For 2,240 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ty Burr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Frankenweenie
Lowest review score: 0 Gigli
Score distribution:
2240 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    In many ways, Son of Rambow plays like a pint-size, even cheekier version of the recent Michel Gondry film "Be Kind Rewind." Both are stories about people making movies not because it's their job but because doing so brings a vast sense of play into their lives.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The performances are uniformly excellent, but pride of place goes to Bennett’s Sir James, an upper class twit of Pythonesque proportions. Rarely has a character this moronic been this happy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A straight-up drama and thus the only film in "The Trilogy" not forced into a genre straitjacket -- suspense thriller ("On the Run") or farce ("An Amazing Couple") -- "Life" is also the finest of the three. This isn't a coincidence.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Low-budget, sure of itself, and creepy as hell, the film actually scores quite low on the gore meter. Like the best nightmares, though, it proves nearly impossible to shake.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    "No God and no religion can survive ridicule," wrote Mark Twain, but for once the sage of Hannibal was wrong.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Ida
    The first three-quarters of Ida are as astonishing as anything you’ll see at the movies this year.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Abrams understands what George Lucas never quite figured out: that we’re less interested in the science fiction future than we are in revisiting the past. We don’t really want to see what happens next in that galaxy far, far away. We want to recapture what it felt like the first time we arrived, in 1977, with a movie called “Star Wars.” We want to go home. Star Wars: The Force Awakens takes us there.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Sloppily made at times and it comes close to wearing out its welcome, but you can't blame Walker for not wanting to let his subjects go. And as the movie progresses, a viewer begins to understand why: These people are literally singing for their lives.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    An engaged, engaging voyage of (re)discovery that’s too in love with its subject to qualify as food porn. It’s food romance.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Director Steven Soderbergh is working very near the top of his game here, and if Magic Mike tells an old, old story about a young man, his talent, his rise, and his fall - see everything from "Saturday Night Fever" to "Boogie Nights" - he brings the confidence of a born filmmaker and a cast that's sharper than their characters and ready to play.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Very few people will take in this spectacle of a society amusing itself to death, of “reality games” and the vapid media hysteria that surrounds them, and not draw a parallel to our own televised bread and circuses. At its best, “Catching Fire” is a blockbuster that bites the culture that made it.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A cruelly precise, often bleakly comic account of upper-middle-class privilege coming unglued when the cosmos throws a curveball.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    This is the first time, though, his (Mortensen)performance seemed so much bigger than the film surrounding it. That he manages the feat with so few wasted gestures puts him in line with the greats.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Flattens you with concussive detail and the awfulness of war; it plays like "Saving Private Ryan" as remade by a Continental mathematician flipping out on Ecstasy.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    It’s a gentle epic, based on a 10th-century Japanese folk tale, that uses pencils, ink, and impressionistic washes of color to convey a glowing visual otherworld, one that stands in contrast both to Takahata’s earlier work and the hard-edged lines and bright tones of much anime.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The attitude of many “UP” fans hovers between voyeurism and concern, between cherishing these people as distant friends and as extensions of ourselves. They’re canaries in the coal mine of human existence.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Turns out to be a grade-A B-movie that grounds its thrills in particulars of time, place, and character, so that when the time comes to make the leap into the wholly preposterous, we do so willingly. This is a movie that earns our trust -- and then happily abuses it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    What on earth is The Trip, besides hugely enjoyable?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    With a minimum of melodrama and a fluid camera style that weaves restlessly in and out of the throng, Something in the Air is attentive to the users and the used in this generation of supposed equals. There’s no anger to the film, though, and what sometimes feels like passivity is really just the fond, unromantic gaze of an artist carefully considering his younger self.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Deeper, darker currents move through Momma's Man, eddying around fears of letting go on both sides of the generational divide.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    May not be the best movie ever made about the perils of family life, but it is among the most ruthlessly comic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Quiet, observant, and intensely moving whenever Heiskanen is on screen, and it has a valedictory sweep that feels like a summing up.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Terrifically compelling and, more than that, unexpectedly moving.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The Perks of Being a Wallflower finds an unexpectedly moving freshness in the old clichés by remaining attentive to the nuances of what happens within and between unhappy teenagers.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A haunting experience, one that requires patience (and then some) but that offers spiritual, philosophical, and aesthetic rewards beyond the immediate power of words to describe.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Haneke has become known as a dour modern master of cinematic pain, and in this movie he scrubs civilization down to the root level.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Seems calculated to shock, but what’s most disquieting about Nymph()maniac is how funny, tender, thoughtful, and truthful it is, even as it pushes into genuinely seamy aspects of onscreen sexuality. Obnoxious he may be, but von Trier knows how to burrow into our ids.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Gosling may be the soul of Half Nelson, but Epps is the film's heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The question remains: Why would Herzog want to dramatize what he has already captured as nonfiction? To better control the material, I think, and to bring it in line with his own obsessions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The movie’s tone is hushed, restrained; emotional damage is crammed way back where no one can see it yet defines everything through a murky prism.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The film is at its most quietly powerful, though, when telling the story of a group of African-American high school kids who took their discontent to the highest court in the land.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The Martian really, truly works — not as art, necessarily, but as the sort of epic, intelligent entertainment the mainstream film industry has supposedly forgotten how to craft. All that, and the movie’s a valentine to creative collaboration as well as an example of it. It’s enough to make you almost grateful.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The idea that there may be life after war and murder, even for the murderers, and what that might look like — what burdens you might be allowed to put down and what you’ll carry forward forever. The movie’s too wise, and too weary, to have a moral beyond that.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The subject is the privileged state of childhood itself - how we're all lucky to have had it and how it so easily floats away from our grasp.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    That smart, hip, human comedy you've been waiting for all year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The Lunchbox isn’t an example of bravura moviemaking or cutting-edge style but simply a tale told with intelligence, restraint, and respect.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    It’s the classic modern dynamic of lefty parent and tightly-wound yuppie spawn, but Toni Erdmann takes it out of sitcom territory and into something longer, richer, weirder, and ultimately a great deal more affecting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Horror movie Rule #1: The only way to kill a zombie is to shoot it in the brain. George Romero himself laid this maxim down with his first film, the endlessly influential 1968 gutter classic "Night of the Living Dead." Forty years later, with George A. Romero's Diary of the Dead, the venerable filmmaker has done something almost as startling: He has put brains back into the zombie genre.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A tremendous human drama, with each stage of its characters' journey a white-knuckle thriller in miniature.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    She’s a diva — she knows it, we know it, the director knows it — but over the years Stritch seems to have learned that the only way to deal with that is honestly. So she’s a paradox: a diva with no illusions about herself.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    There's a quiet metaphor here: How do you teach children without touching them - their minds, their souls, their sensitivities?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    In Standard Operating Procedure, Errol Morris does something inconceivable and, at first glance, ill-advised. He gives the US soldiers of Abu Ghraib back their humanity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The real deal, an often awkward but nonetheless terrifically compelling high-stakes human drama.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Reprise is exceptionally smart about the crushing expectations brought to the table by those who love us.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The triumph of this fond, uncontainable documentary is that it lets you hear that voice again loud and clear.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The movie's strength is its refusal to offer easy answers.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Tarantino may have nicked the title first, but this is the real ''Pulp Fiction," with all the drama and the dead ends that implies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Rich Hill might fairly be called “Boyhood: The Documentary,” and, not surprisingly, it offers a reality harsher than — if just as compassionate as — Richard Linklater’s dreamy time-lapse drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Land Ho! is a hot spring of a movie: It fizzes a lot, and you come out feeling better than you went in.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The filmmakers are smart to cut between their primary interview and later footage of Junge watching that interview and offering further commentary -- living footnotes, as it were.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Does what too many independent American movies only pretend to do: Takes you to an unnoticed corner of our country and shows what it's like to actually live there.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The strength of Kopple’s film (as opposed to the strength of Sharon Jones, which is mighty) is that it honestly depicts the vulnerabilities of an indomitable woman.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Stories We Tell is one of those movies you watch on a screen and replay in your head for days, moving between its many levels of inquiry and touched, always, by Polley’s compassion toward her relatives in particular and people in general.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The new film is slender, and it plays obliquely with the style of the 20th-century Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu: simple shots of simple people revealing universal truths.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    One of the smarter, more unexpectedly touching documentaries of the year, and I recommend it to you whether you love Rivers or loathe the very thought of her.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A hugely enjoyable shambles. It’s a comic deconstruction of that most useless of Hollywood artifacts — the blockbuster sequel — that refuses to take itself seriously on any level, which, face it, is just what we need as the summer boom-boom season shifts into high gear.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    As sagas of endurance in the face of ridiculous odds go, this story is up there with Shackleton and ''Into Thin Air.''
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    While the “Paradise Lost” films captured events as they unfolded in the heat of battle, West of Memphis has the luxury of at least partial closure.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    I don't usually make recommendations of this kind, but if you or your kids have gone to a burger joint in the last few weeks, you really do need to see this movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    By forgoing actual human beings, the director has made his most charming, least annoyingly fey film - a thing of lovely comic wisdom.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    It’s not a gimmick if it works, and “Tower” works unnervingly well. The film is essentially an oral history, with firsthand accounts from those who were there — survivors, responders, and onlookers — with their words read by younger actors.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A messy, congenial empowerment story that knows how aggravating adolescence can be when you refuse to fit in.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A meditation on fame, acting, aging, and acceptance, “Clouds” is a multilayered rapture on the subject of woman, performing. Not only does the film demand repeat viewings, it rewards them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Epic in scope, ambition, and execution, it's a classic swords-and-samurai film with postmodern blood and guts, and it's completely satisfying.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Rambles without apparent purpose, and yet it blooms in emotional impact as it goes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The achievement of this simply told, exceptionally fine film is the clarity with which it portrays the drama of a good soul in an inert body.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Krisha sucks you into its gradually worsening family dynamic with a confidence of style and a maturity of observation that is remarkable in a home-brewed Kickstarter movie. At times you laugh in horror. At other times you shrink from the screen. There are truths here.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    There's nothing out there remotely like Meek's Cutoff, for which some viewers may be thankful. The ending seems calculated to drive the literal-minded screaming out of the theater and yet it's the only possible way out.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A fairly standard coming-of-age saga on its face, with an effectively pained performance by 15-year-old Lucas Jade Zumann holding center stage.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    One of the funniest yet most depressing movies in Martin Scorsese’s long career — a celebration and evisceration of male savagery, financial division. It’s like “GoodFellas,” only (slightly) more legal, which is very much the point.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A comedy, and for all its cliches and clumsiness, close to a great one.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The film, dazzling and poignant and five years in the making, retells the ancient Indian epic "The Ramayana" from a gentle but insistent feminist perspective.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Moneyball is a hilarious and provocative change-up, entertaining without feeling the need to swing for the fences.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Carlos moves like a greyhound out of the gate, fleet and assured and focused on the business at hand. It's a subtle, ultimately staggering portrayal of a bloody-minded ideologue who convinced only himself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The movie’s a chocolate box of nougaty performances, from Christopher Plummer’s delightful depiction of Tolstoy as a ribald old naïf to Paul Giamatti twirling his waxed mustache and playing to the gallery as Vladimir Chertkov.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A rambunctious joy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    As a ranking cabinet minister in the brutally funny political satire In the Loop, actor Peter Capaldi unfurls dazzling verbal ribbons of the foulest language imaginable, thunderbolts of vulgarity that carry the force of precision carpet-bombing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Mustang is a damning portrait of the lot of women in rural Turkish society, but its outrage and empathy spill over the sides of the movie to embrace the planet as a whole — anywhere a woman is condemned for all the thoughts others have about her.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Silent Souls is a road movie, a guy movie, a treatise on burial customs in northern Russia. Mostly it's a sigh at the way entire cultures can slip away in the flow of time. It's lovely and slow and melancholic and short - 75 minutes, yet you feel you've been gone for an epoch or two.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The Past, the new film from Iranian director Asghar Farhadi, is taut, quiet, democratic, observant — a fine meal made with rare and subtle ingredients.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The opening 15 minutes of Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World are so well crafted that they restore your faith in commercial cinema.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Ty Burr
    The result has the dingy grace of pigeons flying across an urban wasteland.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Ty Burr
    For once, too, David Mamet the director outshines David Mamet the writer.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Ty Burr
    For a movie that's mostly a plotless mix of old sci-fi flicks and Bowie-esque gender-bending, Rocky Horror continues to charm. That's due in part to the honest delight we take in the freedoms this movie so cheerfully flaunts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Ty Burr
    Ang Lee's film of the Jane Austen novel slavishly follows the gospel according to Merchant Ivory, swooning over characters declaiming modestly while surrounded by topiary.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Ty Burr
    The improvisations are a mixed bag -- Reed and Fox are surprisingly hilarious, while Roseanne is a shrieking horror show -- but the air of gentle play and a wistful sense that Brooklyn is some kind of lost Eden put this one up on the more structured "Smoke."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Jeff Feuerzeig's film is as good a portrait of the artist as a beloved basket case as you'll see, but it's kept from greatness by the questions it refuses to ask itself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    This is at bottom a pulp thriller that strains -- sometimes pretentiously, at other times with gutter magnificence -- to reach the level of basic human truths.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    This is a movie that’s 168 minutes only because Quentin Tarantino is an uncontainable Rabelasian. He believes that more is more. And sometimes it is. But a truly great craftsman knows where to locate the line.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Where Pina excels - where it resembles no previous dance film - is in the staging of several of Bausch's signature works for Wenders's cameras.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    If you’re going to make a dopey, bawdy, foul-mouthed, predictable lady-buddy-cop movie, you might as well make it funny. And until it overstays its welcome in the final half-hour, The Heat is shamefully funny.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Savages is Oliver Stone's strongest work in years - a stylish, violent, hallucinatory thriller with both a mean streak and a devilish sense of humor.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    The Assassin achieves a pitch of the cinematic sublime of which very few filmmakers are capable, but it doesn’t make much traditional sense. Hou could do that, if he wants, but he’s after more rarefied game.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    The movie never goes as deep as the novel (no movie could), but it's a worthy approximation: a Merchant-Ivory movie that turns in on itself with a lucid and painful sigh.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Abramoff may be in prison but the mindset that produced him -- and the pay-to-play government it needs to survive -- is triumphant.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Rogue Nation unfolds with fluid, twisty, old-school pleasure — you settle into it like a favorite chair.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    A perfectly enjoyable star vehicle that does exactly what it sets out to do. [7 May 1999, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    The film's slick and entertaining, an obvious must-see for musical hounds.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    A damn-near great end-of-the-world zombie movie, terrifying on the basic heebie-jeebie level, respectful toward its B-movie forebears, and all the more unnerving for coming out in this fretful era of SARS and germ warfare.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    I'm still not sure what "source code" means here. I suspect the actors, the director, and the screenwriter haven't a clue either. But the thing keeps you watching.

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