User Score
8.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 195 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 13 out of 195

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  1. Mar 9, 2011
    6
    This is my first foray into the Divinity universe. I must say at first I was quite impressed with the striking visuals, fleshed-out characters and deep world. However, after the first ten hours or so, I began to start feeling like I was playing an MMO -- I had amassed a huge quest log (complete with question marks floating over characters' heads) containing many mundane tasks ("CollectThis is my first foray into the Divinity universe. I must say at first I was quite impressed with the striking visuals, fleshed-out characters and deep world. However, after the first ten hours or so, I began to start feeling like I was playing an MMO -- I had amassed a huge quest log (complete with question marks floating over characters' heads) containing many mundane tasks ("Collect Goblin Hearts" or "Kill these 6 monsters"). I kind of get bored when I have so many "quests" going on that I don't remember what they are, who I got them from, or why on Rivelon I should care. I guess this is RPG bread and butter, but I couldn't shake that WoW-flavored malaise.

    That's not to say there aren't cool highlights. The combat is often quite fun for an RPG, with cover and maneuvering playing important roles in tough fights. Claiming your dragon powers lead to many hours of fun exploration (coupled with quite a bit of easy and repetitive aerial combat - just strafe in circles and fire away). Conquering the Battle Tower opens an interesting "home upgrade" system, which is ultimately not too customizable or rewarding.

    However, to me the biggest flaw in the game is the equipment. In a game where finding good loot is paramount, the game seriously falls on it's face. Almost every piece of weaponry, armor, jewelry, etc, provides 6 or 7 benefits - making comparison nearly impossible. The items are randomly generated, Diablo style, so seeing names like "Supportive Bronze Ridged Ring of the Warrior Gods" and "Overlord's Ornate Amethyst Ring of Eternal Burning" is common (Complete with color-coded rarity levels). By the way, those two rings I named each have seven benefits and are nearly identical in function. The overall effect of this is that I simply cannot be bothered to care what I'm equipped with after a while. After 10 minutes trying to compare the stats of a new warhammer and a shortsword, while on pause in the heat of battle, I often just randomly picked one. Or more often picked whichever looked cooler.

    All in all, it's worth a look if you're a big RPG nerd craving countless missions and statistical analysis. Others should probably steer to something a little more 'fun'.
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  2. Sep 30, 2011
    6
    I was enjoying this game via Onlive until I met the archers who poison you.... and the preceding "I have been poisoned" "This poison is killing me" got a tad to annoying for me.. and also the fact you can not disable the voice?! Good game, but not via OnLive unless you dont mind being poisoned ^_^
  3. Mar 12, 2012
    6
    This game has a unique feel about it. The skill tree is second to none, and the ability to read minds is a fantastic feature. The world is a little more open than fable and a little more closed off than KOA-reckoning. Loot is randomized and often quite satisfying. The game's design is a little scattershot, veering from interesting to poor in equal turn. Combat is simplistic, however theThis game has a unique feel about it. The skill tree is second to none, and the ability to read minds is a fantastic feature. The world is a little more open than fable and a little more closed off than KOA-reckoning. Loot is randomized and often quite satisfying. The game's design is a little scattershot, veering from interesting to poor in equal turn. Combat is simplistic, however the amount of interchangeable skills counterbalances this. Art direction is also inconsistent, with some sights being breathtaking and others being generic. The music is sweet - however it's also disconnecting and times, and never feels empowering. A strong game that has some extreme lows and extreme highs in rapid succession. Recommended to those who want something a little different in tone, and are willing to put up with some major pacing issues. Expand
  4. Jul 30, 2011
    6
    Interesting story combined with new gameplay mechanics had this game going...too bad the developers dropped the ball in movement controls, quest-lines, and overall polish. Level/terrain design, smoothness of combat, and overall functions also hindered this game.13 hours in and I finally had to give it up.
  5. May 25, 2012
    6
    A considerable improvement over Ego Draconis. The game has one of the best written dialogues even compared to more famed RPGs out there. The story itself isn't bad, although it could use a bit better delivery. The graphics isn't great, with dated textures and uninspiring design. Special effects animations are also scarce and unimpressive. The performance is significantly improved over EgoA considerable improvement over Ego Draconis. The game has one of the best written dialogues even compared to more famed RPGs out there. The story itself isn't bad, although it could use a bit better delivery. The graphics isn't great, with dated textures and uninspiring design. Special effects animations are also scarce and unimpressive. The performance is significantly improved over Ego Draconis, but the highest graphics settings still require a high-end computer. Combat could've been smoother and slower; often everything's happening too fast and unsatisfying. Side-quests are various and non-monotonic, although more focus would be great. Loot and crafting (gems, enchantments, alchemy) are diverse and well-randomized, but don't expect something as satisfying as Diablo II or Dragon Age. Overall the game is still entertaining, but it lacks the sense of satisfaction that keeps players addicted. Expand
  6. Jan 10, 2015
    5
    Alright, I've played a lot of video games in my time, and I've studied a healthy deal of literature and literary analysis. I will say right off the bat that this review comes from the mind of a person who approaches video games with the perspective of a literary scholar - if you're just looking for a few hours of something to do, Divinity 2 is fine for that. However, if you're looking forAlright, I've played a lot of video games in my time, and I've studied a healthy deal of literature and literary analysis. I will say right off the bat that this review comes from the mind of a person who approaches video games with the perspective of a literary scholar - if you're just looking for a few hours of something to do, Divinity 2 is fine for that. However, if you're looking for something more interesting, you might want to take heed.
    First of all, don't let the ads and reviews fool you: The dragon mechanic IS kind of cool, but ultimately it feels very lacking. In the Ego Draconis content there's only one area you really feel like you're flying freely around, and there are 'anti-dragon zones' that prevent you from entering on pain of near-instant death. There aren't even tooltips or anything warning you, just just figure out that entering the wavy bubble shields as a dragon means you die and have to reload, which can be a really bitter lesson. Also, throw away any ideas you have of raining fiery death from above. You can't target most ground units as a dragon, only certain structures. Dragon armor has some use, but only gives bonuses to dragon abilities, not any kind of protection. The dragon function really only feels as good as it's advertised in the very last sequence of Flames of Vengeance (I should also note that said sequence is the only time you can use dragon form in the entire package), and even then, it wasn't all I expected. All in all, don't expect the dragon form to be as awesome as others might seem to make it.
    With that out of the way, another huge problem here is how pointless the whole thing feels after a bit of content. The loading screen tips say "consequences are irreversible" for your decisions, but I never felt like my decisions really had any impact. A non-spoiler hypothetical example - not from the game - would be having to decide between saving your best friend or you significant other, but either way the one who "dies" is revealed to have actually survived to come back later. At first you think this was just a little twist, but then you find that every single decision is just the same. Not only that, but there's no real free-roam feeling. All the side-quests are built in to help you level and progress - failing to do them will pit your level 9 character against groups of level 12 enemies, I found - so they feel like a part of the main game, not like they're additional things you can consider doing. So ultimately all your hard-earned gear, skills, spells, and abilities go towards the main story of the game and nothing else. Once the game ends, it ends, and everything you just did is no longer relevant. That's not a feeling I like to have - I like the feeling I have in KOTOR II, where my choices can really impact the game and even my companions need to have good gear or I'm the one who's boned. Even though there's limited free-roam in KOTOR II, it still felt like I didn't have to do almost every quest to level properly (in fact, my first few runthroughs, I didn't do many side-quests).
    And then there's the STORY. The entire cast is extremely forgettable - Commander Rhodes, your former Dragon Slayer mentor, is seen three times in the entirety of Ego Draconis, and never for very long. You learn through hearsay that she's apparently the best of the Dragon Slayers - I never would've known. She's made out to be some critical, important player in the story, but you hardly ever see her, and in Flames of Vengeance, whatever kind of character arc she had doesn't even get any kind of proper closure. Names and characters like Lord Lovis, the cursed Dragon Knight whose soul haunts his tower in penance for his crimes, and Talana, last of the Dragon Knights, are introduced, but just those descriptions I get are the extent of their character. You now know about as much of them as I do. Play the game and learn just a teensy bit more and then never hear of them or from them ever again. Everything in the game feels extremely disposable, like I could've gone without doing or hearing or learning of it, yet that's the whole game. Nothing about the story seemed to matter eventually - after the beginning, it felt like characters were introduced only to exit stage left the moment the scene ended and never return. Even in Flames of Vengeance, which apparently was meant to bring "closure", nothing of the sort really comes. Even the ending feels incomplete.
    This game is not what it's made out to be. It's not AWFUL - it's worth the buy if it's on sale for a decent price - and I wouldn't call it bad, even. But it's extremely rough-hewn and half-baked, and all the features advertised are blown out of proportion to the point where it almost felt like a different game than advertised. Get it if it's on sale and you need something to do and nothing else is available, but just keep in mind the whole mythos of the badass Dragon Knight is a bunch of dragon ****
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Metascore
82

Generally favorable reviews - based on 9 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 9
  2. Negative: 0 out of 9
  1. Jan 11, 2011
    80
    Dragon Knight Saga solves many of the problems of the original Ego Dragonis thanks to an updated engine, a heaviliy modified 360 version, and an expansion that completes the original title, letting shine many of the great things Larian achived with the original launch. The result is a fantastic Hack'n Slash with a surprising deepness, excellent mission design, great sense of humour, and tons of quality content.
  2. Jan 11, 2011
    90
    The Dragon Knight Saga contains two great role-playing games in one brilliant package. These are games every fan of the genre should try, provided they do not mind action-based combat instead of virtual dice.
  3. Jan 4, 2011
    82
    The Dragon Knight Saga is a solid RPG with a funny gameplay and a nice proposal.