Stanley Kauffmann
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For 456 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stanley Kauffmann's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Truman Show
Lowest review score: 0 Miller's Crossing
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 456
456 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    More amusing than exciting. [19 June 1989, p.28]
    • The New Republic
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    It is easy to point out gaps in Noujaim's account. (What, for instance, about the rebuilding that tries to go forward in Iraq?) But the prime importance of this film, I'd say, is that it is not an eye-opener. Of course this change in reporting, this bilateralism, has occurred so far only in wars where the U.S. was the overwhelming superior in force.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    Eastwood has never seemed less the persona he has built through the decades, the calm yet commanding center of a storm.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    Flies into the improbable at its big moments. [17 Mar 1997, p. 28]
    • The New Republic
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    Little more than the distended first half of a twisty, dark "Law & Order" script.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    The flaw that separates Scorsese's film into its components is its lack of a crystallized theme.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    This same film, shot for shot, line for line, could have been much more solid and engrossing, much farther up the Parnassian slope, with a better actor as Hughes.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    The film's title ought to be When We Were King's Pawns. Don King maximized the media circus aspects from the start, as the razzle-dazzle directing of Leon Gast, helped in the editing by Taylor Hackford and others, makes electrically clear.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    None of the people in the film is realized as a character: Cronenberg has no interest in character. Each person is given a dab of characteristics and is then sent off to copulate. [21Apr1997 Pg 26]
    • The New Republic
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    As in all fiercely realistic thrillers, the action becomes less and less credible as it speeds on. But, as with some such thrillers, we tolerate the incredible as the price of the pulse-quickening.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    The war is not scanted: the devastation and butchery are there. But the screenplay by Frank Cottell Boyce, based on a non-fiction account by Michael Nicholson, is thin, sentimental. [29Dec1997 Pg. 28]
    • The New Republic
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    Holofcener, who studied film at Columbia and has directed shorts, gets some sprightliness into her writing but not much difference in characterization between the two women. [12 Aug 1996, Pg.26]
    • The New Republic
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    Why, then, is the picture chilling? Because it is a calm reminder of an inevitability. The sight of long lines of young women doing tiny bits of attachment work or packing hour after hour, day after day, is saddening.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Stanley Kauffmann
    The picture is so suavely made that we don't feel disappointed until it is over: what chiefly holds us is the quality of the acting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    The one attraction in the picture is DiCaprio's performance: easy yet strong, confident, humorous.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    This sort of investigation has been done so masterfully by Sam Peckinpah in "The Wild Bunch" and Oliver Stone in "Natural Born Killers" that, in a sternly utilitarian sense, we don't need Cronenberg. He is not, as far as I have seen, in their class. He proves it again in A History of Violence.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    The picture is too long. It repeats and repeats. Thirty minutes, instead of its eighty-six, could have told us all we need to know about the danger and tedium of these lives.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    The picture's effect: the sexual element is trenchant, while the status of Muslim youth registers strongly.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    The film is repetitious. Herzog has varied the original footage with some interviews that he conducted with a former Treadwell girlfriend and some other friends and observers. Still, an hour of it would have been more effective than the present feature length.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    Yet the McCarthy/Murrow conflict in the picture is not pressing enough--these days, anyway--to justify the considerable skill expended on it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    All these mystical elements are so sententiously handled and bump into one another so clumsily that they make the film seem nutty. But because spirituality is the theme of Bee Season, we are obviously not meant to laugh at it. Well, I wish I could get Jehovah's reaction to the picture.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    This Jeffrey Hatcher-Kimberly Simi version, directed by Lasse Hallström, has a resemblance to some of Casanova's memoirs but is chiefly based on the assumption that, in a costume drama, anything goes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    Malick continues to float along the edge of the American film world as an unusually intelligent personage who occasionally delivers the fruit of his meditations. But his role as adjunct philosophe is better than the films he eventually gives us.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    Less would have been more. Still, CSA has some laughs, most of them bitter.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    We may indeed yawn a bit from time to time, but we know that we are yawning in the presence of a director who is intelligently disturbed by the moral inertia he sees around him and whose future is worth watching.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    The danger in Hong's procedure is obvious. Dramatists learned long ago that it is risky to include a static character because he may so easily bore the audience.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    A moderately engaging satire, some of it amusing and some of it strained, but in considerable measure it reflects a strange circumstance in all our lives.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    The screenplay is at the start far from lucid in setting forth characters and relationships and intents. And after the film has been barreling along for two hours of its 148-minute journey, it seems to have lost the ability to finish. Three or four times in the last half-hour, I thought the film was over, only to be jarred by more of it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    Despite the pictorial riches, despite the firm performances by Ray Winstone as the captain and Guy Pearce as Charlie Burns, despite the miraculous John Hurt in an eccentric role that was put in just for spice, The Proposition is hollow.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Stanley Kauffmann
    Only the onstage performing has moments of lift, particularly Keillor's diabolically homespun monologues and the cowboys with their risqué jokes that are reminders of such outhouse reading as Captain Billy's Whiz Bang.