For 1,960 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Carol
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
1960 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Russian Dolls isn't quite the gem that its precursor was. It rambles. It's less of an ensemble effort. There's more of Xavier's moping self-centeredness. But Duris is terrific as the confused cusp-of-30 protagonist, and the rest of the cast is bright and beaming.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If Macbeth comes off at times like a Classics Illustrated comic-book adaptation (there is one, from 1955), it can also be quite moving, quite troubling, haunting, even.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This is no-nonsense, let's-get-to-it business, and will probably be less satisfying, and less clear, to viewers unfamiliar with the source material.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A taut, German-made thriller, Jerichow adds a bit of European xenophobia to the pulp traditions of passion and betrayal.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The To Do List is sex-obsessed, to be sure, but it's a chick flick, too. And in what it says about women (or girls) and men (or boys) and what they want, maybe it's a movie for us all.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a study in human behavior, describing how a self-confessed "emotional wreck," through accident and ambition, talent and temperament, became a star.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A goofy screwball romp that affords a gaggle of A-listers the chance to hambone around in antic style.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Violence ignites her passion, dividing her Belfast family.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A light and extremely likable comedy -- just what the doctor ordered right now.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    MacDowell brings an absolutely riveting conviction to her role. She's strong stuff in a movie that is likewise gripping and powerful.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Smartly acted, achingly simple love story.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Simple, sweet family fare, and a picture that extols the virtues of comradeship and community in a spunky, spirited fashion.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The performances are uniformly strong - nuanced, realistic, lacking any wild, flailing emoting.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Almost absurdly quiet and observant, The Limits of Control is about the space between the action, the steps along the way.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Road isn't a masterpiece...But I cannot think of another film this year that has stayed with me, its images of dread and fear - and yes, perhaps hope - kicking around like such a terrible dream.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Directed in steady fashion by Redford, The Company You Keep manages to keep its multiple strands of plot - and the people caught in them - from collapsing in a jumble of confusion. This alone, given the whirl of personal and political history going on, is an accomplishment.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Compelling, kinetic, fast and furious.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Luke, who had the title role in Denzel Washington's directorial debut, "Antwone Fisher," is that rare actor who can convey profound inner conflict with just a look in his eye; his performance is attuned, astute and remarkable.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Represents a brave undertaking on Jolie's part. It's impressively steady filmmaking for a first-timer, and a powerful, powerfully disturbing subject to take on.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There's an icy chill, a detachment, to A Dangerous Method, too. Of course, there are no talking cockroaches (Naked Lunch), no naked steambath knife fights (Eastern Promises), and that may have something to do with why this all feels so un-Cronenbergian.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This slight and amusing 'toon is mostly a trip designed for the kiddie crowd to take in.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If you just give yourself over to Nolan's sweeping, symphonic Cowled Crusader saga, The Dark Knight Rises is, well, a blast.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cold Mountain is the equivalent of comfort food: old-fashioned, earthy (lots of root vegetables), satisfying.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Yea or nay, love or hate, the portrait that Streep delivers in Phyllida Lloyd's impressionistic biopic is astonishing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Montenegro's character has a spark in her eye, and a determination, that makes this quiet, intelligent film anything but boring.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    When Dizdar hits, he hits big.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Suffice to say it's got plenty to do with corporate karma. And the word severance is more than just a double play on words - it's a triple whammy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The British star of "Ali G" fame plays Ricky Bobby's arch-nemesis. His name: Jean Girard. His provenance: France. His sponsor: Perrier. Speaking through a set of nasty-looking, tightly clenched teeth in the faux-est of faux French accents, Cohen is hilarious.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    McAvoy is charismatic, funny, and on the mark. Hall and Eve are both just right in their roles - bringing depth and detail to what could have been caricature parts. And if Starter for 10 takes a turn into foolhardy tragedy, it doesn't linger too long there.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's sick. It's stupid. But it also is undeniably adept at skewering social hypocrisy, lancing the boils of political self-righteousness, and poking fun where others fear to tread.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Aniston and Zahn are sweet together - their respective characters have built up psychic armor to keep the outside world at bay, and each breaks down the other's in revealing ways.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Simple, poignant and leavened with humor, it's a film that affirms the nourishing aspects of love and companionship.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The film, with its painterly juxtapositions of dockside industry, green hills, and cloud-scudded sky, is full of misguided motives and fairy-tale fraud. But it rings true at heart.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Miles Ahead is more a provocative character sketch than a meaty portrait, but it's a film that should be applauded for its daring, and for Cheadle's shape-shifting, soul-baring work.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At a certain point, Bujalski - the mumblecore meister, gleefully pushing the envelope of credulity here - jettisons the mock-doc pretense for a Christopher Guest-like glimpse into a strange subculture of the everyday.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Puccini for Beginners, which takes its title from its heroine's passion for opera, isn't just another trendy toe-dip in sexual experimentation. It may not be the real world of New York, or even of most relationships, but it's worth a visit.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What Our Fathers Did is a movie about historical and filial responsibility, about repudiation, about acceptance, about the pain we inherit, and the pain that continues to be doled out.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rea, with his hangdog looks and Jimmy Stewart line readings, spends a good deal of his time writhing in fake blood and broken shards - not what you'd call glamorous work, but he does it with conviction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The real reason to see Blank City is to catch snatches of the now-decades-old films - priceless DIY numbers that capture all the wild energy, humor, and rage of, if not a more innocent time, then certainly a cooler one.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Bridge to Terabithia the movie, like the book, is buckets-of-tears sad. Director Csupo and company manage to get that - the simple power of a story about kindred souls, about loss, about the limitless possibilities of a lively mind - just right.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Catching Fire is bigger, better and broodier than the first film.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There are good things to say about the inspirational Disney sports film McFarland, USA, starting with its up-from-the-scrap-heap story, which happens to be true.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Poignant, funny and clear-eyed about some tough topics: homophobia, racism, AIDS.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Hunt offers a powerful, provocative study of mob mentality and the fabric of trust.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There's something optimistic in the filmmaker's clear-eyed, straightforward storytelling style.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Black's caped "luchador" grows on you. Like a fun guy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kari's film, witty and sad, is a spare, small thing, but Noi has a poetry about it, and a poignancy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A thoroughly satisfying mix of mayhem and mindless fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In the psychologically scarred world of The Holy Land, sex and religion, love and hate, survival and despair all ricochet around, waiting to explode.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A disturbing and provocative study of adolescence and isolation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a noble enterprise, and a remarkable story, but it's not a movie that will set you free.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The vampires in What We Do in the Shadows are symbolic of something else altogether: epic unkemptness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Murphy, in the boogeyman role, toggles between seductive and sinister with enough conviction to make you forget that his character makes no sense at all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Whatever one makes of its subject's moral code and mind-set, one has to give Terror's Advocate its due: the stories are riveting, the man is real.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Several notches above the usual gay-themed indie, and mostly manages to avoid -- or at least legitimately deploy -- the gratuitous throbbing beefcake scenes that are part and parcel of the genre.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This quiet, aching film - punctuated by dead-on music choices, a blues song, reggae, the requisite Leonard Cohen - doesn't answer those questions. It's enough to raise them.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As scatalogical affairs go, Flushed Away shows remarkable buoyancy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There's humor in it, and sadness, and an acid-tinged humor that is miles away from the branded levity of "Friends." More power to Aniston for feeling the need to try something different, and then doing it -- well.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The line between ha-ha funny and sorrowful reverence has been crossed - more deftly than you'd think.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's giving nothing away to say that Munro makes it to Bonneville, and breaks the record - which apparently still stands - on his two-wheel contraption.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If The Golden Bowl -- isn't charged with electric emotion, well, that's not what Henry James or James Ivory is about.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's pretty formulaic stuff, and earns its R rating with profanity and unapologetically gratuitous female nudity, but somehow has a winning knuckleheaded charm.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With a thumping score and whirling cinematography, District 13: Ultimatum delivers two or three awesomely choreographed chase-and-fight-and-chase-and-fight-again sequences. The dialogue (in French, with subtitles) is not this movie's strength, nor should it be.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A surprisingly moving drama - a throwback to the small, character-driven indies of yesteryear.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The movie's combination of unabashedly fun carnage, cool special effects, and tongue-in-cheek dialogue keeps the ball rolling (albeit at reduced speed), until the last of the titular terrors has bit the dust.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pretty magical.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although The Secret in Their Eyes has neither the power, the artistry, nor the electric energy of its fellow Oscar nominee, France's "A Prophet," the Argentine film nonetheless engages with style, suspense, and seriousness of intent. Criminal intent and otherwise.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although there's nothing funny about addiction, Zahedi - a thin, bug-eyed fellow with the air of an R. Crumb sad sack - brings wit and self-deprecation to his tale of obsession and woe.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    21
    21 makes for some slick escapist fantasy. Even if, and because, the fantasy has its roots in something real.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    And that, in the end, is what Quartet is about: determined engagement, embracing music and theater and the arts, and embracing the friends and loved ones you have around you.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With creepy sound effects (thuds and clangs and groans, oh my) and a mounting - make that sinking - sense of dread, Black Sea is at once fist-clenchingly suspenseful and, well, dull.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deschanel does what she does seemingly without effort, managing to convey Summer's mixed-up messed-upness.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's smart, it's exhilarating, and Gilroy's depiction of a high-tech world where our every move is captured by surveillance cams and Big Brother-types deploying the latest spyware feels authentic, and troubling.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A story of entrepreneurship, of family, of fighting for one's rights - the right to make white lightning, and money. It's as American as apple pie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A surprisingly fine, fantastic movie it is.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Killer Joe is twisted pulp, and the actors chew on it bravely, boldly, and with varying degrees of success.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deadpan and a bit dopey, Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best has a shaggy charm, and the chemistry between the tuneful twosome's would-be Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty makes up for the inevitable rock-and-roll road movie cliches.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Burns' movie shows a Woody.esque affection for a certain slice of New York and its denizens (with the angst and neuroses quieted down a notch or two).
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For sheer audacity and adrenaline-fueled carnage, Shoot 'Em Up hits its target pretty much dead on.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Freakonomics is uneven, and even a little cloying, but its sum effect isn't bad.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Watermelon Woman is a thoughtful, charming movie that takes its audience along on a journey of self-discovery - without ever taking itself too seriously.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Offers a worshipful but insightful portrait of the group - centered, of course, on its charismatic front man.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Lacks the gimmicky hook that made "Run Lola Run" an arthouse hit, but it doesn't lack for ideas, nor for images that will sweep you up in their boldness and have the resonance of dreams.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Out-of-control hilarious.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A crazed symphony of the supernatural. The elements don't hang together, but Kasdan delivers real scares, and real hoots, in the midst of the mayhem and madness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Whether or not Ainouz's stylish directorial debut gets to the "real" Madame Satã is beside the point, but as a celebration of a figure who fashioned his own identity from pieces of pop culture and street poetry, from song and fashion and fury, it's memorable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Lee transforms a generic cops-crooks-and-hostages scenario into a smart, sharp heist movie by the sheer force of his love for, and knowledge of, the city where he lives.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    George Miller's Fury Road is a hundred things at once: a biker movie, a spaghetti western, a post-apocalyptic dystopian action pic, a tale of female empowerment (The Vagina Monologues' Eve Ensler was a consultant on set), a Bosch painting made scary 3D real, a Keystone Kops screwball romp, and an auto show from hell.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Tony Takitani, fablelike and beautiful, requires a certain amount of patience, but its small, peculiar charms work their way into your soul.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A wide-screen wildlife documentary in which the cycles of birth and death, migrations and seasons, are captured in stunning - absolutely stunning - ways.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Billy Bob Thornton, wearing a succession of toupees, wigs, fake facial hair, and funny hats, and twitching more than a horse's behind, is the best reason to see Bandits.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Deliberately paced, with an eerie, country-ish score from the Australian singer/songwriter Paul Kelly, Jindabyne is definitely a mystery. But it's not about who killed the woman - audiences know that practically from the outset.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As a piece of filmmaking, What the Bleep isn't exactly transcendent stuff. But as an entryway into new ways of thinking about the self, the universe, and the vast infinite whatnot of whatever (you know what we mean, oh wise one), this little movie is big.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Populaire plays like a musical - you expect anyone, at any time, to break into song.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mild but engaging romance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A conventional, button-pushing but emotionally affecting tale.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A satisfyingly screwy New York story.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At times soppy, sentimental and shamelessly romantic, at other moments bursting with clever barbs -- and now and then zooming in on something telling and poignant -- Love Actually is just about impossible to dislike.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Closer, in the end, lacks a certain heft. The language and the actions of the characters are brutal and devastating. The movie itself, a little too nice.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jurassic World, like its genomed nemesis, is bigger, and it is pretty scary. But it's not nearly as cool, or as smart, as "Jurassic Park."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Digging for Fire, like last year's "Happy Christmas" (also with Kendrick) and 2013's "Drinking Buddies" (with Johnson and Kendrick), is not a film for fans of taut, crafted dialogue and definitive endings. Conversations drift and weave, as do the people having them. Narcissistic melancholy dukes it out with beer-and-pot-stoked merriment. There is longing. There is foolhardiness.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With its icy symphonic score (courtesy of Iceland’s Johan Johansson) and a palette of rainy-day colors, Arrival is at once majestic and melancholy. It’s a grand endeavor, and Adams, at the center of it all, brings pluck and smarts and a deep-seated sorrow to her role. This is her movie, no doubt.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Bayona's moves are deft, the atmosphere oozes with anxiety and grief, but the big payoff - like the big payoff in The Sixth Sense, another film The Orphanage has more than a bit in common with - never comes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    While the characters are B-movie thin, the dialogue standard-issue, and the CG and matte effects only passable at best, it's undeniable fun to behold the likes of serious thespians Hawke and Dafoe slumming around in this cheeseball stuff.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Fans of Brooks and his wry, dry neuroticism will not be disappointed as he whines and whimpers around New Delhi.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A crowd-pleaser of immense proportions.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Hysteria is a romantic comedy, not an erotic one.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Sure, there are holes in The Manchurian Candidate, and tenuous coincidences and too-convenient plot devices. But Washington, Schreiber, Streep and company - and Demme - have managed to make all the malevolent machinations seem relevant again.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The real reason to see this slight but interesting documentary is to watch and listen to the radiant Aury.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If all this sounds like too much whimsy to bear, be forwarned. There is whimsy everywhere.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    One of those movies where it's impossible not to find yourself cheering for the scruffy underdog hero.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A chick movie? Well, yes, but it's a whole lot cooler than that one with the "Ya-Ya's" in the title.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Fast Food Nation picks up, and drops off, various members of its cast, sometimes without a satisfying resolution. But its final scenes, inside a real working meatpacking plant, on the killing floor, are brutally to the point.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    But the ending, at once ambiguous and obvious, is a letdown -- a frustratingly literal-minded, or literary-minded, conceit.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Morel and his crew certainly know how to stage action: the fight scenes and shootouts, the stairwell pursuits and motorway mayhem, are as good, if not better, than anything to come out of Hong Kong in a long time.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Quite literally the blockbuster of the year.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jolie's Maleficent is magnificent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Einsteinian, Kubrickian, Malickian, Steinbeckian - Interstellar, Christopher Nolan's epically ambitious space opera, is all that. And more. And, alas, less.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Push has a cool, sinewy style, energy to burn.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    They're not exactly Richard Linklater's "Before" trilogy, but French filmmaker Cédric Klapisch's "Spanish Apartment" movies - 2002's "L'Auberge Espagnole," 2005's "Russian Dolls," and now, Chinese Puzzle - have their devotees, too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Betrayal is at the heart of this story, but also dreams of liberty and a life where all people are treated with respect.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An edgy, disturbing drama.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A gloriously tacky horror movie with an inclination toward the occult, The Mother of Tears hails from the Italian schlockmeister Dario Argento, who photographs his Euro movie star daughter, Asia Argento, with something more than paternal pride.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Is Steve Jobs a great film? I don't think so. It's an achievement, certainly, full of Sorkin flourishes, breathtaking and brilliant one-liners that reveal a lot about the characters who deliver them.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Filmmaker Kormákur orchestrates all this with broad strokes and winking intrigue, although the line between hambone melodrama and irony-tinged satire gets walked across a few too many times.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kill Your Darlings is a tale of inspiration, then, but also a tale of jealousy, obsession, homophobia, and homicide. It's a whirlwind. Even if it doesn't all hang together, it's worth the ride.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This peripatetic farce practically propels itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Ripe with homoeroticism, but also with what the director — who made the film after recovering from a stroke a few years back — calls "the scent of murder."
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Sure, it's a skewed view through adolescent eyes, but it's one that still speaks to the aspirations, agendas, image-making and spin control behind a real, grown-up political election.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A weird fusion of blaxploitation and American indie, built on a template of old-style, follow-your-dream Hollywood drama. But it works - sometimes magnificently.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has a glorious good time satirizing the extravagant lengths to which the military and intelligence establishments will go if they think there's a payoff at the other end.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Director John Crowley trots his crew around London, working up a suitable amount of suspense. And paranoia.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Dedication works anyway, thanks to Theroux's jumping visuals and Crudup's jumpy performance.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Isn't exactly fraught with psychological depth and nuance, but as a stalker-stalkee suspenser, the pic has some nice things going for it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    With Sarandon in the title role, Scafaria has a winner: The actress tackles Marnie headlong, with heart and soul, trolling the fancy outdoor shopping mall for products to buy and for people to intercept and hang on to.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    How much is shaman and how much is showman is hard to tell. Some of Levitch's staccato soliloquies have the ring of truth, and some have the ring of jive. Either way, though, The Cruise is a journey worth taking. [27 Nov 1998, p.03]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    No walk in the park, Tyrannosaur is a character study steeped in the British (and Irish) tradition of social realism, and the experience of watching this skillfully made film is, well, exhausting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The pair are scrappy and smart and riff off each other like a no-budget, indie version of Tracy and Hepburn. It's impossible not to like them, and there's absolutely no reason not to.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rodriguez is riveting, with a drop-dead cynical charm.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although it's pretty much impossible to avoid the cliches and constructs of a war movie, Ayer pushes his actors to find the adrenalized fear, and fire, in their guts. Pitt brings "Wardaddy" alive in ways that put his cartoonish "Inglourious Basterds" Army lieutenant to shame. Lerman's rabbity dread is palpable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mostly, Not Fade Away is a hit.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Writing with her sister, Karen, Jill Sprecher rigs up an elaborate cause-and-effect comedy of errors, with Kinnear's predatory protagonist as both perp and victim. I won't say more than that, but Thin Ice is deeper than it first appears.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A muscular, no-nonsense genre pic (well, two genres: prisons and boxing), Undisputed isn't going to score points for originality, and the climactic bout is a bit of a letdown. But Rhames, as the cocksure millionaire pugilist, seethes brute force.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    One of the film's cleverest devices is a "Personality Diagnostic Checklist" that equates corporate "serial behaviors" - exploitation, deception, greed, lack of empathy and guilt - with the antisocial makeup of a certifiable psychopath.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    British screen stalwarts Bill Nighy and Imelda Staunton appear as locals - he twitchy and reticent, she chatty and full of cheer, both with their hearts in the right place.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A cartoon that's truly cinematic in scope, and a story that's compelling and heartfelt - even if the heart belongs to a big, four-legged herbivore.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Coolly crafted crime thriller.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Return of the King is too long...The various story lines...come together in stilted, episodic ways. The narrative is less-than-seamless.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Black Mass, a down and dirty crime drama based on the exploits of Boston gangster James "Whitey" Bulger, is thrilling for a number of reasons.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Moves along the way its leading man walks along - steady and sure.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rosenwald tells the remarkable story of a remarkable man.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Farrellys manage to have their cake and scarf it down, disgustingly, too.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This is more than the story of soldiers grappling with stress and doubt as they reenter the "normal" flow of domestic life. It's about strangers bonding, about friendship and discovery, about the comedy and tragedy of the human experience.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Gripping, sobering, inspiring stuff.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Lieberher, a Philly native transplanted to L.A., is a reed-thin, wide-eyed wonder. There's none of that precocious Hollywood child-actor stuff going on; he's seriously thinking about what he has to say, assessing his words and their implications. It's rare to see any actor - let alone a novice, barely out of the single digits - so readily and naturally displaying inner thought in front of the camera.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The music, of course, resonates. And so does this exquisite heartbreaker of a story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    McGregor, playing his lover, is a perfect foil: gentle, funny, magnetic.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has a cool, midcentury-modern look (dog and boy live in a populuxe Manhattan penthouse) and a voice cast that may not be A-list but fits the bill nicely.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Nicely filmed and acted.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A mopey meditation on family and its dysfunctions, Winter Passing is in fact of more than passing interest.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The picture uses humor and a heartfelt conviction to tell a story about discovering your destination in life.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A wickedly funny, Naked Gun-style parody that conflates old-style private-eye pics with Shaft and, yes, Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Despite the jumpy, ride-along camera work and the ever-present threat of engagement, a certain tedium sets in during the film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a farce with heart, a meditation on identity, family and gender politics that has real faith in its characters - even when the characters themselves lack it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All Good Things is a "true crime" drama with speculative scenarios and a kind of deliberately murky aura. It's a strange, thrilling tale begrimed by bad memories, by bad deeds.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    So gin-and-tonic dry, so deceptive in its deadpan-ness, that it's not always clear that Julian Fellowes is having fun. But he is.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It also boasts one of the funniest, loopiest Woody Harrelson turns in years.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Birth makes its oddball supernaturalism seem completely, compellingly real.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Jessica Biel is Vera Miles, the star who had the nerve to get pregnant when Hitchcock wanted her for "Vertigo." He feels betrayed, and she feels relieved, consigned to a supporting role in Psycho as Marion's sister. And Toni Collette, in glasses and a dark wig, is Hitchcock's long-suffering secretary, Peggy. Both Biel and Collette are very good, engaging.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Gritty, suspenseful and almost poetic in its depiction of an unforgiving town, A Most Violent Year is just shy of being great.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Bronze, for all its crudeness and lewdness (Melissa Raunch, anyone?) and wonky comedy, is actually a good old-fashioned tale of redemption.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A charmer.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Like Sorkin's D.C.-set TV series, "West Wing," his script for Charlie Wilson's War is full of rapid-fire badinage, with movers and shakers moving smart and shaking snappy as a squad of aides trot along behind, briefcases and coffee cups in tow. A decade - not to mention a war - never went by so quickly.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What's not to like?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At its heart, there's Blanchett, an actress whose instincts are unerring, and dead-on.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Ambiguous in a satisfying, puzzling sort of way, November offers a triptych of scenarios revolving around a grim moment.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's the lysergic soap opera going on among Kesey, Neal Cassady, and various pals, scribes, spouses, and hangers-on piled onto the rainbow-hued school bus that's at the heart of this rollicking road pic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Taut entertainment that juggles brainy ideas about perception, predetermination and free will - and drops things in a messy third act where the vintage noir gets bathed in a bit too much Spielbergian glow.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    You get faux feelings -- but faux of the highest, giddiest order.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's totally down-to-earth, as real as a trip to the supermarket.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Engaging, though certainly not groundbreaking, I Went Down manages to quote from Plato and deploy a cheap joke about masturbation (twice). As gangster movies go, it's a charmer. [3 July 1998, p.3]
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If Edel's Oscar-nominated film drags in its final 40 minutes, it's a function of the director's fidelity to the facts - and the fact that the founding trio (and the film's stars) have become prisoners of the state, confined and confused.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A heartfelt project, scrappy and engaging, The Way has its way with audiences despite, not because of, its sentimental excess.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A charmingly off-the-wall little tale. Black doesn't do anything he hasn't done before (in fact, he's already done his remake of King Kong!).
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Scott's reimagining of the legend of Robin Hood has more heft than it does humor, more soulful brooding than snappy thrust-and-parry retorts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Rize shows how clowning led to krumping, and argues that its practitioners' fierce dedication to dance has saved countless kids from drugs, crime and gangs.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There are laughs here aplenty, and sexy, goofy, off-the-cuff charm.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Saving Mr. Banks, set in 1961, is smart, delightful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Laceratingly funny Hollywood comedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The mostly British ensemble can do this stuff in their sleep, but Macfadyen and Donovan and Graves, especially, work up the necessary antic angst and silliness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cooper, who steered Jeff Bridges through his Oscar-winning turn in Crazy Heart, gets fiercely committed performances from just about everyone in Out of the Furnace.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    McCarthy, Wiig, McKinnon, and Jones bring a spirit of spontaneity to their interactions; it's not exactly seat-of-the-pants improv, but it doesn't feel blocked-out and belabored, either.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Apart from its anthropomorphic, allegorical angle, Zootopia is also a tale of female empowerment and a classic noir, too.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Somehow, this rollicking day in the life of a band of skateboarding Latino punk-rockers doesn't exude the voyeuristic smarm of previous Clark forays.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A handsomely staged and craftily constructed tearjerker.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    If we now take a woman's right to vote and to hold public office for granted, Suffragette reminds us that it wasn't that long ago when things were different.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Throw in some business with the CIA, add a small army of Serbian thugs and a mysterious Croatian beauty, and The Hunting Party picks up speed, careening through the forests where the Fox may or may not be hiding out. Whatever fate awaits, it can't be good. But it can be fun.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Has an odd magic about it - the magic of Darger's singularly peculiar dreamworld.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Chamber of Secrets -- darker, scarier and somewhat better than "Sorcerer's Stone."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Aimed at tweenage girls and mushy romantics of all age and stripe, Penelope has a quick gait and a nice comic tone.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A wild, wacky, wide-screen reimagining of the vintage radio serial and TV series, the film - with Armie Hammer in the hat and mask, galloping across Texas righting wrongs, and Depp as his trusty Indian sidekick, Tonto - is an epic good time.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An effectively unsettling mix of Southern gothic and Old Testament hugger-mugger, with shades of "The Exorcist" and even "Rosemary's Baby" thrown in.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's the cars, and the mega-horsepowered action, that matter most. With its driver-POV spinouts, wrong-way chases, and multilane median jumps, the movie is a roaring revel of an automotive fantasy.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Still stands as a gloriously silly and twisted send-up.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    No great shakes, The Baxter nonetheless has a quiet loopiness going for it. And it has the absence of a laugh track going for it, too.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a good story, a sad story, a story of triumph and prejudice and terrible hypocrisy. And Cumberbatch aces it all - another smartly realized but deeply soulful performance from an actor who seemingly can do no wrong.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    No manner of bizarre distraction can keep Anchorman's hapless hero from his mission: "I'm going to do what God put Ron Burgundy on this earth to do," he declares. "Have salon-quality hair and read the news!"
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    "Rebel Without a Cause" with a debate club, Better Luck Tomorrow is a sharp, smart slice of suburban angst among the high school overachiever set.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    May not be great cinema, but it nonetheless deserves attention.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Baumbach, whose films include the searingly funny, autobiographical "The Squid and the Whale" and the brilliantly uncomfortable "Margot at the Wedding," writes wry, sharp, poignant stuff.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Like "Tremors," only ickier, Slither is a tongue-in-cheek horror flick that skewers the genre while delivering seat-squirming scares.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Foxx makes what he does look effortless. He's the reason to see Collateral, as he walks into the frame and walks off with the picture.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Effie Gray is peculiarly compelling, even if the issue of sexual repression, all the Victorian manners, seem light-years gone and close to unfathomable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All about the wacky borderlands where reality and invention intersect. But there are no safe demarcations -- no demilitarized zone, no Berlin Wall -- to cue us to which side we're operating in, or that Barris is operating in.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Both the leads are scarily good, and Ozon imbues his troubling tale with jarring blasts of light and the sun-dappled beauty of the natural world.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The film - despite being a half-hour too long - is a rocking, rolling supernatural spectacle.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The transformation of Reynold's lawyer from a bumbler and stumbler to a victorious litigator, sticking it to an entire nation, is the stuff of a Frank Capra/Jimmy Stewart pic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Fever Pitch works. At times, it works brilliantly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It is a fever dream of a movie, tracking its subject as she tries to maintain control, maintain her composure and her sanity, and as she tries — shellshocked, quaking with grief, but also fiercely determined — to shape and secure her husband’s legacy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a tale of survival and kitsch that will win you over.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    My Best Friend, not surprisingly, is about what it means to have friends - and not to have them, to be alone. It's about connection, about trust and vulnerability. That Leconte's little film is a mild-mannered farce, makes the heartache funny, but really, this is serious stuff.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    As funny as it is sick (and it's plenty of both).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Delightfully creepy suspenser.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's human drama, high and mighty.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Manages to pull off a couple of startling surprises.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Slower and talkier than the five Potters that came before - but not necessarily in a bad way - Half-Blood Prince is a bubbling cauldron of hormonal angst, rife with romance and heartbreak, jealousy and longing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's one of the great have-your-cake-and-eat-it-too performances of the year.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Director Jennifer Yuh Nelson, who oversaw the elegant title sequences from the first film, likewise gives Kung Fu Panda 2's series of flashbacks a different look, harking back to Chinese shadow puppetry and delicate watercolors. With its mix of vibrant CG and classical elements, the movie dazzles.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Don Jon is about a man's unwitting search for intimacy, for real connection in a world where everyone is connected - by social media, by the Internet, by TV and computer and smartphone screens. That's not exactly an original idea. But Gordon-Levitt goes at it with gusto, and style. Give the guy some props.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Skyfall is certainly the most cultured Bond film to come along in some time. It's also the first of the three Craig endeavors to seriously (and wittily) acknowledge its pedigree.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Let the Fire Burn does not glorify MOVE. What it does do is force us to consider why and how this surreal event - a city bombing its own citizens, leaving innocent children dead - occurred. And ask, could something like it ever happen again?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mixes the intimate, indie vibe of "Daytrippers" with the absurdist screwball streak of "Superbad," to winning effect.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Some tacky animated sequences notwithstanding, Youth in Revolt is smart, cool and frequently hysterical.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Cartel does what good reporters are supposed to do: follow the money.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The Next Three Days is genre fare - no pretensions, no nonsense.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Blending facts, anecdotes, and no little conjecture, Elvis & Nixon finally finds the two American icons face to face, sharing M&M's and Dr Peppers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cusack is especially good in a role that's got more (and less) going on under the surface, while Peet offers up another coltish, trash-mouthed vamp.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Scary Movie 3 is a veritable time capsule of of-this-moment kitsch, schlock and bad taste. And it's funny, too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Loose, eminently likable stuff.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Casey's big brother has made a tough, taut mystery.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    At a certain point, The Homesman will take you by surprise. By the end, a ferry ride across the Missouri River, it will take your heart.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The effectively creepy Stir of Echoes, is enough to make your blood chill.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Beefed up and twanging like a true cowboy, Cooper nonetheless carries the full weight of his character's achievements - and the questions that come with them - as he tries to find his footing back on Texas soil. If American Sniper fails at being a truly great film, it is no fault of its star.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    JCVD juggles humor with whomping martial-arts moves and a kind of melancholy star turn from the melancholy, muscular star.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A satisfyingly moody, melancholy, madcap live-action romp.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Theron proves the master of operatic hissy fits, Blunt lets the pain show beneath the glacial cool, Chastain brings her usual Juilliard-schooled commitment to the occasion, and Hemsworth is Hemsworthian, if oft-times incomprehensible, delivering his lines in a gorse-y whorl of vowels and consonants.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a wise and endearing little film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In a sense, Everyone Else traces, over a stretch of days on the sunny Mediterranean, the whole trajectory of a relationship. It's a marriage in miniature: courtship, consummation, conflict; love and hate; the longing for freedom vs. the need for companionship.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A deft, affecting drama about childhood sexual abuse and its lifelong scars.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Winner of a prize at the Cannes Film Festival in May, the quiet, solemn Climates is a bit like those towering ancient columns that Isa photographs to show his class. The fragmented architecture is beautiful and striking, but also extremely dated.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The plain, reportorial style of Lost Boys -- which simply records its subjects in various settings and situations -- results in a film that doesn't preach, doesn't politicize.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The music is symphonic, the cinematography spectacular, the narration — ay, there's the rub. In Oceans, the latest Disney nature documentary, the voice-over almost manages to turn the majestic into the mundane. Almost.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Frost/Nixon is not the epic gladiatorial face-off, the ricocheting verbal shoot-out that writer Morgan and filmmaker Howard imagined.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Che
    What this slow-moving but fascinating two-part portrait does do is hunker down in the jungles and mountains of Cuba and (in the second part) Bolivia, capturing in keen, almost Zen-like detail the trudging and trekking, the recruiting and strategizing, the fighting and the philosophizing.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The title Brooklyn's Finest is drowning in irony, of course, but Fuqua's moves are less obvious: His film is classical and gritty, his violence makes you want to duck and run.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Engagingly odd and full of sad, funny moments.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kinnear does what he's done in the past: You underestimate the guy's acting chops, and suddenly, strikingly, he floors you.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Monster brings the horror stories of everyday life down to a recognizable level -- even as the actress inhabiting that story remains startlingly unrecognizable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Undefeated is undeniably inspirational stuff.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's not just the grainy stock and bad sound - technically, we've come a long way. It's the cheesy sex, the awkward edits, the hammy symbolism, the mix of art-house aesthetics and exploitation cliché. Strange creature, this is.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The filmmaker, whose career took off with a very different sort of Holocaust film, 1990's Oscar-nominated "Europa Europa," understands that most of these stories arrive at a point of unspeakable, incomprehensible horror.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Johnny Depp, who portrayed Thompson's alter-ego in Gilliam's film, provides the narration. If there's hagiography here, it's counterbalanced by biographical truth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In short, This Is 40, in tried and true Apatowian style, mixes weighty issues about intimacy and cohabitation with astute and smart-alecky pop culture references, crude bathroom jokes, stoner riffs, boob ogling, and existential angst.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    An unflashy but fascinating meditation on addiction and greed. The junkie was clearly Mahowny, but the greed, in a way, was everybody else's: the bankers', their flush clientele's, and the casinos', all busy feeding his habit.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Cartel Land offers a chilling glimpse into a world of violence and vigilantism.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A lot of dark, Orwellian fun.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Pinpointing the era - lovingly - is very much what Dark Shadows' has on its mind. While there's a tangle of romance and vengeance and all sorts of family matters to deal with, Burton's film is really about hippies in bell-bottoms, stoned out in their VW micro-buses.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    All nutty, all nonsensical, all aboard.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's not as good, nor as complex, as "The Lost Boys," but that doesn't make the story of mass annihilation, sprawling refugee camps, the generosity of Americans, and the resilience of a handful of Sudanese survivors any less worthy of telling - again.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a wondrous mix of the momentous and mundane, the profound and the perverse, with Cave blues-talking his way through the goofy juxtapositions, the darkness, and the light.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Mommy is too long for its own good, its sense of hysteria too relentless. But the headlong energy is intoxicating more than exhausting, and Freud would have a field day with Die and Steve. A mother and child, so sweet, so tender, so terrifying.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    There'd be a lot less strife and starvation, disease and dread, if Nancy Meyers ruled the world.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A wonderfully crafted, smartly acted study of a complex old coot.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In Bruges, at its best, works like "Pulp Fiction" with Irish (and Belgian) accents, digressing into weird discourse and giving a bunch of actors the occasion to shine in small, peculiar roles.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This gory horror romp is a goofball medley of "Dawn of the Dead," "28 Days Later" . . . , and Monty Python-style severed-limbs/blood-spurting sicko comedy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Amusing, compelling and technologically fascinating tale.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Before Trollhunter is done with, the truth about these fairy-tale creatures - they gnaw on trees and truck tires, can be turned to stone by exposure to light, and have something against people who believe in Christ - is revealed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In the end (and it's a happy end, to be sure), Catch Me if You Can is as crisp and trim as a new suit. Well, a new old suit - say, circa the 1960s.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    For all its flaws, offers an enjoyable look at the machinations of moviedom and fame, and a look into a future where what is real and what isn't becomes scarily blurred.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The real-life career criminal Jacques Mesrine is seen in all his wild, scary, violent glory.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In much the same way that the smash "Zootopia" demonstrated that creatures of different culture and class and species are better off when they come together, The Secret Life of Pets is a testament to teamwork and friendship and fixing the rifts that divide us. Let the fur - and the warm, fuzzy feelings - fly.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Too long (and it sure ain't taut), but it brims with passion.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Beauty in Trouble offers a meditation on the legacies of communism and the lure of capitalism, but also on the human need for love, connection and family.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Whether or not the story makes any sense, The Promise promises to transport - and does.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A taut thriller about an American family touching down in an unnamed country just as a violent coup erupts, No Escape goes about its gut-churning business by playing (and preying) on our worst xenophobic tendencies.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This modest drama is the art-house equivalent of comfort food: satisfying in its familiarity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    That's something else Ridley and his actors do: make you appreciate what a life it was - impossibly short, impossibly brilliant.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    In key ways, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is like Guillermo del Toro's "Pan's Labyrinth": a child, caught in the waking nightmare of one of history's ugliest times, confronting the horrors of a grown-up world, and dealing with them as best he, or she, can.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Joe
    This world feels studied in its "authenticity": the rusted GMC pickup, the tumbledown shack, the boozy brothel, and angry Joe Ransom guttin' deer and tending to his own gunshot wounds with a grimace and a bottle of alcohol.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Yes
    Potter explores midlife ennui, (middle-)East-West tension, theology, biology and the irrational nature of romance in this ambitious, if ultimately sketchy, drama.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Although Mal is ostensibly the movie's hero, and River its heroine, Whedon does a good job of giving all onboard their own story arc, their tragedies and triumphs. The cast, to a man (and woman), is solid, although it's the ballet-trained Glau, who gets to mope in high angst and go Zhang Ziyi-crazy in a couple of martial-arts scenes, who steals the show.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Without editorializing, Mermin raises fascinating questions about the cultural impact of globalization, the allure of the West, and the troubled history of an ancient land.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Kiss of the Dragon is a straight-ahead star vehicle for the trim and terse Li, whose steady gaze and fist-flying ways are tempered by a gentlemanly mien.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    What about the kids and families who have no connection to Méliès, little familiarity with Charlie Chaplin or Buster Keaton? Will Hugo keep them in their seats? I'm not sure.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    A deadpan, dead-on comedy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Watts, who is one of the film's executive producers, brings a taut intelligence to the proceedings, but her character, like Roth's, is more archetype than actual person.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    The film's conceit - mopey strangers meet, form a band, and take to the dance halls - has a Judy Garland/Mickey Rooney let's-put-on-a-show innocence, and exuberance.

Top Trailers