keough
    As a five-minute sketch it would have been so-so. But as a 93-minute slog through witless puerility, it seems like an eternity in hell, baby.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 12 Peter Keough
    Stunningly insipid and pretentious.

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