MouseCraft PlayStation Vita

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Mixed or average reviews - based on 4 Critics What's this?

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Mixed or average reviews- based on 12 Ratings

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  • Summary: Crunching Koalas, the team behind the title, promises that its debut outing combines the best elements of Tetris and Lemmings to create a puzzle experience that really tests your wits. Moreover, the game features a level editor, and is both cross-buy and cross-save compatible.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 4
  2. Negative: 0 out of 4
  1. Jul 16, 2014
    All in all, though, what you see is exactly what you get. You're still trying to get all your mice from Point A to Point B, and you have to do that over and over again.
  2. Games Master UK
    Aug 24, 2014
    The Vita's touch controls feel a bit cramped and fiddly. [Oct 2014, p.80]
  3. Jul 11, 2014
    If you want to work your brain for a few minutes, MouseCraft is a good choice (especially on Vita).
  4. Jul 21, 2014
    Forgoing the sort of melon-twisting substance that has seen many code-cracking gamers pull their hair out in favor of a pick-up-and-play puzzler with plenty of Pixar-flavored appeal, MouseCraft is usually a fun little romp. Much like that block of Muenster in the back of your fridge, though, it's a game you'll likely forget about a week after you buy it.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 1
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Aug 7, 2015
    The winner of the worst named video game is MouseCraft. Behind the awful pun MouseCraft is a technically strong puzzle game that sadly lacksThe winner of the worst named video game is MouseCraft. Behind the awful pun MouseCraft is a technically strong puzzle game that sadly lacks sufficient charm to make it a great game.

    Where MouseCraft succeeds is in its well executed simple gameplay and 80 well varied levels. The levels are well designed and vary nicely in terms of challenge and design. The gameplay is simple and easy to pick up. The game plays as a blend of lemmings with tetris blocks, it plays nicely but it does not feel fresh. In a lab you must guide 3 suicidal mice safely to the cheese by creating a path across the stage using a set collection of tetris blocks. In this journey there are optional crystals to collect to unlock further levels. Levels can be completed in a multiple of ways, however usually only one way will result in collecting all the crystals. Fast restarts and the ability to freeze time solidifies the experience.

    The game is simple yet effective. As levels are short and can be beaten in a few minutes it can become an addictive experience blasting through multiple levels in a row. The difficult peaks at different points making the player really think about certain stages, offering the frustration you almost expect of a well designed puzzler. However the difficulty peaks appear to be random, around 3/4s of the game through, making the end appear too easy.

    The greatest downfall of this game is that it is forgettable. The formula is too familiar and there re no twists. While blocks change in nature,some break, some explode, these are expected mechanics and nut surprises. From playing a few levels you have a clear idea where the game will go. That is not the exciting journey a gamer expects in this era of creativity.

    MouseCraft lacks the required character and charm gamers have come to expect in this genre. The bar is high and the delivery is lacking. There was an attempt at a quirky story with the professor and the mice but it just falls flat and lacklustre. They should have cracked it up to 11 and played more on the ridiculous elements and given life to the lemming mice. Moreover the stage backgrounds are just cliche science lab scenery and lack any innovation. And with this the graphical style and music are forgettable.

    Overall not that memorable a game but definitely a technically proficient puzzle game that will appeal to the puzzler for a few days before ultimately being forgotten.