Steve Macfarlane
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For 61 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 24% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 72% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steve Macfarlane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Goodbye to Language 3D
Lowest review score: 0 Third Person
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 61
  2. Negative: 22 out of 61
61 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Macfarlane
    For American viewers who don't know, the doc will be a worthy footnote to a long bout of deliberate cultural amnesia, but it's too telling that the Vietnamese remain in the background.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Macfarlane
    Level Five pictorializes the cruel moment when curiosity encounters tragedy, and the all-too-human abandonment of interest that can follows.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    What first feels like a neurotic avoidance of Sol LeWitt the man instead becomes a kind of mirage of his life, as though he managed to evaporate into his body of work.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    The series is both a testimonial to the vagaries of chance and an endlessly cyclical study into the implications of being studied.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    This is a summer blockbuster contingent on grand bargains, tactical retreats, and a ferocious, inevitable shock-and-awe campaign.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    A film for those who, whether here or in Israel, believe the law is the beginning, and not the end, of rights discourse.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    The filmmakers spend vastly more time chronicling bigoted remarks from Romanians about gypsy life than they do actual gypsy life, so a minor crisis of perspective hangs over Our School.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    By putting so much weight on his characters' speech, Alex Ross Perry's is an approach with honestly few contemporaries in American independent film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Mud
    The film ultimately succeeds thanks to small details, from its deep-fried lingo and the swampy texture of its location photography to its uniformly expert cast.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    A magnificently quizzical diagram of two ceaselessly inquiring minds in perfect tandem, like a raw X-ray of atomized creativity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Whatever your foreknowledge of low-budget Brooklyn dramedies, it's impossible that Gillian Robespierre's film won't lob you at least a few curveballs.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    A dazzling heist film that can't help but come off as duly influenced by Steven Soderbergh's Ocean's trilogy, South Korea's number one box-office champ of all time is never less than clever.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Macfarlane
    It foists its own retelling of Angela Davis's story over any contemplation of her politics, effectively neutering their power as it could apply to today in the hands of a proper film essayist.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    While the trivia value may feel tremendous, only One9's interviews with Nas, his father, Olu Dara, and his brother, Jungle, manage to make the doc legitimately moving--a history lesson in popular culture.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    With My Brother the Devil, writer-director Sally El Hosaini tells a story both operatic in its implications and quotidian in its sensory, day-to-day details.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steve Macfarlane
    Between their wildly different bodies of work, a shared appeal emerges: to stop, look, listen, and consider not just what's in front of you, but also where it came from and where it might be going.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Steve Macfarlane
    Cinema is a vernacular of domination, and quaking with revelations both formal and personal, the film attests that Godard has spent his career apologizing for it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Macfarlane
    Viewers' tolerance for Errol Morris's apparent sheepishness will hinge on their prior appreciation of the filmmaker's investigative acumen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Without a frame of footage nor a single interview presented from outside the camp, the documentary shows a capitalist nightmare that accords its victims zero wiggle room.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Opting for scenes that tend to be fragmented, flawed snippets from a much bigger story, the film exudes a bizarre confidence in not trying to encapsulate the singer's whole life in 120 minutes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    It shrugs off the bigger questions about Iranian politics its first half appears to raise, falling back instead on a gestalt of the eternal, Kafkaesque regime, wherever the viewer may find it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Dorothy Vogel is less the soft-spoken housewife from the first film than a businesswoman both shrewd and mousy, and her trajectory affords the film its closest semblance to a story.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steve Macfarlane
    Robert Pattinson's stare is almost thousand-yard enough to make the film's sense of tragedy feel downright Greek.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Steve Macfarlane
    A long string of picnics, portrait sessions, elaborate dinners, and countryside rituals, filtered through a svelte aesthetic pleasantness that ultimately corrodes its larger interests.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Macfarlane
    The film's clearest winner is Pat Healy, whose depiction of a man willing to corrode his entire life to provide for his wife and kid feels true despite the script's silliest moments.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Even if the film never transcends its subject matter, Jonathan Demme's light touch adds up to a charming portrait, only rarely fumbling into hagiography.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    The script is perspicacious in making Henrik's bad choices understandable enough emotionally, but also nudges the audience toward wishing the man would wise up.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Steve Macfarlane
    The film is too standard-issue in its making to probe beyond the rough outlines of a success story.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    To Keira Knightley's credit, she's all too willing to undercut her pretty-girl reputation by looking and acting a fool for Lynn Shelton's camera.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Steve Macfarlane
    Kevin Hart turns an essentially crude wingman into the conscience of the film's torturous, nettled discourse on romance.

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