For 377 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sara Stewart's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Broken Circle Breakdown
Lowest review score: 0 10 Rules for Sleeping Around
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 80 out of 377
377 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Director Uberto Pasolini (“Machan”) has a gem in Marsan, a virtuoso actor who plays the role delicately where another might have laid on the pathos too thick.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    It’s not quite “Once,” but Song One, featuring original music by Jenny Lewis and Johnathan Rice, captures a similar, unselfconscious beauty in the way music can make sense of big, ungainly emotions — as James puts it, “for three to five whole minutes.”
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Girlhood veers between being a celebration of sisterhood (albeit an occasionally violent sort) and a chronicle of the cycle of poverty.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Ryan Reynolds is chillingly perfect as a nice-guy factory worker struggling with schizophrenia and murderous impulses in this tonally wild indie, which is nearly too horrifying to be funny — but not quite.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The film never pretends to be other than what it really is: soft-core porn for the ladies, diluted with an “R” rating.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    A few university officials talk on camera, but not many do, and it will be fascinating to watch the fallout from this scathing indictment of a system that, the movie claims, has all but encouraged sexual predators to do their worst.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    As they’re akin to spectators at a magic show, viewers ought to keep an eye out for what the Merchants of Doubt don’t want us to see.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Only in his early 20s, Zephyr Benson makes a remarkably assured debut as writer, director and star of Straight Outta Tompkins, his tongue-in-cheek title for his past as a middle-class drug dealer in lower Manhattan.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Unlike many working in this genre, Mitchell doesn’t punish young women for having sex: This is a gender-blind demonic delivery vehicle.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The very German lack of emotion is so acute it can be hard to tell when Hausner’s playing for laughs, but Friedel is hilariously — if morbidly — tedious as the tortured writer whose pickup line is, “Would you care to die with me?”
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Though Valderrama gives a standout performance as the avenging Angel, brother of the late Jesus (Kareem Savion), two smaller roles are also worthy of note: Paz de la Huerta as a spacy bartender at Pianos, and J. Bernard Calloway as Dre, a bouncer who’s seen it all, and who can be reliably found eating a healthy salad as he sits outside his nightspot.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    On the whole, though, you couldn’t do much better than Monkey Kingdom to get kids invested in learning about, and protecting, the natural world.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Crowe makes the most of his own quiet presence, and this ode to the world’s never-recovered soldiers and their families is a fitting meditation on the insanity of war.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Vinterberg aces the metaphor-heavy scene in which Troy demonstrates his swordsmanship for an inexperienced, dazzled Bathsheba.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Marie’s Story will feel familiar, which is mostly a tribute to the enduring power of Helen Keller’s biography.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Subtle, sometimes really sad and honest about the struggles of adolescence, Marnie is a worthy last entry from Ghibli before the studio reportedly goes on hiatus.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Grim but worthwhile.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Schwartzman is perfect as Kurt, simultaneously compelling, ridiculous and creepy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Amy
    Two of Winehouse’s oldest friends also contribute, giving deeply sad accounts of watching their goofy, fearless pal disappear into a haze of flashbulbs and self-destruction.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    The film spirals steadily downward through humanity’s worst impulses as the guards, led by Angarano’s character, explore the free rein they’re given to torment the powerless.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Whether you’re a veteran Brando-phile or a newcomer, Listen to Me Marlon is a totally fascinating glimpse into the making (and unmaking, and remaking) of a legend.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Debut director Marielle Heller’s spent a lot of time with this material — she wrote and starred in an off-Broadway adaptation — and her confident direction of Powley, Skarsgård and Wiig, fused with a Polaroid-evocative palette and a glam ’70s soundtrack, makes this an indelible coming-of-age story.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Mistress America never falters in its case study of a complicated female friendship.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    They’re the ditziest, most solipsistic protagonists I’ve seen outside of a Neil LaBute project.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Per Swanberg’s signature style, the dialogue is largely improvised, the performances loose and funny. This may be his most star-studded cast yet, but the work is as intimate (“mumblecore” is so passé) as ever.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Feels like an homage to the early work of Wes Anderson with its plinky soundtrack, solipsistic banter and emphasis on uniforms.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Casting aside warnings and physical threats from the townspeople, this once-demure teen girl embraces her wild side with a gory, punk-rock abandon.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Director Jay Karas doesn’t exactly reinvent the wheel as he puts this odd couple through the paces of getting in shape and reconciling old wounds, but he’s helped by some laugh-out-loud quirk in Gene Hong’s screenplay, nice comic chemistry between the two leads and supporting players like J.K. Simmons.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    In Zhang’s capable hands, their love story — in which Yanshi masquerades as various workmen in order to see his wife and attempt to jog her memory — is elegantly touching, as is the slow repair of the relationship between father and daughter.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Sara Stewart
    Like the film itself, it’s simple but well-executed enough.

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