For 1,974 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Descendants
Lowest review score: 0 The Mangler
Score distribution:
1974 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A riveting documentary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A heartbreaking story of true love.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A wonderful, witty mix of horror and social satire, The Host takes its simple, time-tested premise - menacing creature terrorizes the populace - and runs with it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Exhilarating, alternately funny and horrific film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Pray has a great story here, but it's much more than just "The Brady Bunch's Endless Summer."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    If Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter takes its time, it's time worth taking. The cinematography is lovely: great swirls of midnight snow, frosted trees in glinting sun, the bustling modernity of Tokyo, a big library, subway stations exquisite in their orderliness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's nothing mean-spirited, or judgmental, about the way Morris goes about his business - he must have been kicking himself with glee as one bizarre strand of the story unravels to reveal the next.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Presented with an economy and emotional cool that add to, rather than subtract from, its dramatic impact, The Girl on the Train reverberates with a quiet, seductive power.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    White God offers a dark - very dark - take on the way humans exert authority, and superiority, over our fellow creatures.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Has a dreamy ominousness about it, and a sorrowfulness that speaks to the artificial intimacies of cellular communication, digital images and dial-up porn.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An entertaining, occasionally illuminating autodocumentary.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's whimsy and raunchy humor here, but also an underlying sense of darkness and despair.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Charming is such an overused, film critic-y designation, but The Way Home is that, and more.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Things get a little tricky by the end, but it's the sort of trickery that's immensely satisfying.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Sly, sophisticated and surprising.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Marwencol is about Hogancamp and his miniature alter-ego, about his photographs and his creative process. But it is also, on a deeper level, about how we process our experiences - good and bad, violent and mysterious - and how we try to build safe places in our lives.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A taut, tricky thriller.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's complicated. And it's fascinating.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A crushingly sad, beautiful film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Gripping, powerful, heart-breaking.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Kore-eda, deploying a Western pop score by the Japanese indie-rock band Quruli, just lets these kids be kids.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Simply put, it's terrific.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Disturbingly good. The writing and the performances are such that as things go from bad (sad motel-room affairs) to worse (a 4-year-old gone missing), the film's characters get inside your skin, your soul. It's enough to make you want to cry.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    If Munich raises disturbing issues about Jewish-Arab relations, past and present - and how can it not? - it is also an absolutely riveting tale of the hunt and the hunted.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    13 Tzameti is cut from the same cloth as the humans-hunted-for-sport classic "The Most Dangerous Game" - and from that early talkie's many subsequent remakes and rip-offs, including John Woo's "Hard Target."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Splendid, smile-inducing fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A kind of deadpan soap opera - but one that, despite its high melodrama and wicked humor, delivers a real emotional wallop.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Not just a great sports movie, Harvard Beats Yale 29-29 captures a pivotal moment in recent history.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This story of two very old souls who suck on O negative Popsicles is, in many ways, more about the life-sustaining force of music than any hankering for blood.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hopped-up and electrifying. The soundtrack is wall-to-wall and propulsive.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is the kind of unusual but involving picture that's ripe for a Hollywood remake - but while you're waiting for the Sandra Bullock-Ethan Hawke edition (it's a good post-movie game: coming up with your own casting ideas), Read My Lips is well worth checking out.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Clean, director Olivier Assayas' spellbinding study of a junkie trying to get her life in order so she can reclaim custody of her child, avoids the pitfalls, brilliantly.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This long (nearly three hours), revelatory movie is both a thrilling adventure about endurance and survival, and an elegiac examination of centuries-old tribal culture, fast-fading in the new millennium.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Quiet, watchful, out for himself, Sorowitsch is a complicated figure - neither hero nor villain, and certainly no fool. The Austrian actor Markovics is riveting in the role; he is wiry, anticipatory, his eyes darting with intelligence and worry.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's transformative.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's pretty much impossible not to love Sing Street's young hero as he stumbles around Dublin, dumbstruck and smitten, at turns clueless and confident.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A fine, inventive '70s period piece about friendship, first love, and growing up to face the hard lessons of life.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A small, beautiful film exploding with big ideas.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An eerily quiet, bracingly bloody, and expertly laid-out adaptation of the Cormac McCarthy novel.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A sweet but unsticky comedy from Norway that was one of the five foreign- language nominees at this year's Academy Awards.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The relationship between Chris and his diminutive namesake is at the core of the film - the determination to be there for his son, no matter what; the mentoring, the pair's goofy, lovely banter. And Smith and his bright-eyed boy pull it off brilliantly.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Cooler is small-scale moviemaking about small-scale lives. But it's big in all the right ways.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is a sad, passionate, beautifully wrought story, and Bardem's portrait of Arenas is at once daring and deeply moving.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    You can feel the world closing in, which, I would venture, is exactly how Fassbinder wanted you to feel.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The film's save-the-world scenario may be the stuff of crusty cliff-hangers, its imagery may be borrowed, and its jaunty dialogue anything but deep, but there's something exhilarating going on here. It's darn sublime.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Golden Door feels, at points, like a silent film - a silent film with CinemaScope vistas and dazzling, saturated color.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Exhilarating and tragic.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Like "The Square," the startling Down Under noir released a few months ago, Animal Kingdom explores the down and dirty side of human nature, fraught with greed, suspicion, and betrayal.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The dialogue and action in One False Move seems instinctive and unforced. There isn't an iota of caricature, there isn't an affectation of "style," there isn't a false note sounded.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's real joy in O'Day's eyes - and larynx - as she bobs and weaves through an amazing songbook.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    As in David Lean's "Brief Encounter," the suspense in Cairo Time comes from what doesn't happen between its pair of "lovers."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Linklater's film adaptation succeeds in bringing the flamboyant Welles to life.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    On a deeper level, the Dardennes' film offers a portrait of a fragile yet determined woman set on making a home for herself in the world, even as that world unravels before her eyes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Thoroughly engaging.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    By recording this all too commonplace and dehumanizing process, Puiu's film shows the sick old man and the strangers who deal with him to be all too human - extraordinarily so.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Suffers from several goofily tacky animated reenactments and a music score that unnecessarily underlines the significance of key events, but for those who lived through the turmoil of Vietnam, and for the generations that have come since, the film is an important document in its own right.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A meditation on a life lived in the public eye, I'm Still Here is strange, riveting, and occasionally appalling stuff, any way you look at it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A chase movie, a spy movie, a futuristic thriller full of colorfully bizarre characters and deftly choreographed stunt work, Children of Men works on multiple levels - as action and allegory.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Trainwreck is anything but.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Love Is Strange has a gentleness about it, and an empathy, that inspire.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    With the filmmaking techniques pared to the bone, it is left to the actors to bring the scenes alive - and they do, often brilliantly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Lady Vengeance is not for everyone. The violence, while less over-the-top and orgiastic than Park's two previous installments, is still hard and crackling. The sex is grim and graphic. And deadpan nihilism permeates the air.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Rivette's slow-moving but seamless study of the rituals of courtship has a disarming grace, even as its downcast hero, Depardieu's Gen. Armand de Montriveau, limps around stiffly.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    To be sure, there are goofy flourishes here, the in-jokey, left-field rummies that are the Brothers Coen's stock-in-trade. But this is altogether a quieter, more philosophical sort of endeavor.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Mountain Patrol is breathtakingly beautiful, breathtakingly brutal and simply breathtaking.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Ozon has crafted a near-perfect film, a mournful, moving kind of cinema poetry.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Rife with nightmarishly violent and horrific behavior. It's intense, graphic, frightening.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The film speaks to fundamental issues of history, truth, and the philosophical conflicts of humankind.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a tearjerker, sometimes, and sweetly funny at other moments. It's near perfect.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Boasts another formidable and fine-tuned performance from the great Charlotte Rampling.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Mr. Holmes is about how the past defines us. It is also very much about regret and trying to put things right.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Disarming, alarming, and more than a little impressive, Shults' movie was shot in his mother's Texas home, and the thing plays like a cross between Eugene O'Neill and a slasher pic. (It's cut like one; the soundtrack makes you feel jumpy like one.)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Late in Looper, when a highly telekinetic kid starts levitating things, it really does look like Christopher Nolan had wandered onto the set and taken over.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Fighter is funny, ferocious, sad, sweet, pulpy, and violent. Sometimes, all in the same minute.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Guadagnino, who directed Swinton in the 2009 Italian gem "I Am Love," has kept the core premise - and the sensuality - of Jacques Deray's original. (Delon and Schneider go skinny-dipping, too.)
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Although Me and You and Everyone We Know requires patience on the part of the viewer - to get past the faux naivete of its grown-up characters, to get past its deadpan arty tone - Miranda July's feature debut is worth the time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hugely affecting - and reflective and witty.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A loopy, surreal, beguiling collage of a film, the writer-director's meta-biopic embraces its subject.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Still Mine resonates in all the right ways.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hanna is a goofy and exhilarating mash-up of all sorts of things. Luc Besson's "The Professional" comes to mind, as do the propulsive synth-syncopations of "Run Lola Run" and the dark allegorical menace of Grimms fairy tales.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's not a very good title, Waste Land - this isn't a bleak film, at all - but just about everything else in Lucy Walker's documentary works, and illuminates.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Rush, which marks a return to form (and more so) for Howard after plodding through adultery buddy movie comedies (The Dilemma) and Dan Brown sequeldom (Angels & Demons), is almost primal.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Wadjda is a movie about freedom - and nothing represents freedom with the metaphoric simplicity and symmetry of a bicycle.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A breakneck French thriller, Point Blank is so ridiculously successful at keeping its momentum going - and keeping the audience tense with suspense - that it's likely to leave you with your heart pounding, gasping for breath.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The dialogue is smart, screwball, sublime.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Rife with dark humor, Little Otik presents a cautionary variation of the creation myth, and a warning that tampering with the natural order of things may not be such a wise idea.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Valérie Donzelli's Declaration of War deals with issues that may scare audiences away. Don't let it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A meditation on mortality, on loneliness, on the way technology and narcissism have intersected to create a fascinating monster, The Future is all of this and more. What Frank Capra would have made of it, who knows? But he would have liked its star.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Features entertainingly brainy musings from New York Times art critic Michael Kimmelman, and comments from child psychologists, friends and Marla collectors.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A deeply creepy and mysterious noir.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Whiplash is writer/director Damien Chazelle's hyperventilated nightmare about artistic struggle, artistic ambition. It's as much a horror movie as it is a keenly realized indie about jazz, about art, about what it takes to claim greatness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    An intriguing study of identity, marriage and, perhaps, madness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Even with a voice-over narration, and conversations with her dog, Robyn's nomadic quest is full of grand silences, all the better to take in the sky, the rocks, the world spinning underfoot. Wasikowska plays this wordless wanderer just right. That is, she makes her real.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The Killer Inside Me is tough, disturbing stuff: We're tagging along with a sociopath as he explains himself, reveals himself, works things out inside his head.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    This is a picture of quiet observation, contained emotion, the hush before the cathartic scream.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    It's a good thing not to know where a film is going - we need surprises, we need to be spun around a few times - and Ruby Sparks, which is about a writer and his muse, but then becomes more about the muse and her writer, is happily just such a film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A compelling existential tableau: sweating bodies, creaking mills turned by numbed oxen, people facing the daily and seasonal cycles of life with little hope of breaking free. Behind the Sun is forceful stuff.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    There's more tenderness in Big Eyes, and a playfully framed but nonetheless emphatic you-go-girl spirit to the proceedings, as we watch Margaret - a magnificent Adams - slowly emerge from her shell.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    From the street corner to the boardroom to the White House, the same paradigms are in play, Brown argues.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Funny stuff.

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