For 4,075 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Wonder Boys
Lowest review score: 0 Chaos
Score distribution:
4,075 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Spellbinding.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Leigh's Another Year is like a long, purifying soak in empathy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Bahrani, as director, not only stays out of the way of the simplicity of his story, but relies on it; less is more, and with restraint he finds a grimy eloquence.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No actor is better than Bill Murray at doing nothing at all, and being fascinating while not doing it. Buster Keaton had the same gift for contemplating astonishing developments with absolute calm. Buster surrounded himself with slapstick, and in Broken Flowers Jim Jarmusch surrounds Murray with a parade of formidable women.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    One of the year's best films for a lot of reasons, including its ability to involve the audience almost breathlessly in a story of mounting tragedy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie is as lovable as a silent comedy, which it could have been.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The best performance in the film is by Arestrup as Cesar. You may remember him from Audiard's "The Beat That My Heart Skipped" (2005), where he played a seedy but confident father who psychically overshadows his son.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There is mostly sadness and regret at the surface in 4 Little Girls, but there is anger in the depths, as there should be.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I've never seen a movie so sad in which there was so much genuine laughter. The Accidental Tourist is one of the best films of the year.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Has the quality of many great films, in that it always seems alive.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Disturbing, analytical and morose. This is not a "political" film nor yet another screed about the Bush administration or the war in Iraq. It is driven simply, powerfully, by the desire to understand those photographs.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    However much it conceals the real-life events that inspired it, it lives and breathes on its own, and as an extension of the mysterious whimsy of Tati.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Brilliant and heartbreaking, takes place in the present but is timeless.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It comes closer to reflecting the current state of race relations in America than any other movie of our time.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The film's ending is improbably upbeat: Magic realism, in a sense. It works as a deliverance. Dennis Foon's screenplay is based on the novel "Chanda's Secrets" by Canadian writer Allan Stratton. It is a parable with Biblical undertones, recalling "Cry, the Beloved Country."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It stands with integrity and breaks our hearts.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is told from and by an adult sensibility that understands loneliness, gratitude and the intense curiosity we feel for other lives, man and beast.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It's one of the great moviegoing experiences.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Sometimes two performances come along that are so perfectly matched that no overt signals are needed to show how the characters feel about each other. That's what happens between Melissa Leo and Misty Upham in Frozen River.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The funniest American comedy of the year.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There’s joy in watching a movie like You, the Living. It is flawless in what it does, and we have no idea what that is. It’s in sympathy with its characters. It shares their sorrow, and yet is amused that each thinks his suffering is unique.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Apart from its pure entertainment value - this is the best American crime movie in years - it is an important statement about a time and a condition that should not be forgotten. The Academy loves to honor prestigious movies in which long-ago crimes are rectified in far-away places. Here is a nominee with the ink still wet on its pages.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Bresson suggests that we are all Balthazars. Despite our dreams, hopes and best plans, the world will eventually do with us whatever it does.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    If I were asked to say with certainty which movies will still be widely known a century or two from now, I would list "2001,'' "The Wizard of Oz,'' Keaton and Chaplin, Astaire and Rogers, and probably "Casablanca'' ... and "Star Wars,'' for sure.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a grown-up movie, in its humor and in its wisdom about life. You need to have lived a little to understand the complexities of Tobias Allcott, who is played by James Coburn with a pitch-perfect balance between sadness and sardonic wit.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Here is a film of great beauty and attention, and watching it is a form of meditation. Sometimes films take a great stride outside the narrow space of narrative tradition and present us with things to think about. Here mostly what I thought was, why must man sometimes be so cruel?
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Forget about the plot, the characters, the intrigue, which are all splendid in House of Flying Daggers, and focus just on the visuals.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    No movie has had a greater impact on the way people looked. The music of course is immortal.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Arnold deserves comparison with a British master director like Ken Loach.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I saw Tarzan once, and went to see it again. This kind of bright, colorful, hyperkinetic animation is a visual exhilaration.

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