For 4,340 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Ebert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Howards End
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
4340 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This is a film for intelligent people who are naturally curious about what happens when the shutters close.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I swear to you that if you live in a place where this film is playing, it is the best film in town.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    It is refreshing to see Cruz acting in the culture and language that is her own. As it did with Sophia Loren in the 1950s, Hollywood has tried to force Cruz into a series of show-biz categories, when she is obviously most at home playing a woman like the ones she knew, grew up with, could have become.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This time the dad is the hero of the story, although in most animation it is almost always the mother.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This happens in 1961, when 16-year-old girls were a great deal less knowing than they are now. Yet the movie isn't shabby or painful, but romantic and wonderfully entertaining.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    There are scenes here that are funnier than those of any other movie this year, and other scenes that weep with the pain of sad family secrets, and when it's over we have seen some kind of masterpiece. This is one of the best films of the year.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    In its warmth and in its enchantment, as well as in its laughs, this is the best comedy in a long time.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Not many movies know that truth. Moonlight Mile is based on it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film embodies ideas. After the immediate experience begins to fade, the implications remain and grow.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    You can live in a movie like this.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What is remarkable is how realistic the story is.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I enjoyed The Truman Show on its levels of comedy and drama; I liked Truman in the same way I liked Forrest Gump--because he was a good man, honest, and easy to sympathize with.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    I don't know when I've seen a thriller more frightening. I couldn't tear my eyes from the screen. Collapse is even entertaining, in a macabre sense. I think you owe it to yourself to see it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Some kind of sweet, wacky masterpiece.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Like "Citizen Kane," Pulp Fiction is constructed in such a nonlinear way that you could see it a dozen times and not be able to remember what comes next.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The style here is so seductive and witty it's hard to pin down. It's like nothing else I've seen by Hill, and at times, it almost reminds me of Jacques Tati crossed with Robert Altman. It's good to get a crime movie more concerned with humor and character than with blood and gore; here's one, as we say, for the whole family.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    As a thriller, Munich is efficient, absorbing, effective. As an ethical argument, it is haunting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This movie moves so confidently and looks so good it seems incredible that it's a directorial debut.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Not just a thriller, not just a social commentary, not just a comedy or a romance, but all of those in a clearly seen, brilliantly made film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Is the film watchable? Yes, compulsively.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Dawn of the Dead is one of the best horror films ever made -- and, as an inescapable result, one of the most horrifying. It is gruesome, sickening, disgusting, violent, brutal and appalling. It is also (excuse me for a second while I find my other list) brilliantly crafted, funny, droll, and savagely merciless in its satiric view of the American consumer society. Nobody ever said art had to be in good taste.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    Many of the scenes in No Country for Old Men are so flawlessly constructed that you want them to simply continue, and yet they create an emotional suction drawing you to the next scene. Another movie that made me feel that way was "Fargo." To make one such film is a miracle. Here is another.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A Room with a View enjoys its storytelling so much that I enjoyed the very process of it. The story moved slowly, it seemed, for the same reason you try to make ice cream last: because it's so good.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    May
    The movie subtly darkens its tone until, when the horrifying ending arrives, we can see how we got there. There is a final shot that would get laughs in another kind of film, but May earns the right to it, and it works, and we understand it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    An endlessly surprising, very dark, human comedy, with a plot that cannot be foreseen but only relished.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    This film is such a virtuoso high-wire act, daring so much, achieving it with such grace and skill. Minority Report reminds us why we go to the movies in the first place.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    A grand, romantic life story about love, loss, regret and the sadness that can be evoked by a violin - not only through music, but through the instrument itself. It is all melancholy and loss, and delightfully comedic, with enough but not too much magic realism. The story as it stands could be the scenario for an opera.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    King of the Hill could have been a family picture, or a heartwarming TV docudrama, or a comedy. Soderbergh must have seen more deeply into the Hotchner memoir, however, because his movie is not simply about what happens to the kid. It's about how the kid learns and grows through his experiences.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    What a simple and yet profound story this is.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Roger Ebert
    The first shot tells us 45365 is the zip code of the town." In this achingly beautiful film, that zip code belongs to Sidney, Ohio, a handsome town of about 20,000 residents.

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