For 271 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Winter Sleep
Lowest review score: 12 The Man on Her Mind
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 43 out of 271
271 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    For the most part, Fluffy’s material is just that — fluff, with a touch now and then of bile and bad taste.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    A mawkish, preposterous melodrama riddled with clichés, stereotypes, bad dialogue, and inept emotional manipulation.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Thunder falls into the common mistake of many children’s films — it underestimates its audience.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Though not everyone agrees, Ben Stiller’s “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” came close to finding the secret for making a movie about the secret of happiness. Peter Chelsom’s Hector and the Search for Happiness tries hard, but fails. Miserably.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Isn’t fate a funny thing? Especially when Nicholas Sparks makes it up. Filmmakers love to adapt his stuff because he puts together narratives riddled with contrived coincidences and implausibilities meant to seem like the workings of providence when in fact they are the creations of a hackneyed mind.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    The fundamental value put forth in Brown’s “Sunday” sequel is not fearlessness but “family.”
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    It’s just like the Kenny Rogers song says: “You’ve got to know when to hold ’em, know when to fold ’em.” It’s time for this Gambler to walk away.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Aside from the clever punning of the title, Spare Parts ends up as jury-rigged and programmatic as Stinky, the robot in the movie. And, unlike Stinky, it is dead in the water.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Here Aniston suffers every manipulative cliché and contrivance in the tearjerker playbook. She works hard, and it’s painful to watch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    If nothing else, Beloved Sisters is one of the most visually striking biopics around. Too bad you have to wade through so much verbiage in order to enjoy it.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    If you close your eyes you’d think it was a commercial for a “Great Love Songs” DVD collection.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Almost all mainstream movies steal from other movies, but the better ones get away with it because they possess some distinctive identity. The best that Ken Scott’s Unfinished Business can come up with is Vince Vaughn — as the straight man.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    The young cast comes through with appealing, naturalistic performances. But Weber’s programmatic, preachy story and emotional manipulation is so blatant that it verges on the fatuous.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    It tries to bridge the gap between pop culture and cultural elitism, between high art and the common commodity that everyone else buys tickets to see. A worthy goal, but it results in a movie that has none of the virtues of either.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    The film is so bizarre, contrived, manipulative, and meretricious that anything is possible.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    More disappointing than the film’s inertia and amorphousness is its sacrifice of the real-world themes of class, money, corruption, and power. Unable to decide what story he wanted to tell, Téchiné hedges his bets and loses everything.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    There’s no end in sight, and that’s what’s really insidious.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Shot in a rich palette, the film does provide diversion with some of its funkily detailed sets and supporting actors.... Otherwise, the film distinguishes itself for its miscasting and misuse of its cast.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Somewhere between John Cassavetes’s “Husbands” (1970) and “The Hangover” (2009) you will find Last Vegas. Not necessarily a bad place to be, except the film unfortunately has the madcap hilarity of the former and the emotional intensity of the latter.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    As for the dialogue, although the characters talk really fast, swear a lot, and overlap their lines, what they’re saying isn’t very funny or authentic. It’s as if David Mamet collaborated on writing an episode of “Two and a Half Men.”
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Despite such attractions as Gabriel Byrne as a vampire with a skin disease and a décor that combines Hogwarts with “Suspiria,” the only lesson learned here is that Hollywood needs fresh blood.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Misogynistic, homophobic, scatological — none of these words come up in any of the spelling bees that take place in Jason Bateman’s directorial debut, but they apply to the film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    The Quiet Ones simply has nothing to say.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    One thing you have to give Bay credit for: He has a knack for bringing A-list talent down to his level. Like Mark Wahlberg, Oscar nominee for “The Fighter” and “The Departed.”
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    The film is stuck in the inconsequential rut of the series. The characters are static, and the comedy is situational rather than dramatic.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Roland Emmerich’s Stonewall reduces these events to a backdrop for caricatures that were already passé in William Friedkin’s “The Boys in the Band” (1970).
    • 22 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Denounce the cynics who pander such pabulum as entertainment for children.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    In his second directorial effort, Mojave, Monahan has no such map to follow, and he wanders in a land of sophomoric pretentiousness and banal profundities.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 12 Peter Keough
    As a five-minute sketch it would have been so-so. But as a 93-minute slog through witless puerility, it seems like an eternity in hell, baby.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 12 Peter Keough
    Stunningly insipid and pretentious.

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