For 4,340 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Howards End
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
4340 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Blanchett, Crudup and Gambon stand above and somehow apart from the absurdities of the screenplay.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It looks good, it moves quickly and it is often a jolly good time. As mindless swashbuckling in a well-designed production, it can't be faulted. The less you know about the British Empire and human nature, the more you will like it, but then that can be said of so many movies.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Slight and sometimes wearisome.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Heaven help the unsuspecting families who wander into Adam Sandler's Eight Crazy Nights expecting a jolly animated holiday funfest.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    There are a lot of logical gaps in this movie.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie is simply not clear about where it wants to go and what it wants to do. It is heavy on episode and light on insight, and although it takes courage to bring up touchy topics it would have taken more to treat them frankly.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    In this film there is a scene where something is said in English pronounced with one accent, and a character asks, ''What did he say?'' and he is told -- in English pronounced with another accent.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    After the bite and freshness of "Analyze This," Mickey Blue Eyes plays like an afterthought.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Lacking a smarter screenplay, it milks the genuine skills of its actors and director for more than it deserves, and then runs off the rails in an ending more laughable than scary.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    My problem with Borstal Boy isn't so much with the facts as with the tone.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The disappointment is that Burton has not yet found the storytelling and character-building strength to go along with his pictorial flair.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The climactic events are shameless, contrived, and wildly out of tune with the rest of the story. To saddle Costner, Penn and Newman with such goofy melodrama is like hiring Fred Astaire and strapping a tractor on his back.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Its moments of fascination and its good performances are mired in the morass of romance and melodrama that surrounds it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The movie was produced by Seinfeld, and protects him. The visuals tend toward the dim, the gray and the washed-out, and you wish instead of spending a year with their store-boughts, they'd spent a month and used the leftover to hire a cinematographer.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Too cluttered and busy, but as a glimpse into the affluent culture of a country with economic extremes, it's intriguing. Occasionally it's funny and moving, too.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    America's Sweethearts recycles "Singin' in the Rain" but lacks the sassy genius of that 1952 musical, which is still the best comedy ever made about Hollywood.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    So enigmatic, oblique and meandering that it's like coded religious texts that requires monks to decipher.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The skill of the actors, who invest their characters with small touches of humanity, is useful in distracting us from the emotional manipulations, but it's like they're brightening separate rooms of a haunted house.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A movie that doesn't buy into all the tenets of our national sports religion; the subtext is that winning isn't everything.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It isn't bad so much as it lacks any ambition to be more than it so obviously is.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    A dim-witted but visually intriguing movie.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    The actors are splendid, especially Sarah Polley and Sean Penn, but we never feel confident that these two plots fit together, belong together, or work together.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Might be fun for younger teenagers who want to be reassured that people in their 30s still behave like younger teenagers.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    What we get in Analyze That are several talented actors delivering their familiar screen personas in the service of an idiotic plot.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    It might work on video for viewers who glance up at the screen from time to time. The more attention you pay to it, the less it's there.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    All of this is intriguing material, but the movie doesn't do much with it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Overcrowded and overwritten, with too many shrill denunciations and dramatic surprises; we don't like the characters and, worse, they don't interest us.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Spike Lee misjudged his material and audience. He doesn't find a successful way to express his feelings, angers and satirical points.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Not the worst of the countless recent movies about good kids and hidebound, authoritatian older people. It may, however, be the most shameless in its attempt to pander to an adolescent audience.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Ebert
    Strange, how good feardotcom is, and how bad. The screenplay is a mess, and yet the visuals are so creative this is one of the rare bad films you might actually want to see.

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