For 314 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Manuscripts Don't Burn
Lowest review score: 12 Dangerous Men
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 48 out of 314
314 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Bonello takes on the point of view of Saint Laurent himself, exposing a visionary world seen from within that is as strange and wonderful as that of a magnificently stitched garment turned inside out.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Such miserable people; why should we care? Maybe because Ceylan does. By staging this petulant misery in a snow-filled world of melancholy, unearthly beauty, he underscores their tragedy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The government, even under the new, more moderate leadership of President Hassan Rouhani, has reason for concern. Unlike Rasoulof and Panahi’s previous, more metaphorical films, this one confronts its subject head-on with unflinching candor.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    May also be among the best war movies of all time.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Through patience, skill, discretion, and trust, Jesse Moss has taken a seemingly small town story and turned it into both a microcosm of today’s most urgent issues and a portrait of a single suffering soul.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    After a period of creative drought, Zhang’s homecoming is a cause for celebration.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    It takes a few minutes to catch on, and it would be indiscrete to specify what it is, but once you figure out what’s really strange about it you have entered the solipsistic prison of a tormented mind.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    The rest of the film consists mostly of Akerman talking with her mother, blithely and lovingly, about everyday ephemera and about the past (Natalia was a survivor of Auschwitz), both via Skype and at her mother’s genteel home in Brussels.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Another complex and magnificently acted melodrama.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though the outcome is a matter of public record, it still unfolds like a suspenseful tragedy. Suffice it to say that the wheels of justice turn slowly, but they grind exceedingly fine.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Efficient, cogently argued, and visually compelling documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Why do Parker and the other clinic owners and staff persevere despite constant harassment and potential assassination? Not for the money, certainly. Perhaps because no one else will.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though some of the concepts may be New Age boilerplate, the film’s images linger; especially that of the river, the snake devouring us all.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Kusama’s handling of point of view is diabolically shrewd. She maximizes the terror potential of the vapidly ostentatious modernist mansion without fetishizing it. She intensifies the monstrosity of some of the characters by making them all too human. And as for guessing the ending — good luck.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Just when you were about to give up on the Internet as a swamp full of trolls, bullies, and liars, along comes a documentary like Ido Haar’s Presenting Princess Shaw.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It is part Rorschach test and part theme park ride as the filmmakers shoot from the strangest places and from such odd perspectives that much of the film consists of trying to figure out what the heck is going on.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite the fabulism of Tale of Tales, it remains rooted in contemporary issues. Prince Charming does not figure much in this film, but women do.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Like the children’s films of Iranian directors Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi, Bad Hair explores such social pathology, in part, in the guise of a kids’ movie. But it also takes on the intensity of more pointed films such as “Bicycle Thieves” (1948) and even Hector Babenco’s sensationalistic “Pixote” (1981).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Huppert’s amazing performance not only masters the physical rigors and deformations of her character, but more importantly captures her cold capriciousness and the enigmatic innocence that one of Maud’s friend’s labels “perverse.”
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    As often happens in Guzmán’s films, The Pearl Button keeps returning to the Augusto Pinochet dictatorship of 1973-90, during which thousands of Chileans were “disappeared,” taken away and never seen again alive.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    His film aspires to a poetry about barbarism that will not let us forget.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Like a great silent movie, it creates its pathos and comedy out of the concrete objects being animated, building elaborate gags involving everyday items transformed into Rube Goldberg devices that sometimes entrap the characters, or, when properly manipulated by them, provide a means of achieving their goals.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Some might find the dual conclusions too blunt in their irony, but “Norte” does not try to be consoling. Crazy as Fabian’s ideas seem, they might be the ones that prevail.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    More conventional in approach than Linklater’s 12-year filmmaking odyssey, “Identity” demonstrates its boldness not with stylistic originality but with political acuity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It takes a woman to make a great film about the all-male bastion of the French Foreign Legion. Claire Denis did so in her elliptical desert updating of Herman Melville’s “Billy Budd” in “Beau Travail” (1999), and her fellow French director Sarah Leonor nearly equals that feat in The Great Man.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Is it an allegory for contemporary Greece? Beats me. Like the films of Buñuel, it’s about the human condition, regarded with bemusement and acuity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Maybe not entirely depersonalized, however. Hogg has a point of view and a point to make, cryptic though they may be.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Despite the self-conscious derivativeness and allusions, Tsai’s debut already demonstrates the contrariness and motifs that have distinguished him as a unique, difficult, and transcendent filmmaker.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Like another documentary set in North Dakota, Jesse Moss’s “The Overnighters,” they follow the story for months as it unfolds, offering no editorial guidance except dates and places and a soundtrack by T. Griffith that underscores the growing angst and pending horror. Welcome to Leith. Say goodbye to certitude.

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