For 1,719 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 73% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Rea's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Sunshine
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
1,719 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Baker's life, like his music, was as sad as it was beautiful. And Weber's movie - obsessed with Baker's image as much as with his songs - hits all the right notes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Offers a sometimes lyrical, sometimes gut-turning portrait of war seen through the eyes of children.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Both a concert film and a more intimate thing: a fascinating, fly-on-the-wall (or fly-in-the-dining-car) glimpse of some clearly blotto rock legends talking, singing, hanging out. The fact that a good number of them are now dead makes it doubly memorable.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Even if you get lost - in the spyspeak, in the codes, in the comings and goings of grim-faced men with satchels full of documents they should not have - Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is worth getting lost in.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    It's a performance that will make you cringe - with despair, with empathy - as Gosling's Dan takes one self-destructive step after another.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A gorgeous operatic tale of obsession and madness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Whether or not Street Fight wins the Academy Award Sunday night, Curry's picture is must-see fare for any and every observer of the curious world of American politics.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    A quiet, heart-rending masterpiece, one with an actor's turn that people will remember, and rediscover, eons into the future.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    This drag-queen melodrama, like its star, perseveres.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Take Shelter, which, it should be said, boasts haunting but seamless visual effects, is a movie for this moment in time, this moment in our lives.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Hopped-up and electrifying. The soundtrack is wall-to-wall and propulsive.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Alexandra never depicts the soldiers in combat, but Sokurov nonetheless shows how war can break down the social structure, break down family, break the human soul.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A wonderful, witty mix of horror and social satire, The Host takes its simple, time-tested premise - menacing creature terrorizes the populace - and runs with it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Still, somehow, The Tree of Life - impressionistic, revelatory, elliptical - works.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    I wanted to like Meek's Cutoff more than I did. Reichardt and her writer, Jonathan Raymond, bring a quiet, watchful sensibility to their work, allowing the actors room to reflect and riff. But the stilted language and rectitude of the times don't always mesh with the acting.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    It shows us the everyday pressures and problems, the joys and pleasures, experienced by someone moving through life. And then that BART train pulls into Fruitvale, and the rest is history.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Quiet, rageful indictment of a two-tiered Islamic society.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    At turns funny, sweet, sad, trenchant and telling. It's a gem.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Roiling with laughter, tears, drunken confessions, revelatory soliloquies, pain, sorrow, hospital visits, and various kinds of love, A Christmas Tale is a smart, sprawling, and sublimely entertaining feast.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    Quite simply, a revelation.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Ann Savage, the femme fatale from a slew of old Hollywood noirs, is savagely funny as Maddin's beauty-parlor proprietress mom.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A chase movie, a spy movie, a futuristic thriller full of colorfully bizarre characters and deftly choreographed stunt work, Children of Men works on multiple levels - as action and allegory.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A slow-burning, character-rich study in desperation, grief, vengeance, loyalty, and love. It's the sort of arthouse entry - in German, mostly - that gets you thinking about an English-language remake.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    A dour-faced but sublime comedy about the kindness of strangers -- and about the strangeness of people who find themselves in oddball moments of grace.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    The usual complaints and caveats about Anderson - he's precious, his characters have no grounding in the real world - can be made about Moonrise Kingdom, but so what? This is his seventh feature, he has been working with a gang of collaborators in front of the camera and behind, and his worldview gets richer, and more revealing, even as the view from his lens gets smaller, closer, almost two-dimensional in its oddball tableaux.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Rea
    Steeped in quiet despair, Lantana is a psychological thriller that emphasizes the psychology over the thrills. It's a smart, heart-twisting picture.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    The rare movie that manages to convey the inner soul of an artist.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Steven Rea
    The movie is, start to finish, candy-colored angst.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Quietly and keenly observed, Summer Hours nods to Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard" (a country estate, a family reunion, an impending sale). Assayas displays a lucid sense of how personal history and family identity are inextricably linked to a physical place - here, to a house that is still busy accumulating its memories.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Rea
    Late in Looper, when a highly telekinetic kid starts levitating things, it really does look like Christopher Nolan had wandered onto the set and taken over.