For 89 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Rob Nelson's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Mysteries of Lisbon
Lowest review score: 10 Killers
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 39 out of 89
  2. Negative: 12 out of 89
89 movie reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Rob Nelson
    Charles Ferguson's sophomore film Inside Job is the definitive screen investigation of the global economic crisis, providing hard evidence of flagrant amorality -- and of a new nonfiction master at work.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Rob Nelson
    A handsomely mounted adaptation of the like-titled Portuguese novel, Ruiz's 4 1/2-hour epic establishes the essential ambiguity of its chameleonic characters from the get-go and proceeds thereby, with riveting results and revelations that continue right to the end.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Rob Nelson
    Handsomely produced and never less than hugely entertaining, Ascher's film is catnip for Kubrickians and critics both professional and otherwise.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Rob Nelson
    Focusing on the absurdly ultraviolent tit-for-tat tussles among a trio of Tokyo crime families, the film is a beautifully staged marvel that confidently reasserts Kitano's considerable cinematic gifts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Rob Nelson
    Skillfully adapted from Tim Tharp's novel, evocatively lensed in the working-class neighborhoods of Athens, Ga., and tenderly acted by Miles Teller and Shailene Woodley, this bittersweet ode to the moment of childhood's end builds quietly to a pitch-perfect finale.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    Debuting writer-director Anusha Rizvi manages to wrest a lively feature out of a gravely serious issue, capturing the desperation of India's village farmers, as well as the nation's shift from agriculture to industrialization, without losing sight of the entertainment principle.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    In purely cinematic terms, Buried, set in late 2006, is an ingenious exercise in sustained tension that would make Alfred Hitchcock turn over in his grave.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    Repugnant content, grislier than the ugliest torture porn, ought to have made the film unwatchable, but it doesn't, simply because Kim's picture is so beautifully filmed, carefully structured and viscerally engaging.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    There's no mistaking Jardin's playful mastery of the Hollywood-style action aesthetic; his movie starts in high gear and accelerates steadily from there.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    Much like the band's self-conscious synth-pop itself, "Shut Up" is initially satiric but ultimately disarming in its emotional resonance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    First-time writer-director Aurora Guerrero beautifully captures the fluctuating dynamics of friendship between 15-year-old girls in Mosquita y Mari.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    A highly satisfying Western-cum-noir in the old tradition, Deadfall is alive in ways that are all too rare among American movies.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    Give or take the titular disclosure, John Dies at the End is a thoroughly unpredictable horror-comedy -- and an immensely entertaining one, too.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    By turns pulse-quickening and contemplative, The Crash Reel is a thoroughly winning docu portrait of former pro snowboarder Kevin Pearce.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    Director Jesse James Miller’s bio of ‘80s-era World Boxing Council lightweight champ Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini connects on emotional levels in the telling of an up-from-nothing brawler whose colorful career climaxed in tragedy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    The ups and downs of a decades-long friendship are charted with warmth and sensitivity in Shepard and Dark.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    [An] initially playful, ultimately haunting documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Rob Nelson
    An aptly intense and innovative study of pioneering rock poet Nick Cave, 20,000 Days on Earth playfully disguises itself as fiction while more than fulfilling the requirements of a biographical documentary.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Slight but winning and often funny, the scrappy Amerindie Wah Do Dem is a fish-out-of-water comedy driven by Sean "Bones" Sullivan's offbeat performance.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Those wearing black finger-polish are bound to appreciate it, but first-time feature director Alexandre Franchi deserves mainstream cred for his own cheeky role-play.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Sparked by wonderfully lived-in performances from Julianne Moore and Mark Ruffalo, The Kids Are All Right is alright, if not up to the level of writer-director Lisa Cholodenko's earlier pair of new bohemian dramas, "High Art" and "Laurel Canyon."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Splashy colors, oddball framing, super-cool threads and cranked-up retro music supply the picture's bizarre love triangle with a dance-club atmosphere that'll seduce young audiences of most any orientation.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Despite amply funded f/x, including some spectacular muscle-car stunts, the movie motors to the grindhouse with squealing tires and guitars, gratuitous nudity and gore, and a scantily clad greasy-spoon waitress endearingly played by Amber Heard.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    More compelling as an intellectual exercise than an emotional one, Certified Copy finds deep-thinking writer-director Abbas Kiarostami asserting there's nothing new under the Tuscan sun, particularly not his own conventional romantic drama set in rural Italy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    A possession thriller less terrifying than fun.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Distinguished by splashy cinematography, engaging performances from Dennis Quaid and Helen Hunt as the girl's go-get-'em parents.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    An aptly gorgeous-looking Manhattan meller whose quartet of sexy actors proves no less attractive than the well-mounted picture as a whole.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Under African Skies is appreciably smarter than most celebrity musician documentaries.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    The picture scores big points by drawing a sharp distinction between corporate vidgame programmers and indies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    An aptly infuriating expose of sexual abuse within the U.S. military, Kirby Dick's documentary The Invisible War calls high-ranking officials to account for turning a blind eye to a violent epidemic.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Audaciously giving itself license to do whatever it wants, Leos Carax's narratively unhinged, beautifully shot and frequently hilarious Holy Motors coheres -- arguably, anyway -- into a vivid jaunt through the auteur's cinematic obsessions.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    A bona fide high-wire act, Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away delivers towering thrills through its candy-colored 3D ode to the titular outfit's astounding acrobatics.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    The clearest achievement of Dolan’s typically self-indulgent eye-popper comes in equating its gender-bending protagonist’s metamorphoses with those in any relationship that lasts for years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    It takes pains to make the political personal, forging the viewer’s identification with Scahill by making persistent use of his voiceover narration and keeping him oncamera throughout.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    The brisk, brief feature appears more atmospheric than terrifying, but its bare-bones tale gets under the skin.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Escape From Tomorrow is a sneakily subversive exercise in low-budget surrealism and anti-corporate satire.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Camp X-Ray is most commendable for believably depicting the U.S. military from a female’s point of view.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Rob Nelson
    Rossato-Bennett’s over-the-top narration often sounds cloying and banal... But the filmmaker succeeds in providing context, medical and historical, in between awakenings.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    The movie is witty only on occasion. But it lingers in the mind, thanks largely to its trio of actors -- especially Alex Karpovsky.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    Paramount's Footloose reboot never quite cuts loose enough to distinguish itself from the original.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    Payback is a rarefied conceptual documentary that will appeal to a limited but highly appreciative audience.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    This low-budget shocker eventually pays off, displaying just enough narrative ingenuity to compensate for a cinematically crude and logistically sketchy deployment of the requisite blood-and-guts mayhem.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    First-time writer-director Stephen Chbosky adapts his young-adult bestseller with far more passion than skill, which suits familiar scenes of adolescent awkwardness aptly enough.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    This merciless work of anti-entertainment is arguably admirable for being as disturbingly disgusting as it wants to be.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    This disarmingly cheeky, intermittently gorgeous trifle would create the perfect bookend to a career begun almost 50 years ago.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Rob Nelson
    Overly melodramatic but fairly engrossing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    This fawning docu goes to lengths to portray the octogenarian Playboy magazine founder as among the greatest figures of 20th-century American popular culture, while only cursorily acknowledging his status as a pioneering softcore pornographer.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Waiting for Super to deliver the funny is an experience as long as the film itself.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    A weaker "Elephant," Quebecois director Denis Villeneuve's school-shooting drama Polytechnique nevertheless distinguishes itself by endeavoring to comprehend the 25-year-old man who murdered more than a dozen female students at Montreal's Polytechnique School in 1989.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    A movie that tries and fails to channel the indelibly dreamy mood of Sofia Coppola's "The Virgin Suicides." Well-intentioned but derivative and only intermittently engaging, the suburban Michigan-set indie hits at least as many false notes as true ones.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Far less chilling than versions from 1951 and 1982, Universal's latest take on The Thing at least has a strong lead thesp in Mary Elizabeth Winstead, recruited for the studio's bid to turn a tale of ice-cold macho paranoia into a beauty-vs.-beast shocker a la "Alien."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    We Bought a Zoo is an odd bird, warm-blooded but largely lifeless.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Alternately gutsy and preachy, specific and scattered, the righteously angry pic risks alienating those who could be galvanized by its proof of Big Oil's corrupting omnipotence.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Variably articulate subjects drone on and on in an 83-minute film that could easily make its TV news-style point in a half-hour or less.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    A literary film that stands to work best for those who don't read, The Words is a slick, superficially clever compendium of stories about authors of uncertain talent and varying success.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Solidly acted but aloof and slow as molasses.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    A costumer that's well named for being pleasant and conventional but little more.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    Oddly overstuffed with cameos by bigscreen actors playing tongue-in-cheek versions of themselves, Webber's Los Angeles-set, microbudget dramedy delivers some rare and beautiful moments of daddy day-care, but its tone shifts more wildly than a preschooler's disposition and its narrative is stillborn.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    This documentary plays like an extended episode of “Unsolved Mysteries,” deficient as it is in stylistic zeal, investigative spirit and plain old scares.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    The helmer’s narrative dead end here registers not as a lack of nerve so much as a lack of imagination.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Rob Nelson
    The narratively jumbled film...features too many scenes that amount to mere stargazing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    Not clever enough to be truly pretentious.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    Formulaic and forgettable.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    Finding a pulse only in the band's late-reel performance of "Alive," a lusty passage that would've begun a pic intent on making a case for the group's greatness, "Twenty" simply counts the years from 1991 via sludgy backstage and onstage footage whose rarity can't forgive its inclusion. Crowe's critic mentor, the late Lester Bangs, would cringe.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    Shovels enough dirt on the Tea Party guru and self-described hockey mom to satisfy her haters, but lacks sufficient humor and insight to make it a must-see for anyone outside the Brit muckraker's fan base.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    Mistaking over-the-top dysfunctional family cruelty for comedy and drama, Another Happy Day tries and fails to channel "Rachel Getting Married" in its protracted tale of a wedding-party weekend that turns predictably from scabrous to redemptive.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    Pulling off the thespian equivalent of running a marathon, the hyperventilating Olsen works awfully hard in the service of a film that, in the end, does little or nothing to preserve her character's integrity.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    A typically smart performance by Juliette Binoche isn't enough to keep Elles from drowning in pseudo-intellectual pretension and general banality.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    This monotonously deadpan coming-of-age comedy has little to recommend it beyond some beautiful widescreen cinematography and the momentary kick of seeing David Duchovny looking like a stoned Jesus as Goat Man.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    Bursting with cheap f/x, the pic is often tedious when not repugnant, but it’s hard to dislike.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    Director Scott Hamilton Kennedy (“The Garden”) favors formulaic uplift over investigation, failing to offer a p.o.v. on whether young creative people should be driven as mercilessly as these. Lackluster videography further dulls the pic, which culminates in frustratingly fleeting glimpses of the students’ year-end performances.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Rob Nelson
    Acquitting herself capably in a lead role that strips her bare in more ways than one, Robin Weigert (HBO’s “Deadwood”) proves worthy of a future in features, whereas first-time writer-director Stacie Passon mainly exposes her background in commercials.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    Though stretched to a two-hour run time, Doctorow's socially critical tale is reduced to queasy spectacle.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    Even at 73 minutes, the film is, well, too damn long.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    Unlike his "Snakes on a Plane," director David R. Ellis' sharks-in-a-lake thriller displays little sense of its scenario's camp potential. Gore, too, is in short supply on account of the pic's PG-13 rating, which renders the attack scenes nearly toothless.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    In the curious absence of religious satire, toilet humor isn't enough to constitute comedy, while the leads' grating performances make 81 minutes feel eternal.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    In this case, Montiel's awkward appropriation of gritty crime-drama conventions results in a film that's contrived and implausible, at times absurdly so.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    Gets one's attention but doesn't keep it, due to ill-cued flashbacks, groan-inducing dialogue and wooden performances.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    Straining to be a distaff “Deliverance,” indie thriller Black Rock is unable to shock, much less convince.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    Reducing an immensely disturbing, politically byzantine tale to a series of cartoonish vignettes, this celeb-studded biopic squanders a gutsy performance by Amanda Seyfried.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    Milkshake sucks all the flavor out of a tasty premise.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 30 Rob Nelson
    Director Argento half-heartedly mixes schlocky 3D f/x with one-dimensional characters for a near-two-hour joke that ought to have been funnier.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 20 Rob Nelson
    That Saw 3D is relentlessly repugnant will delight the franchise's fans and surprise almost no one. The best that can be said for the picture, gamely directed by longtime "Saw" cutter Kevin Greutert, is that it offers little in between the traps, which are more creatively vicious than they've ever been.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 10 Rob Nelson
    Bullets fly and jokes land with a thud in Killers, a deadly dull hubby's-a-hit man farce that alternately resembles a knockoff of 2005's "Mr. and Mrs. Smith" and a rehash of "Knight & Day" avant la lettre .