For 245 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tim Robey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Forbidden Room
Lowest review score: 20 The Last Exorcism Part II
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 82 out of 245
  2. Negative: 18 out of 245
245 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    Where we might have expected a gentle or rueful coda, we get a battle of the sexes as blistering as the best of Tracy/Hepburn, and infinitely more frank.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    If films were gestures, this one would be a perfectly timed shrug, with the smile to match.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    Elicits from McQueen a directing job that's compellingly humble but also majestic, because his radical showmanship is turned to such precise, human purposes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    The movie is hauntingly romantic at heart, in the best spirit of a Gothic fairytale, but without the harsh shadows or hard edges.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s really a radical experiment in non-fiction cinema – not seeking to enlighten or inform, but to disorientate us, practically to drown us, in a nightmare vision of the ocean’s power.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s wonderful.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s a stunningly confident piece of filmmaking, which holds on to vital clues about how much time has elapsed, and what’s happened, then springs them on us. The performances slay you.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    Despite borrowing cleverly from the best, It Follows still manages to feel like no other example in recent years - tender, remarkably ingenious and scalp-pricklingly scary.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s beautifully organised, and there’s no way you could possibly watch it without learning all kinds of stuff.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s extremely moving in the gentlest, most linear way, and the other performances are sterling, too.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    David Oyelowo has never given a better performance. He seems to penetrate into King’s soul and camps out there for two hours. He’s tremendous, of course, when electrifying his congregation at the podium, but a sense of fatigue is even more paramount.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It tests our presumptions, makes us squirm.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    This story is about whether secrets can be survived, whether the knowing or not knowing is more injurious. Haigh’s very fine, classically modulated film keeps these questions alive until literally its last shot, and lets them jangle their way through you for days afterwards.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    Carol is gorgeous, gently groundbreaking, and might be the saddest thing you’ll ever see. More than hugely accomplished cinema, it’s an exquisite work of American art, rippling with a very specific mid-century melancholy, understanding love as the riskiest but most necessary gamble in anyone’s experience.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    The network of links he builds, and the film’s ever-deepening empathy for those whose search can’t be satisfied, are persuasive enough to banish doubt, leaving you humbled, shocked and moved.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    In emulating the two-strip Technicolor process, it creates a look that’s scratchy and primitive, but also, through the peculiar alchemy of Maddin’s craft, eerily rich and dreamlike, with the depth of an oceanic abyss.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    It’s flat-out hilarious – find me a funnier screen stab at Austen, and I’m tempted to offer your money back personally. Gliding through its compact 92 minutes with alert photography and not a single scene wasted, it’s also Stillman on the form of his life.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    You could also argue that this almost intentionally exhausting film is too much of a good thing. But there’s amazingly little of it you'd want to live without.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Robey
    How Jarmusch takes this match-stick house of nothings and fills it with such calm and wisdom is a mystery with only one real answer: he’s an artist.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    An acutely compassionate account of unshakeable guilt.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    On his broadest canvas yet, Trapero mounts a saga about the role of conscience, which might seem old-fashioned if it weren’t so urgently imagined. An added fillip is Michael Nyman’s stirring score, his best in years.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    A dizzying collage of all the changes in London’s social and architectural fabric since light was first trained through celluloid.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    You’ve never seen a documentary like The Act of Killing. If you saw too many like it, your hold on sanity might fray, which is not so much the film’s fault as that of its bloodcurdling subject. This movie is essential.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    Call it a landlocked variant on Robinson Crusoe, but it’s a hypnotic one, with a sense of mystery and interior life that are all its own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    There are no shattering revelations here – if Gibney’s canny gathering of various narratives, shimmering score and cool graphics give his film the goose-pimply intrigue of a spy thriller, it just happens to be one you’ve already seen. It’s also one in which the subplot, if anything, takes over from the main plot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    A good cop/bad cop action comedy with the funniest two-women-above-the-title pairing in memory.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    A vastly enjoyable theatrical banquet, if perhaps not a profound one, is served up in a bit of a rush here, as if they can't wait to get the next sitting in. But you certainly don't come away feeling hungry.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Robey
    At just under two hours, it's a little long, but the blend of biting character study and campaigning pharmaceutical docudrama is zesty and memorable.

Top Trailers