For 1,973 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Gravity
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
1973 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A super-taut and superbly acted three-character piece.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hunger is daunting and powerful work.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Chronicle is full of smart writing that isn't too smart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Extraordinarily sensual and extraordinarily bleak, Claire Denis' Nenette and Boni depicts a world of diffident youth, of estranged families and displaced souls. [02 May 1997, p.15]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Stays with you like great movies tend to do. It asks you to examine the inner mechanisms of human beings, cheerful and miserable alike. It's not about looking at a glass half empty or a glass half full. It's about drinking down what's in that glass and letting it fill your soul.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The rare movie that manages to convey the inner soul of an artist.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a devilishly twisted affair.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Chuan's unsettlingly beautiful black-and-white, wide-screen account of those nightmare six weeks, re-creates that horror in ways that are at once allusive and lucid, mixing cinematic impressionism with documentary-like detail.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A story of companionship, loneliness, resilience. It's a small, artfully crafted thing, but it resonates in big ways.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Her life, and her work, transcended what we think of as "fashion."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Try not to let the film's overbearingly jaunty score get in the way. The Lady in the Van is quite a feat.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Although the pervading mood of Twin Falls Idaho - a beautifully shot, noirish thing - is one of sadness and loss, the Polishes' film is playful, too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Tcheng finds Simons in moments of haughty self-confidence and tremulous self-doubt.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A gorgeous confection, packed with gargantuan gowns and pornographic displays of pastrystuffs, Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette is also a sharp, smart look at the isolation, ennui and supercilious affairs of the rich, famous and famously pampered.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Rain is a quiet, disquieting triumph.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An amiable mix of "Grumpy Old Men" comedy and "Apollo 13" can-we-fix-this-jalopy-before-we-die? Drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    David Ayer, the writer of "Training Day," director of "Street Kings," writer/director of "Harsh Times," does not make movies about princesses with witchy curses, about yuppie commitment-phobes, about talking plush toys. His territory is narrow, but he owns it: cops, in Los Angeles.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Tender but never sappy, Monsieur Ibrahim brings two people of vastly different age and background together in ways that are touching, and telling. It's a small, glowing gem.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Roiling with laughter, tears, drunken confessions, revelatory soliloquies, pain, sorrow, hospital visits, and various kinds of love, A Christmas Tale is a smart, sprawling, and sublimely entertaining feast.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A sly and surprisingly sublime little noir romance.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A gorgeous operatic tale of obsession and madness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A beautifully mopey adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro's much-praised novel.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Career Girls doesn't have the sweep of Secrets & Lies, nor the venom of Naked (which also featured the riveting Cartlidge). But in the small world it keenly describes, the film packs an emotional punch - silly voices and all.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a movie with a pulse. Sometimes, it flies off the chart.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Into the Abyss is a true-crime drama, to be sure, but in Herzog's hands it becomes something much more: an inquiry into fundamental moral, philosophical, and religious issues, and an examination of humankind's capacity for violence - individual and institutional.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A bruising, dark comedy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A thinker and an educator, Zinn has led a life of commitment and compassion, and the film offers a loving tribute.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's great to hear a director talking candidly about the actors he's worked with, dishing out good, juicy stuff.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Does what the best movies can do: take viewers to what might be unfamiliar places, into a culture with unique customs and traditions, and show, through drama and comedy, how the fundamental truths of the human experience need no translation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Crash fools around with chronology in a Tarantinoesque way that brings its story full circle. You could argue that as events, and people, merge, Haggis' spiky screenplay (cowritten with Bobby Moresco) gets to be, quite simply, too much.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Mongol is great cinema, great fun.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Must-see stuff.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Offers a sometimes lyrical, sometimes gut-turning portrait of war seen through the eyes of children.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This beautiful, unfolding film is an antidote to the high-velocity, maximum-volume world most of us find ourselves immersed in, offering a glimpse into a rigorously spiritual alternative. Its calmness, its reflection, is full of allure.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Filled with bleak, beautiful Hopperesque tableaus and strange characters whose lives intersect.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    With its mix of Lewis Carroll and William Gibson; Japanese anime and Chinese chopsocky; mythological allusions, and machine-made illusion, offers a couple of hours of escapist fun.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Eastwood and Morgan's movie, with its epic natural disasters (and a terrifying, man-made one) is optimistic. Hokey, even. But it's beautiful, too.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Its stars - especially the photogenic Leung and Cheung, fresh from Wong Kar Wai's jazzy romance In the Mood for Love - are wonderfully charismatic. And wonderfully athletic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Quiet, quirky gem.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Fused with paranoia and almost unbearable suspense, The Hurt Locker is powerful stuff.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    At once guileless and profound.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Proposition, a beautiful, bloody meditation on justice, family, and the trap of retribution, is in every respect an artful addition to the canon of six-shooter morality tales.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    In the end, what the movie is about: time and life, and what we do with them, and what we regret that we didn't do.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is magnificent filmmaking, and a magnificent film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The less said about the twists and turns The Illusionist takes, the better. Suffice to say, Eisenheim's masterful deceptions do not stop when he exits the stage.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It is the more satisfying of the two installments - less over-the-top, arterial-gushing violence and more investigation into character, motives, back-story.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An extraordinarily perfect little film: A bittersweet drama that explores sexuality and love, and their reverberations across the landscape of human emotions.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    How I Live Now takes some frightening, gruesome turns. In tone and terror, it comes close to matching the jumpy dread of Danny Boyle's British Isles virus thriller "28 Days Later."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Impossibly charming and impossibly French.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    While The Forgiveness of Blood lacks the narrative momentum of director Joshua Marston's previous film, "Maria Full of Grace" - it is nonetheless fascinating.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A smart, sensuous and sensory mind trip that caroms around a universe of thought.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A film full of a sense of impending danger, betrayal, seduction and destruction. Quite simply, it's great stuff.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A spectacularly satisfying reworking of the legend of Kal-El.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Resonant and surprisingly affecting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A slow-burning, character-rich study in desperation, grief, vengeance, loyalty, and love. It's the sort of arthouse entry - in German, mostly - that gets you thinking about an English-language remake.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Beautifully shot, in long, fluid takes, The Beat That My Heart Skipped is that rare thing: a remake that improves on its source.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Brings home the complexities and contradictions of the man.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A smart, sharp, stirring adaptation of the H.G. Bissinger best-seller.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There are some terrifically strong scenes and terrific actors contributing to them.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Odd, and awkward in places, but its lyricism and power stay with you.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Francofonia is a brilliant meditation on art, on war - and what happens to art when nations go to war.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Jolting, suspenseful, full of twisted sympathy for its goons' row of characters, and wickedly amusing to boot, Killing Them Softly summons up the ghosts of "Goodfellas" and a whole nasty tradition of crime pics. And then it lets its ghosts go, whacking and thwacking away.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a charmer.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Quietly and keenly observed, Summer Hours nods to Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard" (a country estate, a family reunion, an impending sale). Assayas displays a lucid sense of how personal history and family identity are inextricably linked to a physical place - here, to a house that is still busy accumulating its memories.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is Highsmith, and so things do not go as planned for her protagonists. The Two Faces of January - drop-dead gorgeous to behold - is not a merry tale, but a murderous one. Murderously good.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A funny, sad and absolutely lovely film.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Brian Cox is especially good, and slippery, as Menenius, a Roman senator.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Hoax makes the fakery of disgraced writers Jayson Blair, James Frey and Stephen Glass seem puny by comparison. Irving was the grand master, and Gere's portrait and Hallström's movie suggest why: He almost bought his own story, believed his own outrageous pack of lies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Monaghan is stronger still. This is a performance that deserves to be noticed. She is crushingly good.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    How the film plays out, and what happens to the boy and the adults in his company, may prove a revelation, or a disappointment, or something in between. But getting there is thrilling and wondrously strange.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A darkly comic, piercing, and occasionally painful study of a young woman's quest for identity.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a beautiful, grim tale.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Leaves you feeling rich - and richly satisfied.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A rollicking tale of rehabilitation and redemption, rife with cool special effects, Hancock is smart and surprisingly raunchy.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Dardennes are aces at these small-scale human dramas, and Two Days, One Night is almost without flaw.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Made in a forthright, unfancy style and utilizing a cast of born naturals, Washington Heights deftly draws parallels between father and son's complicated relationship and the tensions that pulse through this predominantly Dominican American community.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a feminist nightmare, the world brought to life -- in hard-hitting documentary style.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Fear(s) of the Dark, a French production, interweaves the shorts, linking the segments together thematically, and narratively.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A spirited, smart-alecky look at the ongoing conflict between a government that wants to eliminate pot and a public that wants to smoke it.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Ergüven's film, beautifully shot and beautifully performed, cuts its storybook tone with starker, more brutal truths. Anger - aimed at a conservative social order and those complicit in maintaining it - courses through this sad, striking tale.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a celebration of the good times and bad times shared by a man and woman who found each other in the middle of some historic craziness, and it rocks.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The story of Donald Crowhurst is not one of remarkable courage or remarkable endurance. But it is remarkable.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Selma may be flawed, even spurious at points. But in its larger portrait of a man of dignity, purpose, and courage, and in Oyelowo's performance as that man, the film rings true.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A riveting documentary.

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