For 51 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Wes Greene's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 88 La Última Película
Lowest review score: 12 After
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 51
  2. Negative: 12 out of 51
51 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Wes Greene
    A documentary whatsit acutely aware of the inherent performance people put into social discourse to maintain appearances.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Wes Greene
    The film has an atmosphere of endless experimentation, which compliments the constant revision the subjects apply to their lives in the wake of their economic insecurity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Wes Greene
    The film isn't so much about "the end of cinema" as it is about the people who abuse the medium and their subjects for their own political agenda.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    Perhaps Sanjay Rawal's most fascinating excursion into agriculture's dark side is the vineyards of Napa Valley, where the practically Eden-like scenery masks a dreary labor model.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    The doc emerges not so much as a glimpse into the mind of a dying artist than as a factual drama on how loved ones are impacted by an individual's death.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    In its visionary dream and flashback sequences, the film becomes a comment on the rapidly diminished state of traditional animation.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    The visible numbness and empty stares of the doc's three subjects painfully evoke years of being gripped by the war on drugs.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    Rarely do the interviewees express their own thoughts on Beltracchi, as Birkenstock lets him speak for himself, for better and for worse.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    It effectively implies that the subjects' troublemaking is the stuff of transience, a phase before they're ushered into the realm of adult responsibility.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Wes Greene
    Like their earlier Trouble the Water, Carl Deal and Tia Lessin portray men and women yearning for a simple place in society as they become casualties to the self-involvement of larger forces.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    Daniel Patrick Carbone's pensive style, so dotted with ethnographic detail, is interested in revealing a world in flux, but his fixation on death is so incessant that it situates the film as a morose fetish object.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    First-person accounts from individuals most affected by the drop in agricultural productivity are rarely the focus of the film's vision.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    Pegi Vail beautifully edited film somehow addresses a lot, but ultimately says nothing at all.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    A rigidly predetermined film that runs on the fumes of hackneyed plot points, squandering at nearly every turn a humanistic study of a family's struggle to maintain a tenable bond with one another.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    Its fixation on life's quotidian aspects gives way to a less imaginative focus on an inevitable and overly familiar romance.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    Yael Melamede doesn't dwell on each of her subjects' stories beyond the condensed version that's related on screen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    The filmmakers refuse to promote a political agenda of their own in order to let the varied convictions of others foster a necessary dialogue.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    It offers a realistic portrayal of Momo's emotional state, but this comes at the expense of a deeper exploration into both the story's lush supernatural landscape and its inhabitants.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    The unbalanced appraisal of Vidal's life and work in Nicholas Wrathall's documentary diminishes the effect of the writer's engaging dissension of American political policy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    The sobering quality that informs both the documentary's aesthetic and content largely suppresses any spontaneity or much-needed moments of levity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    It appears afraid of alienating viewers by overloading on scientific jargon, and in the process becomes too attracted to ultimately superfluous anecdotes from her subjects.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    It may channel the loose, adrenaline-fueled lives of pilots, but the film's inconsistent, often impassive study of this intriguing real-life adventure feels half-told.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    The trust that Bulletproof's filmmakers have in their cast and their talent is humanely and succinctly illustrated throughout.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    The doc is too enamored with Cenk Uygur and his convictions that it hews more closely to being a conventional and one-sided biographical portrait.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    The material and resources are certainly substantial, but the filmmakers clumsily weave separate stories together without detailing anything beyond a tangential relation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    It's something unique for both a genre exercise and a documentary: a science-fiction film that doesn't contain an ounce of fiction.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Wes Greene
    Director Fredrik Gertten's Bikes vs. Cars is passionate but contradictory, a frustrating combination for a documentary that utilizes admittedly interesting data as a pitch to wean our car-crazed world off excessive driving.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    In the end, Adam Green reminds us that he's all to eager to go for the easy thrill.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    Like the characters, the film's exterior flash can't conceal a glaring emptiness.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Wes Greene
    Even though the subtext about the past and modernity constantly being at odds throughout the setting's changing times is intriguing, the director presents this in a clunky, almost didactic fashion.

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