For 748 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Robert Lloyd's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Returned: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 30 out of 748
748 tv reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    Certainly, if the question is, can you make a dark, slightly depressing series starring the Muppets, the answer, obviously, is yes. Is this an inappropriate use of the characters? I don't know. Is it strange? Certainly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It works best at its most intimate, as family drama, and as another variant on "The Real World," in which people who would not ordinarily live together are made to do so.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It's an uneven show that lacks the finely crafted eccentricity of a "Northern Exposure" and "Twin Peaks" or "Picket Fences" (other strange-small-town shows featuring police officers), but when I say "uneven," I do mean that sometimes it's good.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It is a sometimes clever, just as often clichéd mix of dystopian tropes, with performances ranging from nicely modulated to almost over the top, and some sly design that, along with some twisted PSAs, also accounts for most of the story’s humor. It is quite watchable and nothing special.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Some of these women are troubled, certainly, but none of them seems like trouble. Indeed, I felt a little sad at times, watching--not as I usually do, for the society that could produce such a program, but for the actual women in it, as far as I could make them out.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    At times it feels enough that the players seem to be enjoying themselves to enjoy it alongside them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    he two episodes offered for review, "Food Revolutionaries" (including Auguste Escoffier, Julia Child and Clarence Birdseye) and "Carnivores," hop around within their subjects with no particular direction, but lots of anecdote and opinion; the tone is hopelessly antic, marked with animations and sound effects and never landing on any image for longer than it takes to take it in.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Whether or not they add up to much, the scenes play well, and there are enough heavy-breathing soap-operatics, random acts of violence and unanswered questions to keep one idly watching.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Chicagoland is a mosaic, as befits its many-cultured metropolitan setting--and for better or worse. The series moves fast to get it all in, muscling you with its Big Shoulders and too-present hip-hoppy soundtrack, giving you just enough of its characters--including kids and cops, a doctor, a rapper, a restaurateur--to make you feel you should be getting more of them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    This is news that never quite rises to the level of an event: "David Mamet Came to Television and All We Got Was a Better 'E-Ring.' "
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    The only experiment actually being done here is the ongoing one of determining just how long people will watch this sort of thing. That is an experiment with no end in sight.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    I can't say the pilot struck me as especially funny, but there are good things and talented people in it, and it looks good.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    An expectation of failure is built into the comedy, so that at times the contestants are funny only in the attempt to be funny. At other times, given the circumstances, it may seem miraculous that they can be funny at all.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    While there's nothing particularly wrong with Do Not Disturb, neither is there anything so inspired as to make you leap to your feet, crying, "Yes! This is what television needs! More workplace comedies! More hotels!"
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Much about the pilot felt flat or programmatic to me, but much was likable as well, especially the nonchalant tenderness between the male leads. And the cast is good.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    It's probably enough to say that if you like this sort of thing, this is just the sort of thing you'll like. (If the tautology fits, wear it.) Rodriguez knows how this machine works as well as anyone alive. Whether such sensationalist kicks are good for us "as a people," or indeed as people in particular, is a question the culture and its guardians and gadflies have been batting around for years. A decision is not due any time soon.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    The celebration and surrender are enough to put the viewer in a vicarious good mood, no matter how unconvincing its context.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    At times the production can seem underbudgeted, the direction overwrought. Here and there, the dialogue sounds as if it had been written by an alien who picked up English from broadcasts of B-pictures. As the series' resident alien, Charles Dance--both as a disembodied and later an elaborately embodied, commanding voice--gets the best of this business.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    The central business of selling “Mr. First Lady” is not all that compelling, and the integration of the real and fictional worlds is so familiar that it offers no charge on its own. Early on, one wants it to be more daring, or darker, or simply funnier; later episodes, as personal business between the leads come into play, and wholly fictional characters arrive, do perk up.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    It lurches in tone and an accelerated narrative that seems at times to leave holes in the storytelling, gaps that draw you up short where you should be just be sailing along. Still, if it's a bit of a mess, it's not an uninteresting one.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Robert Lloyd
    The episode galumphs loudly across a checkerboard of scenes -- Stark at work, Stark at home, Stark at work at home -- that achieve neither the convincing quality of detailed realism nor the dumb fun of untethered melodrama.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Lacking the subtext, satire and snappy talk that made "Buffy" golden, Demons (on the evidence of its first two episodes) has little on its mind past raising spooks and smiting them, but it does a fair enough job of that.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    We get a glimpse of some intriguing characters that we don't, however, quite come to know--not in the episodes I've seen, anyway--because we are being pelted the whole time with exposition and explanation. We're rarely allowed just to look or listen in or to think for ourselves.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Like other Rhimes shows, including "Scandal" and "Grey's Anatomy," it filters a lot of nuttiness through good actors who can make compelling what otherwise might seem absurd.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    As drama, it's uneven, often cliched, even silly, but, like the store in which it's set--and whose ground floor, mezzanine and facade have been splendidly re-created--so variously stocked that you will likely find something here to take home.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Robert Lloyd
    If "The Class" feels calculated, unrelated to life outside sitcoms, and encased in amber, it's a competent American product, ultimately, no harder to watch than, say, a Dodge is to drive.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Painless at worst, and mostly better than that.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Robert Lloyd
    Wootton is a quick-minded, thematically consistent improviser who thoroughly knows his characters, and obviously something of a daredevil: You can get hurt doing this stuff, or arrested. But as in Baron Cohen's comedies, the cleverness of the star is too much the point.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Robert Lloyd
    Housewives D.C. offers neither a portrait of Washington insider society, to which its stars have no access, or even an unvarnished look at any person's real life. People are more complicated than this, and (for much of the day) more normal--what in this context would be called "boring."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Robert Lloyd
    The producers are so focused on creating and highlighting conflict that after a while, as with the boy who cried wolf, you would just like everyone to shut up and be eaten.

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