For 45 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sara Smith's Scores

Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 True Detective: Season 1
Lowest review score: 30 The Strain: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 30 out of 45
  2. Negative: 2 out of 45
45 tv reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Sara Smith
    After True Detective, all the other TV cops hunting serial killers are going to look like copycats. It’s that the taut script and spot-on dialogue takes us on a ’90s noir roller coaster ride of Shakespearean tragedy with fearless literary aspirations, delivered by two actors at the top of their game.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Sara Smith
    The result is a challenging psychological thriller within a gripping crime procedural.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    [A] smart espionage drama.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Ripper Street was clever enough not to hang its hat on the over-examined killings of the five Ripper victims, and clever fans of police procedurals will relish spending eight hours with cops who have to invent the crime-solving tools at their disposal.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    It brings its own style of spine-tingling dysfunction to the screen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Flawless production design and lush cinematography make Rectify visually stunning, but its simmering mystery and artfully depicted dysfunction make every scene hum with tension.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    The freshest take on the single-camera mockumentary since “Curb Your Enthusiasm.”
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Ray Donovan is undeniably derivative, but it sure is fun. Liev Schreiber leads a stellar cast as Ray Donovan.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Orange is scary, smart and relevant, and it will make you wonder why no one thought to give the “Oz” formula a dose of estrogen before now.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Paired with the endearing self-awareness and cerebral nods to pop culture Whedon brings to his best projects, it’s the perfect setup for fall’s most promising new TV show.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Although it’s a medical drama on one level, Masters of Sex is frequently laugh-out-loud funny, with romances, mysteries and coming-of-age stories unfolding throughout its large cast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    While its premise isn’t new--anyone remember “Total Recall 2070” or “Mann and Machine”?--the show’s ambition, solid cast and pure production values make it a worthwhile diversion.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    In its second season, House of Cards is just like its main character: clever, ruthless, a bit too self-satisfied and surprisingly powerful.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Sometimes slasher flick, sometimes courtroom drama, this Lizzie is a cynically dark, shamefully fun account of an all-American crime.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Walton and Stockham are a seamless comedy team straight out of the gate. Their banter is more salty and cynical than sappy, but that’s how it gets to you.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Penny Dreadful is a smart, self-referential Dracula vs. the Wolf-Man vs. Frankenstein concept delivering the scares, chills and laughs that summer TV needs.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    [The pasts of the ladies at Litchfield] are less “Shawshank Redemption” than “Goodfellas,” with every episode using sparse, smartly edited scenes to tell one inmate’s story.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Thanks to its excellent cast, led by Nat Faxon and Judy Greer as Russ and Lina, Married rises above its cliched setup.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    It’s Gretchen and Jimmy’s repartee, their unrelenting need to voice their awful thoughts, that makes Worst worth watching.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Every time the 1943 of Manhattan begins to feel like 2014, it returns to the nostalgia of movies like “The Right Stuff,” where brains and grit make the peace, back to a time when America trusted its fate to the smartest guys we could find.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Sara Smith
    Like “True Detective,” The Knick benefits from a consistent vision and stellar cinematography. Its turn-of-the-century sets and costuming will transport viewers into the past more vividly than any stuffy sitting room in “Downton Abbey.” But it requires dedication to stick around with The Knick until the action gets going a few episodes in.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Sara Smith
    Those who accept it for what it is--a funny, manipulative soap that relies on historical upheaval to frame its scarce plots--should be happy to hear that Downton’s new season is better than its last.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Sara Smith
    Deception borrows a lot from that show and others, ending up more fun than challenging.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Sara Smith
    Mr. Selfridge really gets rolling in its third and fourth episodes, when its interlocking stories and Piven’s outsize performance settle into place.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Sara Smith
    Some critics called the book incisive and addictive, while others dismissed it as pulpy and juvenile. Under the Dome checks all those boxes in Monday’s pilot episode.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Sara Smith
    A year after the Rosie Larsen case ended, this new chapter is compelling enough to earn some fan forgiveness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Sara Smith
    Lead writer Daniel Knauf, who created HBO’s “Carnivale,” has tweaked Bram Stoker’s classic tale in delightful, if heavy-handed ways.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Sara Smith
    The series hits its stride a few episodes in, when Lowe and Blackbeard finally get on a boat together to fight a common enemy, knowing they’re each just waiting for the right moment to kill the other. Their dynamic evokes the tense partnership between Al Swearengen and Sheriff Bullock in "Deadwood."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Sara Smith
    It’s not that The Leftovers isn’t great storytelling, because it is. It’s just befuddling, violent and sad--more and more all the time, with no satisfaction in sight. Theroux is flat-out fantastic and Emmy-worthy in this role.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Sara Smith
    It’s a pleasure to watch Bean fall into his “legends,” or fake identities, even as the show pushes the boundaries of what TV audiences might accept when it comes to instantaneous computer heroics.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Sara Smith
    The Following, compelling and frustrating from its opening credits, sets viewers up for a season-long, blood-soaked rematch between an evil intellectual and his law-enforcement nemesis.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Sara Smith
    Rocha, combined with the new format of The Face, creates a real threat to the Tyra empire.... [But] The Face, with a focus on posing, strutting and styling in its first few weeks, has room to fall.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Sara Smith
    The Bridge will no doubt tie all these threads together in 13 well-executed episodes, after a lot of red herrings, victims killed in horrific ways and one final twist. It’s guaranteed to be a depressing journey, and it’s starting to feel like one we’ve been on before.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Smith
    If the film sins against history, it's in the many omissions of intriguing minutiae that made the book worthwhile.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Smith
    Behind the Candelabra isn’t a smear job, but it’s not a revelation, either.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Smith
    It’s a fascinating visual ride. But without heroes worth rooting for or a victim worth avenging, the rubble heaps of an imploded metropolis can only do so much heavy lifting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Smith
    Showrunner Julian Fellowes knew he had to spice things up, apparently, so he employed a lazy, “shocking” plot device that will leave fans sickened, indignant and wondering why Fellowes just didn’t give his beloved characters something worthwhile to do instead. That offensive event aside, this season’s repetitive tropes, recycled conflicts and predictable heartbreak are not worth the trouble this time around.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Smith
    Holliday Grainger and Emile Hirsch are pretty great as Bonnie and Clyde, despite a just-servicable script to explain how Clyde won Bonnie’s anxiety-ridden, artistic heart.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Smith
    Alongside Roth, Shepard and talented character actor Tim Blake Nelson, Madden pulls off the sometimes treacly dialogue, but the insistent no-duh musings (“the die has been cast”) wear thin quickly.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sara Smith
    Simmons, who was Juno’s dad and Brenda Leigh Johnson’s boss, is consistently funny and compelling, but the younger cast members haven’t settled into their roles yet, and the show doesn’t know what to do with them, anyway.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Sara Smith
    The show could use a return to what made it great in the first place: [Sookie and friends] battling monsters with the help of benevolent, attractive bloodsuckers.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Sara Smith
    Black Sails is exactly like the 18th-century Caribbean pirates it brings to life: dirty, amoral and worth stomaching only when there are no women around.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Sara Smith
    Lifetime goes there, then backs away from the issue immediately, making for some scenes that add nothing to the story but brief bouts of nausea.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Sara Smith
    Mamet has supplied Phil Spector with his signature rapid-fire dialogue, but nameless attorneys and consultants interrupting one another only set the table for more tiresome time with Pacino.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Sara Smith
    The show’s recycled vampire mythology fails to justify this level of bloodletting, which even fans of “The Walking Dead” might find gratuitous.