For 117 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 19% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rachel Saltz's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 90 I Killed My Mother
Lowest review score: 20 I Do
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 30 out of 117
  2. Negative: 13 out of 117
117 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    These are vivid, flawed, even introspective characters. And they're classic American strivers. With rodeo, but not just that, they hope to go beyond where they have been.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    These interviews form the backbone of !W.A.R., and like the film, they're passionate, contentious, funny, sincere, politically attuned.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    Ms. Hui, a rare successful female director in the Hong Kong film industry, drew her story from real events, and the movie retains a tonic flavor of the everyday: its drama unfolds simply, without explosive moments but not without emotion. She and her two excellent leads keep the film buoyant.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    Patang ("The Kite"), Prashant Bhargava's first feature, has a lovely, unforced quality. That's because Mr. Bhargava lets his story, set during the annual kite festival in Ahmedabad, India, tell itself, unfolding slowly as he follows filmmaking's most basic and most sinned-against dictum: Show, don't tell.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Rachel Saltz
    As a director, Mr. Dolan has a freewheeling style, and he’s self-dramatizing enough to want to call attention to it without being too much of a visual show-off.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Rachel Saltz
    This history is too recent to seem dry, and the film gets an added emotional punch from interviews with former tenants, whose memories mix fondness with anger and loss.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Rachel Saltz
    By keeping its focus admirably tight, the sober and sobering Israeli documentary The Law in These Parts presents a devastating case against the occupation of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    The writer-director Anusha Rizvi, making her feature debut, shoots her story efficiently and with visual panache, but after a compelling setup her script runs out of juice.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    There's a lovely, unhurried quality to Mr. Hosoda's storytelling, which nicely matches the clean, classically composed images of his outer story.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Mr. Wexler has found interesting people and useful, funny and sometimes crackpot-seeming information.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    It also shows, perceptively and often sweetly, a broader slice of young, urban, educated life in India as the three deal with careers, love and happiness.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    If the movie feels old-school (with new-school production values), consider its pedigree. It's no wonder: Shaolin is a reimagining of the 1982 "Shaolin Temple," in which Jet Li made his debut.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Edmon Roch has a great story to tell in Garbo the Spy, and he recounts it with the flair of a Hollywood spy movie: "Garbo" is dramatic, entertaining, even funny in parts.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Big Miracle gets off to a shaky start, but once revved up, it becomes an involving work-against-the-clock-and-the-odds action movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Well made, and for once the talking-heads format is satisfying.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Gerhard Richter may not fling paint at the canvas, Jackson Pollock-style, but as Corinna Belz shows in her documentary Gerhard Richter Painting, he can be his own kind of action painter.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    By turns frustrating and moving, Ali Samadi Ahadi's documentary The Green Wave, about the Green Revolution in Iran, gets a jolt from footage shot by the people for the people on the people's cellphones.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    The filmmakers retain a touching faith that most Americans won't tolerate injustice when they know about it. This film is meant to teach them.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    It's very much a Hindi film, but updated and delivered with conviction and style.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    The interviews are mostly good and instructive, but the well-chosen historical footage is better.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    These mostly silent home movies often have the tug of nostalgia, especially those that show domestic life... But images can be slippery, showing something different from what their creators intended. Even as Mr. Lilti constructs a history...he seems to show its fissures.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    Pitched somewhere between allegory and documentary, the film looks at its characters in a dispassionate, almost deadpan way. They’re something more than specimens under glass but something less than fully rounded people.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Rachel Saltz
    If A Coffee in Berlin has its own kind of formula and a romanticism that reads as both youthful and obscuring, it nevertheless absorbs you and makes you wonder what Mr. Gerster will do next.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    Korkoro (the word means freedom in Romani) has an unexpectedly leisurely quality as it shows the texture of Gypsy life - the music-making, the intense bonds with horses and the natural world - and its awkward fit with modernity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    At times you wish Mr. Marx had sharper storytelling skills (or a better editor). Some important details seem clear only in retrospect, and some remain murky. Still, Mr. Marx shines a light on a place and a way of life that are rapidly changing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    Has a complicated story to tell, about black surfers and, more broadly, about African-American history and the history of surfing. Great topics all, but that's a lot of ground to cover and, unsurprisingly, the film often feels a bit scattershot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    If the storytelling disappoints (shocking!), the film mostly doesn't. It relies on action and effects and Bollywood's trump card, star power, to carry the day. This is Mr. Khan's movie, and once he sheds Shekhar's droopy locks, he shines as the deadpan, action-hero robot with digital snot and smooth moves on the dance floor.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    The talented Mr. Ross makes Dre's panic and adrenaline-fueled behavior all too believable. You watch as he sees his horizons dim. What could be sadder?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    As storytelling, "The Global Catch" often falls short. It has too much to cover to be comprehensive and can seem a bit random. As a consciousness raiser, the film fares much better.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Rachel Saltz
    Mr. Mortensen keeps you watching, even when the movie’s storytelling underwhelms. But Everybody Has a Plan is less about story than about texture and atmosphere. They stay with you, as does the haunted visage of Agustín, drifting on the delta waters.