Warner Bros. Pictures | Release Date: December 20, 1971
7.8
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 624 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
498
Mixed:
30
Negative:
96
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10
billJul 10, 2009
This is indeed one of Stanley Kubrick best films. Malcom Macdowell was cast perfectly as Alex del Large and I can't believe he didn't get an Acadamy Award nomination for this role. Truly a classic.
3 of 3 users found this helpful
9
PaulOct 3, 2005
If you haven't read Burgesses book, the British version that is, you'll not understand that Kubrick was working sans the 21st chapter. Regardless, the film is a sylistic acheivement. As for the moral outrage displayed by at least If you haven't read Burgesses book, the British version that is, you'll not understand that Kubrick was working sans the 21st chapter. Regardless, the film is a sylistic acheivement. As for the moral outrage displayed by at least one reviewer, sorry, you missed the point. Gloopy you are. Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
JakeB.Aug 11, 2006
An almost perfect rendering of the novel by Anthony Burgess. Kubrick's use of classical music somehow insulates the viewer from the true horror of the violence. The set and costume design is a visual feast. Kubrick never ceases to amaze An almost perfect rendering of the novel by Anthony Burgess. Kubrick's use of classical music somehow insulates the viewer from the true horror of the violence. The set and costume design is a visual feast. Kubrick never ceases to amaze this viewer. Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
DanielS.Oct 9, 2009
To be perfectly honest, i loved the first part (until 41:35)... it was legendary beyond belief. A nice, warm vibratey feeling all through your guttiwuts.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
AiwassT.May 5, 2010
Its brilliant and yet brilliantly disturbing which is exactly the point. It was meant to be just a little over the top , most satire is.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
CTLOct 24, 2009
Futuristic in that even now, we watch movies featuring gratuitous decadence and ultra-violence, and A Clockwork Orange still retains all of its moral and artistic impact. A provocative worldview and reflection of individuals as well. Futuristic in that even now, we watch movies featuring gratuitous decadence and ultra-violence, and A Clockwork Orange still retains all of its moral and artistic impact. A provocative worldview and reflection of individuals as well. Definitely requires a good amount of maturity from the viewer. Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
ErickOct 5, 2005
A real masterpiece! A must see for anyone who considers a serious moviegoer.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
9
MichaelR.Oct 10, 2007
Malcolm McDowell gave such a wonderful performance. I believe that his performance was the backbone of the movie.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
brentoniNov 3, 2007
Arguably Kubrick's best; my favorite movie of all time.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
VikJJan 29, 2008
Kubrick's a genius and you can't help but be entertained by the mischief of McDowell's character.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
SeanHDec 1, 2009
Chicago reader.....why must you bring this briliant movie down? If metacritic knew any better, they would take that shite review down. This movie is genius, as is kubrick.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
ConnorCMar 9, 2010
It is disturbing alright, but it is brilliant for what Stanley Kubrick directed for this. It is weird too, but who cares? I love it!
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
JamesM.Dec 20, 2005
Ebert, you fail once again. This movie is a classic, chilling masterpiece of cinema. However, I did find this line quite amusing: "Alex has been made into a sadistic rapist not by society, not by his parents, not by the police state, not by Ebert, you fail once again. This movie is a classic, chilling masterpiece of cinema. However, I did find this line quite amusing: "Alex has been made into a sadistic rapist not by society, not by his parents, not by the police state, not by centralization and not by creeping fascism -- but by the producer, director and writer of this film, Stanley Kubrick." Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
JarrodO.Jan 18, 2006
best sureal movie ever one of my favorites as for the negitive comment he chose the first release of the book where the editor cut the part of him growing up. look like YOU should have done your reasearch also the slang is just based of the nadsat.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
RyencokeJul 23, 2006
This is one of the greatest movies ever made.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
DApr 28, 2007
It is easy to see as all the other ratings on this movie there is no line here you love this movie or you hate this move I love this movie and all of Kubricks movies including Eyes Wide Shut there will never bee another director like him and It is easy to see as all the other ratings on this movie there is no line here you love this movie or you hate this move I love this movie and all of Kubricks movies including Eyes Wide Shut there will never bee another director like him and I am happy about that he was one of a kind and for all the pepole that dont know look at his ratings on other films in sci-fi, horror and war. Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
JackT.Oct 26, 2008
One of Kubrick's finest movies.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
10
TomPDec 9, 2009
From start to finish, the best movie I've ever seen.
1 of 1 users found this helpful
9
JoshLMay 16, 2010
Frank B. you are the reason this film doesn't get taken seriously sometimes. The idea of the film is that criminality is wrong, yet is it right to not be criminal if it isn't upon ones own free will? Is criminality a simple act of Frank B. you are the reason this film doesn't get taken seriously sometimes. The idea of the film is that criminality is wrong, yet is it right to not be criminal if it isn't upon ones own free will? Is criminality a simple act of rebellion or is it something more? Its interesting and philosophical and obviously not appreciated by a fool like you who enjoys the horrific violence. Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful
8
FIlmsareawesomeAug 31, 2011
Stanley Kubrick did a good job with this film, i though for the time (1971), this was a huge step in film industry, like the robberies, the drugs, the violence, the nudity, everything, so in that aspect i liked to see a film like that beingStanley Kubrick did a good job with this film, i though for the time (1971), this was a huge step in film industry, like the robberies, the drugs, the violence, the nudity, everything, so in that aspect i liked to see a film like that being made in that time. Some scenes were very shocking and weird, but that's part of the movie, it's the way the director wants to show to the public, the intensity of this film. So it's a good 8. Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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10
Paul_YoonSep 23, 2010
Kubrick marvellously questions toward the society about the 'real' definition of virtue and evil. Kubrick successfully followed the original storyline (of course, some of the storylines are deviated from the original) and attracted theKubrick marvellously questions toward the society about the 'real' definition of virtue and evil. Kubrick successfully followed the original storyline (of course, some of the storylines are deviated from the original) and attracted the audiences to make a different point of view. Expand
11 of 14 users found this helpful113
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8
CinemassacreMar 13, 2016
Throughout his 50-year career, and especially in his great films, director Stanley Kubrick had a penchant for taking the novels of others and re-shaping them to fit his own vision. Of the 16 movies Kubrick directed (including his finalThroughout his 50-year career, and especially in his great films, director Stanley Kubrick had a penchant for taking the novels of others and re-shaping them to fit his own vision. Of the 16 movies Kubrick directed (including his final feature, Eyes Wide Shut), the film maker was credited with script involvement in 12 of them. For that reason, 2001 is not referred to as "Arthur C. Clarke's 2001" but as "Stanley Kubrick's 2001." Dr. Strangelove is "Kubrick's Strangelove" not Peter George's. The motion picture version of The Shining owes a greater debt to the director than to author Stephen King. Similarly, the driving force behind A Clockwork Orange was more Kubrick than novelist Anthony Burgess.

One of the first things that will strike anyone watching A Clockwork Orange today is how thoroughly modern it looks. If not for the presence of the youthful face of established thespian Malcolm McDowell, one could be forgiven the assumption that the movie was made far more recently than 1971. Unlike many of its contemporaries, A Clockwork Orange is in no way dated, and the issues it addresses are as urgent today as they were three decades ago. How many other films from the early '70s can make this statement?

Part of the reason for the movie's contemporary look is Kubrick's forward-thinking philosophy of film making. From Lolita onwards, the director pushed the envelope. (In fact, one could argue that he did it before the 1962 film - overtly homosexual scenes from Spartacus were cut at the studio's insistence.) While human nature may not have changed since 1971, motion picture standards have. There is copious nudity, sex, and violence in A Clockwork Orange. And, while the sex is not pornographic and the violence is not explicit, they were pervasive enough to initially earn the movie an X rating. Today, the saltier elements of A Clockwork Orange fall into the mainstream of the MPAA's R category (and the film has since been re-classified as such).

A Clockwork Orange is not an easy motion picture to absorb or digest. Oddly, the sex and violence are easier to take than the razor-sharp edge of Kubrick's satire and the corresponding awareness of its pinpoint accuracy when addressing the issue of the dehumanization of people. As I write this in 1999, the extremities of A Clockwork Orange have not come to pass, but society is slowly moving down the slippery slope that the movie cautions against. I have the disturbing feeling that if the solution to crime proposed by the film (brainwashing) was medically and economically feasible, the government would leap onto the bandwagon. When one character speaks of our willingness to "sell liberty for a quieter life," it strikes an ominously familiar chord. Under its current mayor, New York City has yielded numerous freedoms in return for a reduction in the crime rate. And in Russia, the famished citizens would give up all their newly acquired rights for the promise of full bellies.

Many have watched A Clockwork Orange without understanding what it all means. And for those who take everything presented on screen in a straightforward manner, a certain amount of confusion will result. But, like Terry Gilliam's Brazil, George Orwell's 1984, and other futuristic political satires, A Clockwork Orange is meant to be understood as part allegory, part black comedy, and part drama. The film takes aim at the ineffective and inhumane methods often devised by governments to stem criminal behavior, asking what sacrifices we're willing to make to live in relative security. Then there's the trickier question of whether the removal of free will destroys an individual's essential humanity. Does the State have the right to do this, to "kill the criminal reflex"? Would execution be a preferable fate? Finally, Kubrick illustrates the fickle nature of public opinion. Those that laud the government's methods one day revile them the next.

A Clockwork Orange is not a pretty or comfortable experience. It does not pander to the crowd-pleasing mentality that shapes the structure of many films. (In that scenario, a Rambo-like Alex would have avenged himself upon all of his wrongdoers in the final fifteen minutes.) But it demands thought, compels the attention, and refuses to be dismissed. And, for that reason, A Clockwork Orange must be considered a landmark of modern cinema.
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3 of 4 users found this helpful31
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8
grandpajoe6191Oct 6, 2011
Stanley Kubrick asks the audience a difficult question of whenether the sins of mankind should be adjusted or not. His film "A Clockwork Orange" doesn't really answer the prompt, but reflects it back to the audience and makes them deeplyStanley Kubrick asks the audience a difficult question of whenether the sins of mankind should be adjusted or not. His film "A Clockwork Orange" doesn't really answer the prompt, but reflects it back to the audience and makes them deeply think about what morale we are exposed to, and if the morale we believe in is just or unjust. Expand
12 of 17 users found this helpful125
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10
DavudNov 12, 2008
An absolutely brilliant film. Funny, disturbing, visually superb, well-acted. Above all, a film with a timeless message only second in its satirical glory to Dr. Strangelove.
1 of 2 users found this helpful
10
KieranFDec 7, 2008
An essential classic.
1 of 2 users found this helpful
10
AlexDeLargeDec 14, 2003
One of the greatest films ever created.
1 of 2 users found this helpful
8
jigooAug 16, 2012
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. for me this entire movie is just a bunch of unpleasant events that happen around Alex's life. he obviously has a horrible disorder that just makes him enjoy all of the pain that he causes people. this doesnt mean that the movie is bad, in fact, its very good. but if you are not up to watching two hours of murder, rape, torture, pain, and a lot of violent retribution, then pass this movie up. but just a warning, even if you can stand those types of actions, dont expect to be able to breeze through the movie. i have a very strong resistance to feeling uncomfortable to movies like this, and it really brought up a bunch of uneasiness and depression. its a movie thats good ,but not enjoyable to watch Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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10
talisencrwApr 16, 2016
As time goes by, I'll always appreciate my Grade 10 English class (1984-85), taught by Mr. Terry. Looking back, it's probably the year that I was introduced to the most great literary works of all my life (especially 'Anthem' by Ayn Rand andAs time goes by, I'll always appreciate my Grade 10 English class (1984-85), taught by Mr. Terry. Looking back, it's probably the year that I was introduced to the most great literary works of all my life (especially 'Anthem' by Ayn Rand and 'Nausea' by Jean-Paul Sartre). Included that year in the course's curriculum was Anthony Burgess' dystopian masterwork, 'A Clockwork Orange' (as well as George Orwell's 'Animal Farm'--like Frank Sinatra would have said, 'It was a very good year'). I was mesmerized with it from the instant I noticed the unique approach to language, the 'ultraviolence' and of course, the eternal question of free will, its relationship to good-and-evil, and the can of worms of the myriad of ethical dilemmas that comes to the fore of individual freedom and rights versus that of society at large. The genius of Burgess was being able to put so well and forcibly, yet in such an entertaining way, so many issues that, had most anyone else set forth on the endeavor, would have come up with the type of off-putting, heavy-handed sermon that would never have reached such a literary pinnacle, and been required reading even now, generations later. It hasn't aged or dated a day.

Most cinematic observers felt the book unfilmable. Director Kubrick's adaptations work so well, particularly this, '2001: A Space Odyssey' and 'The Shining' (even though Stephen King would fervently disagree about the latter) because he, as he did with 'Dr. Strangelove', can so easily both find unforgettable visual metaphors for his ideas and so handily combine humour (an under-recognized trait of his, much more readily associated with say, Sir Alfred Hitchcock) with these heavy and daunting philosophical and intellectual volleys. In the wrong hands (particularly a Stanley Kramer, or his ilk), this could have failed miserably, like typical cinematic treatments of Ayn Rand novels. But this worked triumphantly, and heartily exemplifies one of the greatest directors ever at the apex of his craftsmanship. No self-respecting cinephile can avoid this movie, and I heartily recommend you to read the novel as well, though Kubrick nails it so effectively, reading the novel isn't necessary in the slightest for the film to be enjoyed.

One of the many 'gamechanger' films of Kubrick's extraordinary career.
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1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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10
MaxberdNov 28, 2015
This movie deserves it's 10 because you have to have a open mind when you watch a movie about rape and violence. This movie is not about making light of these subjects, but it is showing that anyone can choose what and who they want. Even ifThis movie deserves it's 10 because you have to have a open mind when you watch a movie about rape and violence. This movie is not about making light of these subjects, but it is showing that anyone can choose what and who they want. Even if it means that they choose the bad things. Malcolm McDowell's performance is great showing a handsome schoolboy turned into a villain. At the end of the movie not only do you feel bad for the "villain" but you will be rooting for him as well. Don't go into this movie being a saint and criticizing the movie just because you don't like violence. This movie has a deep meaning and you have to understand it before trying to say it is "Horrible and " Garbage. Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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10
FashionistStateAug 27, 2010
It's so goddamn weird...yet I love it. At first I wasn't sure what to think of it, but after a second viewing it grew on me. It stays fairly loyal to the novel, as well.
1 of 3 users found this helpful12
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10
txrangersfan72Jul 11, 2012
I turn 40 next month and it took me, a huge film lover, this long to see "A Clockwork Orange." In fact, I still haven't seen "Dr. Strangelove." Some film lover, huh? Well, I'd like to think that waiting this long has made me appreciate theI turn 40 next month and it took me, a huge film lover, this long to see "A Clockwork Orange." In fact, I still haven't seen "Dr. Strangelove." Some film lover, huh? Well, I'd like to think that waiting this long has made me appreciate the genius behind Kubrick's style a lot more than I would have 20 years ago. Anyone who would read this has probably already seen the film, so there is no need to rehash the plot. Instead, I want to specifically point out that Kubrick's consistent way of taking whatever twisted source material he is using to tell the story his way, no matter how much it may differ from the original, shows how incredible he was at not just choosing the right material, but filtering it literally and figuratively through lenses that show the viewer a little about what made him tick. Yes, it may come across as intentionally shocking, but he does it without seeming like he is intentionally doing it. He truly conveys a sense of artistic intent around his effort. It's not just trying to tell the viewer a story, but showing, via film, the grittiest, most impactful way to experience that story to get the most not just out of the plot, but every nugget of crisp detail. By now I've read numerous articles about how Kubrick made his individual films. A common message I get is that his genius and his end product is always thought of as top rate, but that those with whom he worked, even the original writers of the source material, conflicted with him. He demands a lot of his talent, reduces them to their barest art and brings out the best in them. This process isn't entirely enjoyed or appreciated by those with whom he worked, but I've seen a lot of films with the actors he uses and I cannot point to many, if any, efforts those actors do away from Kubrick that are better than the one they did with him. Malcolm McDowell is as perfect in "A Clockwork Orange" as I have ever seen him. His performance was raw, real, demented and just perfect. I was astounded to learn that one of the creepiest, most disturbing element of the film was him singing "Singin in the Rain" while beating the writer and meticulously preparing to brutally rape his wife, was improved by McDowell and not originally called for in the scene. The dichotomy of the brutal scene and the uplifting song amplified the creepiness of it all the more, proving that Kubrick had his actors right where he needed them to be. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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8
KingmushOct 1, 2010
http://mashupmash.blogspot.com/2010/09/clockwork-orange.html

Figured it was about time I sat down and watched this movie...so I did. I went in knowing it's a cult classic and loads of people talk about it and like it. When I was finished
http://mashupmash.blogspot.com/2010/09/clockwork-orange.html

Figured it was about time I sat down and watched this movie...so I did. I went in knowing it's a cult classic and loads of people talk about it and like it. When I was finished with it, I had to take a moment and recollect what I just saw. To me at first it was just a bunch of scenes that just tried to be weird. Everything about this movie was just so weird. Sort of wish they explained some of it more but that's a minor complaint. I also wish I read the book before hand so I'd perhaps have understood it much better. But nonetheless I think I got the point it was trying to make. Overall, I did really like this movie. While I wish the weirdness of everything was sort of explained I still liked it, same with the "futuristic" setting. I give this a 4 out of 5.
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0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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10
percy972Mar 10, 2011
This movie is seriously good. It is an artistic achievement of wonder with incredible scenes with a bad-ass combining of images and music that at the end has incredible quality.
0 of 3 users found this helpful03
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10
mattnog11Jan 10, 2012
An absolutely fantastic film. This movie's strangeness, and disturbing features are perfect. I have never seen a movie quite like this. truly one of the best movies i've ever seen. this film had not only crime and violence, and theAn absolutely fantastic film. This movie's strangeness, and disturbing features are perfect. I have never seen a movie quite like this. truly one of the best movies i've ever seen. this film had not only crime and violence, and the disturbing ways of some people, but it also showed disturbing ways in our society. It even relates to our society right now. it shows corruption secrets propaganda use. it has a bit of everything, I have already rewatched it several times and it is and will remain one of my all time favorite movies, but be warned this movie is not for children or people easily disturbed. it has language, violence, strong sexual content. many sexual themes. if ur gonna see this movie be prepared for a movie like u have never seen before, although it may not be as bad as some of the movies today, it still is disturbing. Collapse
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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10
AuraGuiderFeb 27, 2011
"That is me. That is a superb film." The book was amazing, and so was this film. A masterpiece in sort. Right when it started and i saw Alex's evil smirk, i knew just then that it would be a great movie. The movie is about horrible stuff, but"That is me. That is a superb film." The book was amazing, and so was this film. A masterpiece in sort. Right when it started and i saw Alex's evil smirk, i knew just then that it would be a great movie. The movie is about horrible stuff, but it's captured so greatly that it could only be one word, and one word only: Masterpiece. Expand
0 of 3 users found this helpful03
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8
TokyochuchuNov 14, 2012
A Clockwork Orange is a work of art from Stanley Kubrick. Each shot and sequence is lovingly crafted for supreme visual impact. The plot is interesting, the language is unique and the acting is great. A Clockwork Orange is truly aA Clockwork Orange is a work of art from Stanley Kubrick. Each shot and sequence is lovingly crafted for supreme visual impact. The plot is interesting, the language is unique and the acting is great. A Clockwork Orange is truly a 'one-of-a-kind' movie. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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9
filmtrashreviewJul 2, 2011
Innovative, spectacular and refreshing the strange acts and a perfect art department make this film stand out above the rest. I wasn't completely impressed with the film until nearly two hours in. I felt it was an artistic piece with littleInnovative, spectacular and refreshing the strange acts and a perfect art department make this film stand out above the rest. I wasn't completely impressed with the film until nearly two hours in. I felt it was an artistic piece with little to no meaning. However, A Clockwork Orange is a portrait of modern day rebellion and the reality of life. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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10
cameronmorewoodNov 8, 2012
Twisted and brilliant, haunting and hypnotic, A Clockwork Orange is one of the most complex and troubling films I've ever seen.
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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10
Skullgirlsfan13Jun 2, 2013
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Possibly the most strangest movie out there; which is fitting knowing the director Stanley Kuebrick, and that what make it so great. The story itself is very interesting, showing us the daily life of psychotic high schooler. That alone is worth a viewing. This obviously Malcom Mcdowell best known performance, seriously try and think of another good movie he was in. He does this role so perfectly that you can't help but love him, despite what horrible vile acts he does. So what makes this movie so enjoyable is the main character and the journey he goes through, but what good is that without obstacles to overcome? From gang fights, rape, breaking and entering, and government experimenting. While each bit is interesting and entertaining, the experimenting is a bit confusing. While it is one of the most famous scenes, afterwards it causes a bit of confusion. I know that we get to see a lot of Karma finally pay off for him, but the overall message is a bit hard to determine. Supposedly he lost his will; figuratively, so that means he can't fend for himself, that sounds nice, but I can't help that the director was trying to say more but was lost. That doesn't matter anyways, this is still an awesome, brilliant, outstanding movie. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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10
MovieGuysFeb 12, 2014
A Clockwork Orange uses of a taboo topic to actually rally against the same topic. The fact that Kubrick does that so persuasively earns the movie bragging rights immediately. Also, the movie leaves you with a feeling of remorse and eerinessA Clockwork Orange uses of a taboo topic to actually rally against the same topic. The fact that Kubrick does that so persuasively earns the movie bragging rights immediately. Also, the movie leaves you with a feeling of remorse and eeriness that it becomes hard to shake off. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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9
imilhoferDec 26, 2013
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. This film is a piece of art. It looks stunning, and captivates you from the beginning. Kubrick immerses you in the world his film is set in through colour, shadow and camera trickery. McDowell offers the perfectly uncomfortable mix between humour and horror, keeping the audience on edge and unsure of how to feel. Should we laugh when the woman's jumpsuit is torn off of her? Is the massive sculpture of a penis used as a weapon funny or disturbing? That's the beauty of Kubrick, and in many ways Burgess' novel everything is up in the air and nothing is certain. A mesmerizing, confusing and disorientating watch that will shock, baffle and overjoy. Better than the book. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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10
horcrux2007Sep 3, 2014
Kubrick asks difficult questions with his film "A Clockwork Orange" such as the true meaning of good and evil. "A Clockwork Orange" is very disturbing and shocking yet entertaining and darkly funny. It's intriguing, well-acted, andKubrick asks difficult questions with his film "A Clockwork Orange" such as the true meaning of good and evil. "A Clockwork Orange" is very disturbing and shocking yet entertaining and darkly funny. It's intriguing, well-acted, and beautifully shot, and I highly recommend it. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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10
Ojo7155Mar 23, 2016
This movie is a cinematic masterpiece. The message of free will really makes you think. While it's true that the violence can make you uncomfortable (especially during the first time watching), that's just how real life is. Nobody can denyThis movie is a cinematic masterpiece. The message of free will really makes you think. While it's true that the violence can make you uncomfortable (especially during the first time watching), that's just how real life is. Nobody can deny that the movie's morals, along with it's trade mark visuals (it's Kubrick, what do you expect), make this movie exceptional. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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7
PeterJ.Dec 31, 2007
After hearing about this movie for many, many years I finally decided to watch it when I saw it was available in Blu Ray. The beginning of the movie was a 10, but lost it's luster after a while. Overall, still a very good movie, After hearing about this movie for many, many years I finally decided to watch it when I saw it was available in Blu Ray. The beginning of the movie was a 10, but lost it's luster after a while. Overall, still a very good movie, especially being made in the 70's. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
JoseCJun 25, 2009
Ted K, im sorry about you, this is one of the greatest movies ever made, a classic, im not saying you are stupid or something like that, im just saying you have to admit it was a good movie, a really good movie, at least you gave it a 2, not Ted K, im sorry about you, this is one of the greatest movies ever made, a classic, im not saying you are stupid or something like that, im just saying you have to admit it was a good movie, a really good movie, at least you gave it a 2, not like the morons who give it a 0. it surprises me that it was made in the 70's, i watched it in the school while i was studying about the "super man" of Niietzche and i felt in love of it. sorry if my english is not good. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
emskds.Sep 28, 2005
I really have to go down on my knees for this film, i mean the culture, the texture, and the whole subjective toward this movie is amazing.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
KennethM.May 18, 2006
This movie, and the book, are rather a bit like seven samurai, in that if you have never seen it, you are incomplete.
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
AlanA.Dec 30, 2007
Easily one of the greatest movies ever filmed. Some are blinded from its violence and sexuality and just see it as a horrific film. Sad. Kubrick is awesome!
0 of 0 users found this helpful
7
MarkK.Jun 24, 2007
I first saw this movie in college and was awed by it. I just watched it over the weekend, 20 years later, and was disappointed. The book is better -- as are other Kubrick films: 2001, Dr. Strangelove, and The Shining. "Clockwork" is a miss, I first saw this movie in college and was awed by it. I just watched it over the weekend, 20 years later, and was disappointed. The book is better -- as are other Kubrick films: 2001, Dr. Strangelove, and The Shining. "Clockwork" is a miss, not a hit. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
PaulM.Feb 13, 2008
Quite simply THE GREATEST FILM EVER MADE.A masterpiece in every sense of the word,I cannot by any stretch of the imagination see this film being bettered or even arguably equaled.This film is stunning ,awesome ,and jaw droopingly brilliant Quite simply THE GREATEST FILM EVER MADE.A masterpiece in every sense of the word,I cannot by any stretch of the imagination see this film being bettered or even arguably equaled.This film is stunning ,awesome ,and jaw droopingly brilliant in every aspect. Genius Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
JimT.Aug 28, 2009
To take away a man's freedom of choice, no matter what the choice, is to take away humanity. Why do we root for poor Alex at the end? What's the matter with us? It's a testament to Kubrick's genius and his unrelenting To take away a man's freedom of choice, no matter what the choice, is to take away humanity. Why do we root for poor Alex at the end? What's the matter with us? It's a testament to Kubrick's genius and his unrelenting style that this movie, once seen, will not leave. And by the way, Malcolm McDowell must have had to endure the most trials of just about any leading actor to date, to a mesmerizing result. Truly a masterpiece. Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful
10
KennyNov 25, 2008
One of the greatest movies of all time. Its completely mesmerizing from beginning to end.
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10
FrankBDec 18, 2009
Anyone who dislikes this film obviously didn't understand it's brilliance and they should be eugenized or have their kids exterminated to stop the flow of stupidity in society. Tell Ted K and the asshole from Chigo reader that im Anyone who dislikes this film obviously didn't understand it's brilliance and they should be eugenized or have their kids exterminated to stop the flow of stupidity in society. Tell Ted K and the asshole from Chigo reader that im gonna rape their wives and kill her with a giant dick statue just like my homeboy Alex did in the movie. Expand
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10
spacecaptainAug 4, 2011
My favorite movie of all time. One of Kubrick's masterpieces. Primarily, Malcolm McDowell's performance is not to be missed. In fact CO features a brilliant cast throughout. The script is still more innovative than anything to hit theMy favorite movie of all time. One of Kubrick's masterpieces. Primarily, Malcolm McDowell's performance is not to be missed. In fact CO features a brilliant cast throughout. The script is still more innovative than anything to hit the screen since. Walter Carlos's synthesizer score is exhilarating, and still sounds cutting edge. The cinematography and art director are absolutely first rate. 5 stars; 100%; the Real Deal. Expand
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10
AstronomyDomineJun 2, 2011
The best film I've ever seen. Definitely the best Kubrick movie...
Also noticed a lot of people saying to read the book beforehand or you won't understand it? I never read the book until a good 2 months after seeing the film and it made
The best film I've ever seen. Definitely the best Kubrick movie...
Also noticed a lot of people saying to read the book beforehand or you won't understand it? I never read the book until a good 2 months after seeing the film and it made perfect sense to me...
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10
Nrich46Jul 4, 2011
Kubrick's interpretation of Anthony Burgess's novel not only follows the plot nearly perfectly (the ending is changed to help market American audiences and to coincide with Kubrick's ideals) but, also, expresses all the ideas through a newKubrick's interpretation of Anthony Burgess's novel not only follows the plot nearly perfectly (the ending is changed to help market American audiences and to coincide with Kubrick's ideals) but, also, expresses all the ideas through a new medium. Brilliantly shot, wonderfully meaningful, and uniquely acted, "A Clockwork Orange" will grab it's audience and redefine any previous conceptions of film as art. This movie excels in Kubrick's ability to affect the audience; the shots, and images present in this film create direct discomfort in it's audience. This ability, which Kubrick mastered, helps make "A Clockwork Orange" a prominent movie in film history. Expand
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10
Mcc123May 17, 2012
My favorite movie of all time. It asks what i think is one the most important question of them all. Does society need to be changed before it gets out of control? And a clockwork orange answers that with an enthusiastic no. Their may beMy favorite movie of all time. It asks what i think is one the most important question of them all. Does society need to be changed before it gets out of control? And a clockwork orange answers that with an enthusiastic no. Their may be people in this world that are complete sociopaths, but they shouldn't be forced to be good. We deserve to make our own choices, and if we do wrong, then we suffer the consequences accordingly. Alex suffers, but he shouldn't be brainwashed into being something he's not. If we want to be good and grow as a society, we must make that choice ourselves. This movie is called "controversial" but all that means to me is that it has a very important lesson to teach us, and it does. Expand
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10
MattMintageJan 10, 2012
How can someone look at this Kubrickian masterpiece and call it trash? Clockwork has enough social, governmental, and psychological commentary packed in 1 1/2 hours of film than the entire new slop of "classics" that have come out in the pastHow can someone look at this Kubrickian masterpiece and call it trash? Clockwork has enough social, governmental, and psychological commentary packed in 1 1/2 hours of film than the entire new slop of "classics" that have come out in the past 20 years. Expand
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10
RodrigoBGCSep 26, 2011
There are no words that really can describe how good is this movie, Stanley Kubrick was a genius, each movie he made is just perfect, his camera work was just fascinating
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10
IcyGamesNov 29, 2011
A masterpiece, a cult hit, one of the most famous movies of all times. What more can you say? I mean how can you deny the power behind it? This is simply cinema at it's finest.
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8
geedupJul 17, 2016
Pretty dated by this time as far as storytelling, acting and pace, but many questions and lack of answers in this film are brought to light. They are still relevant. Love the use of slang words not in society at that time and the over the topPretty dated by this time as far as storytelling, acting and pace, but many questions and lack of answers in this film are brought to light. They are still relevant. Love the use of slang words not in society at that time and the over the top sexual references. After the film, if you cannot ID the purpose of the film which has been beaten over your head for over 2 hours, watch it again. Expand
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9
SpangleDec 2, 2013
Right when I thought I had seen the oddest film ever, a new contender comes along. Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange is extraordinarily weird, yet also brilliant. Not only is it beautifully filmed (as expected), but it raises numerousRight when I thought I had seen the oddest film ever, a new contender comes along. Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange is extraordinarily weird, yet also brilliant. Not only is it beautifully filmed (as expected), but it raises numerous cultural issues as well. Odd, elegant, violent, and brilliant, A Clockwork Orange is certainly a classic. Expand
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8
WaelOct 15, 2016
Really good adaptation. Taken word by word from the book (which marked me so much). Stanley's direction is fascinating and the acting is on point. I just wish it wasn't based on the American version of the book (which omits the last chapter).
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9
SwatiNov 12, 2013
Felt probably a bit over acted. There were some great scenes_ sometimes shockingly violent, other times downright hilarious. There was a fair amount of erotic nudity so be advised. But it also tended to drag a little bit. There was simply tooFelt probably a bit over acted. There were some great scenes_ sometimes shockingly violent, other times downright hilarious. There was a fair amount of erotic nudity so be advised. But it also tended to drag a little bit. There was simply too much extraneous detail. The score was lively. I think the lead actor did a wonderful job, if not the others. It was a satire of the modern age justice system where it prefers to mend the ways of hardened criminals instead of sticking it to them.

The dialogue was tailored to the circumstances and didn't feel natural. I watched it with an objective mind, as I watch everything else, but I couldn't shake the feeling toward the end that the audience was somehow required to feel bad for Alex as the society turned the tables on him. How he conveniently ran into the same people he had wronged in the course of a single day is beyond my tolerance for the device known as the suspension of disbelief, which is there to help enhance entertainment, not to infuriate by insulting people's intelligence. The worst part was that I predicted the ending precisely.

I just feel like documenting just the events of his life without the underlying moral of the story would have been a better way to go about it. And I seriously don't believe celebrating Alex's depraved urgings was very responsible. But I never hold it against a movie for doing that. If someone is attracted to crime by watching crime movies, it's hardly the director's fault. Everyone is responsible for their own actions. The plot, though, was sufficient for the story that they sought to tell.

I recommend that everyone watch this movie at least once. However, I can't say with certainty that I'm going to enjoy watching it again, for it's a bit long and there simply wasn't much going on to warrant such a length.
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10
dollarsignJul 15, 2016
wow************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
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9
SummersausageJan 6, 2013
Film at new heights! The story of a man's crazy life through a self centered narcissist who has no moral compass. Performances that are amazing and direction that makes you feel the power of the story!
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8
Movie1997Jul 25, 2015
In spite of the controversy that this movie presents, "A Clockwork Orange" is still an energetically electrifying film. What keeps this movie from feeling too focused on the controversy is the character of Alex (Malcom McDowell) and theIn spite of the controversy that this movie presents, "A Clockwork Orange" is still an energetically electrifying film. What keeps this movie from feeling too focused on the controversy is the character of Alex (Malcom McDowell) and the journey that he goes through. Alex DeLarge is probably my favorite character in a Stanley Kubrick movie. He is synical and monstrous, but at the same time you care about him. It's a back and forth relationship. You hate the character as a person because of the awful crimes that he commits, but when he is getting pushed around from not only the people trying to reabilitate him but by those he harmed earlier, you feel bad for him as a person as well. And of course, Malcom McDowell nails this character to a tithe. Aside from a fascinating lead you have a beautiful stylish setting a gripping moments that really put you to the test. It's also very thought provoking. And not in the way that's too ambiguous for its own good like "2001: A Space Odyessy". It questions views on society. And it shows that everyone and anyone can have a dark side when handling cert a in situations. You feel bad for one character when something bad happens to him/her, but when that same person strikes back you feel ashamed in their actions on dealing with a situation. As far as issues with the movie, there was one droog that gets literally no attention whatsoever. It should have just been three droogs rather than four. And it was a little slow at a couple of parts within the second act. Other than that, this movie is entertaining and engaging as hell, despite its controversy. I give this an A-! Expand
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10
P4DDDYApr 9, 2013
This is certainly Stanley Kubricks greatest film along with The Shining. Malcom Macdowell delivers an amazing act with a such brutal but likeable character. This film is one of the greatest cinematic experiences with a chilling start and aThis is certainly Stanley Kubricks greatest film along with The Shining. Malcom Macdowell delivers an amazing act with a such brutal but likeable character. This film is one of the greatest cinematic experiences with a chilling start and a warming end. 10/10! Expand
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9
TomBeltranMay 27, 2013
Posted on 5/23/13 10:17 AM
Coens struck a tense pitch black drama with this one lifted by performances all around one of the most tense films ever made
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10
manofthemoonJan 23, 2015
Kubrick's film version of Burgess' book asks what is worse? The violence of the individual or a society that turns the individual into something stripped of free will or thought? Provocative now as it was on release, "A Clockwork Orange"Kubrick's film version of Burgess' book asks what is worse? The violence of the individual or a society that turns the individual into something stripped of free will or thought? Provocative now as it was on release, "A Clockwork Orange" challenges the audience and provides a film that is unforgettable. Expand
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10
FranzHcriticMar 4, 2014
Off the bat, I can surmise this is Kubrick, with the camerawork and lighting effects. But what makes it so diametrically opposing to the sci-fi masterpiece '2001', is the social satire of violence and how it is "incurable", with norOff the bat, I can surmise this is Kubrick, with the camerawork and lighting effects. But what makes it so diametrically opposing to the sci-fi masterpiece '2001', is the social satire of violence and how it is "incurable", with nor possibility of reformation. This is, in essence, an ultra-violent manifestation and visualization of the phrase, "you are what you are". Malcolm McDowell's eerie and whimsical performance is one of the best I've seen from such a young actor then. Stanley Kubrick never stops to amaze. He truly is, one of the greatest. Expand
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10
TemeraireSep 19, 2013
This movie falls into the hit or miss category, either you'll love it or hate it.
In the futuristic world of a clockwork orange we meet Alex and his three friends that like to cause trouble at night to satisfy their inner need for violence
This movie falls into the hit or miss category, either you'll love it or hate it.
In the futuristic world of a clockwork orange we meet Alex and his three friends that like to cause trouble at night to satisfy their inner need for violence and self pleasure, and this is where the hit or miss part really starts kicking in. The movie tries to make the viewer enjoy the violence, feel sophisticated, so if you repel the violence there really isn't much to enjoy and I see that. But for me personally it hit spot on, and in some cases it worked so well that when the movie was released some youth reenacted one of the less pleasant
scenes in real life (although that is quite unfortunate).

The story of the movie has us asking about human rights, individual freedom and if a criminal like Alex does even deserve it after all he's done, and at the end of the movie we're asked if it was good or not what had happened, I won't go into spoilers but it's a sort of yes/no question where we really need to look at the pros and cons of the situation to figure out of it was right or not.
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9
theunholymesiahSep 25, 2013
This would have to be the most graphic Kubrick film I've seen. It's not a pleasant ride. Some of the things you see are very disturbing and shocking. But it's a challenging film. It challenges a lot of things we assume. The main characterThis would have to be the most graphic Kubrick film I've seen. It's not a pleasant ride. Some of the things you see are very disturbing and shocking. But it's a challenging film. It challenges a lot of things we assume. The main character turns from a total into a really sympathetic character we root for. It's disturbing but also thought provoking. Some people may not understand it but it's a standout film. Expand
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10
JQLeitchDec 19, 2015
One of my favourite films. Outstanding acting and after reading the novella, it perfectly captures it. Captures the disturbance of Alex and his "droogs". The soundtrack is also amazing.
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10
SmagsJan 11, 2014
Rape. Murder. Drugs. Singing in the Rain. Droogs. Milk. Bars. Government corruption. Free Will. Beethoven. Nothing more can be asked to create a movie more memorable, classic, and legendary than this, "A Clockwork Orange".

In the Kubrick
Rape. Murder. Drugs. Singing in the Rain. Droogs. Milk. Bars. Government corruption. Free Will. Beethoven. Nothing more can be asked to create a movie more memorable, classic, and legendary than this, "A Clockwork Orange".

In the Kubrick classic, "A Clockwork Orange" exemplifies itself from most other movies, in that it begs the viewer to ponder the question as to whether it is morally just for the government to intervene and condition members of society stripping their free will in order to benefit themselves. The movie ultimately proves that nothing, even with the best of conditioning, can take away the free will of any man and what he feels within his heart and soul.

While this movie is often scoffed at and disregarded as a movie of poor taste, "A Clockwork Orange" is a film that prevails in establishing itself as a monumental statement in cinema. Despite the love and hatred this movie receives, there is no denying that everyone who sees the film leaves with a fantasizing love for the Ninth Symphony. In conclusion, "A Clockwork Orange" is a beautiful and perfect masterpiece that deserves to be recognized and regarded as not only a classic of our time, but also the prime example of how a movie should be directed and executed. 10/10. Collapse
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10
BrettTJun 8, 2014
One of Kubrick's best films, and based on one of my favorite novels, A Clockwork Orange not only delivers great visuals and great acting, but characters so vile they sadly feel real.
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9
xaleberApr 27, 2015
A poetic study of violence and what makes us humans, A Clockwork Orange is masterful work of art that ranks as his (Stanley Kubrick) second best film, following 2001
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10
JohnMasterLJul 20, 2015
A Clockwork Orange es brillante, hermosa, divertida, cruda e impactante. La película mas polémica de Kubrick es sin duda alguna una obra de arte, visualmente perfecta, y las actuaciones son excelentes (Malcolm McDowell es increíble) una obraA Clockwork Orange es brillante, hermosa, divertida, cruda e impactante. La película mas polémica de Kubrick es sin duda alguna una obra de arte, visualmente perfecta, y las actuaciones son excelentes (Malcolm McDowell es increíble) una obra visual totalmente épica. Expand
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10
andrebarrosoDec 20, 2014
Stanley Kubrick's most controversial picture, "A Clockwork Orange" is more then pure sex on the screen.
Kubrick's marvelous screenplay shows to the audience several critics about nowadays society. Sexism, corruption, ignorance and anarchism.
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10
CineFilesApr 29, 2015
Throughout his 50-year career, and especially in his great films, director Stanley Kubrick had a penchant for taking the novels of others and re-shaping them to fit his own vision. Of the 16 movies Kubrick directed (including his finalThroughout his 50-year career, and especially in his great films, director Stanley Kubrick had a penchant for taking the novels of others and re-shaping them to fit his own vision. Of the 16 movies Kubrick directed (including his final feature, Eyes Wide Shut), the film maker was credited with script involvement in 12 of them. For that reason, 2001 is not referred to as "Arthur C. Clarke's 2001" but as "Stanley Kubrick's 2001." Dr. Strangelove is "Kubrick's Strangelove" not Peter George's. The motion picture version of The Shining owes a greater debt to the director than to author Stephen King. Similarly, the driving force behind A Clockwork Orange was more Kubrick than novelist Anthony Burgess.

One of the first things that will strike anyone watching A Clockwork Orange today is how thoroughly modern it looks. If not for the presence of the youthful face of established thespian Malcolm McDowell, one could be forgiven the assumption that the movie was made far more recently than 1971. Unlike many of its contemporaries, A Clockwork Orange is in no way dated, and the issues it addresses are as urgent today as they were three decades ago. How many other films from the early '70s can make this statement?

Part of the reason for the movie's contemporary look is Kubrick's forward-thinking philosophy of film making. From Lolita onwards, the director pushed the envelope. (In fact, one could argue that he did it before the 1962 film - overtly homosexual scenes from Spartacus were cut at the studio's insistence.) While human nature may not have changed since 1971, motion picture standards have. There is copious nudity, sex, and violence in A Clockwork Orange. And, while the sex is not pornographic and the violence is not explicit, they were pervasive enough to initially earn the movie an X rating. Today, the saltier elements of A Clockwork Orange fall into the mainstream of the MPAA's R category (and the film has since been re-classified as such).

A Clockwork Orange is not an easy motion picture to absorb or digest. Oddly, the sex and violence are easier to take than the razor-sharp edge of Kubrick's satire and the corresponding awareness of its pinpoint accuracy when addressing the issue of the dehumanization of people. As I write this in 1999, the extremities of A Clockwork Orange have not come to pass, but society is slowly moving down the slippery slope that the movie cautions against. I have the disturbing feeling that if the solution to crime proposed by the film (brainwashing) was medically and economically feasible, the government would leap onto the bandwagon. When one character speaks of our willingness to "sell liberty for a quieter life," it strikes an ominously familiar chord. Under its current mayor, New York City has yielded numerous freedoms in return for a reduction in the crime rate. And in Russia, the famished citizens would give up all their newly acquired rights for the promise of full bellies.

Distinct images often play a significant part in Kubrick's films. After all, 2001 was essentially one memorable image after another. A Clockwork Orange doesn't offer the same kind of visual kaleidoscope, but it has its moments. One is of four crucified Christ statues positioned so that they appear to be in a chorus line. Another features Alex on the attack with a giant sculpture of a penis. A third is the infamous "Singin' in the Rain" rape scene, where Alex mimics Gene Kelly while assaulting a woman. And a fourth is the climactic tableau with the media taking photographs of the Minister of the Interior and a bedridden Alex.

It is difficult to rank A Clockwork Orange in Kubrick's body of work. Its look and approach are unique, but not as visionary as 2001. It's tone is bitingly satirical, but it's not as corrosive as Dr. Strangelove. Few, however - even the movie's critics - would debate that it leaves a forceful impression, and, when you study the reason for that, you uncover the evidence of genius. A Clockwork Orange has a universal message. Admittedly, it's one that many would prefer not to hear, but to deny the importance of its central themes or to dismiss the movie as a descent into debauchery is to ignore both an artistic achievement and a cautionary tale. A Clockwork Orange is not a pretty or comfortable experience. It does not pander to the crowd-pleasing mentality that shapes the structure of many films. (In that scenario, a Rambo-like Alex would have avenged himself upon all of his wrongdoers in the final fifteen minutes.) But it demands thought, compels the attention, and refuses to be dismissed. And, for that reason, A Clockwork Orange must be considered a landmark of modern cinema.
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10
smartmartOct 3, 2015
A cinema classic, one of the most intense and beautiful dramatic films of all time! at times horrific, at others darkly funny, "A Clockwork Orange" is a genius film from a genius filmmaker. Disturbing and unsettling, but always intriguing, aA cinema classic, one of the most intense and beautiful dramatic films of all time! at times horrific, at others darkly funny, "A Clockwork Orange" is a genius film from a genius filmmaker. Disturbing and unsettling, but always intriguing, a true marvel! Expand
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10
tobinISawesomeNov 11, 2015
now its not like this review is worth a damn now that its over 40 years old. but im here because im a smart 15 year old who loves a good movie and art and im really tired of critics saying that people my age can only enjoy movies like jackassnow its not like this review is worth a damn now that its over 40 years old. but im here because im a smart 15 year old who loves a good movie and art and im really tired of critics saying that people my age can only enjoy movies like jackass and project x and i do like those movies but i really like this movie and its deep messages. there is wonderfull things about a clockwork orange even though the subject matter is ugly! the story follows alex and his 3 droogs (friends) as they do awfull things to people through the young night after going to far and accidentally killing someone he is sent to prison for life. but there was hope for him as a new thing called the ludivico treatment comes along and after alex is sent to experience that treatment he is sent back home and is left a victim of his previously committed crimes by the towns people! now you may wonder what any of this has to do with oranges and what clockwork orange is is alex he was something organic like an orange and turned into something not organic like a machine through his treatment taking away his freedom of choice causing you to feel bad for him even though he is bad! this movie is a strong complex social commentary with rad music and awesome acting ok so quit saying that a teen only likes stupid mindless movies like jackass a teen can like a strong complex movie as well. this movie is one of the very best movies ever made! Expand
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8
EpicLadySpongeApr 25, 2016
Definitely not suitable for those who can't handle a single minute of this movie. If you ask me, this is like rated X for its time and even then, it's still aged great.
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10
ElectroNickApr 13, 2016
Very few films are as daring in subject manner as Kubrick's masterpiece. This adaptation of the best-selling novel dares to tackle uncomfortable issues that very few films than and now would tackle. It mainly accomplishes this with theVery few films are as daring in subject manner as Kubrick's masterpiece. This adaptation of the best-selling novel dares to tackle uncomfortable issues that very few films than and now would tackle. It mainly accomplishes this with the portrayal of the main character Alex. Alex is not your typical teenage protagonist as he murders people in cold blood and even rapes women in his past time. But yet, the society that tries to correct him is just as corrupt and evil as he is. This raises the question of why Alex acted this way in the beginning of the film because is that his true nature or did the world he grew up in make him this way. Corruption is an important theme of the film including the desecration of art and the fact that sex is used as a weapon in many times of the film. Even innocent things such as milk is corrupted with drugs to corrupt the youth instead of nourishing them. It even deals with the never ending cycle of revenge as explored with Alex's suffering after the supposed "cure". The scene that shows this concept was when he was beaten alive by the homeless man that he beaten near to death earlier in the film as he describes that the younger generation always pays for the sins of the older generation. It even shows the dangers of the potential rise of fascism that could arise at anytime. If you want a more detailed analysis I highly recommend watching the Renegade Cut episode of this film. This is an accomplishment in filmmaking that could only be achieved from a mind as complex as Kubrick's. Expand
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9
sorastrife2890Jun 10, 2016
a master work of stanley kubrick. the movie have just a few little fails but in the rest is an excelent movie who all that are reading this must see. but i´m warning that this movie is very hard to see. it´s not for everyone
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8
BroyaxJan 10, 2017
Un film qui fait toujours réfléchir des décennies plus tard et dont l'mpact est toujours à la fois intrigant et énigmatique. L'ironie mordante de Kubrick, son cynisme transparaissent dans chaque plan, chaque dialogue et sonnent comme desUn film qui fait toujours réfléchir des décennies plus tard et dont l'mpact est toujours à la fois intrigant et énigmatique. L'ironie mordante de Kubrick, son cynisme transparaissent dans chaque plan, chaque dialogue et sonnent comme des interrogations et des questionnements qui résonnent dans le vide d'une société déliquescente, celle du début des années 70, prémisses de notre société actuelle et présente avachie dans l'angélisme forcené dont le caractère délétère fait des ravages.

A cet égard, il s'agit d'un film visionnaire sur la problématique de la violence et de la façon d'y faire face ou de se voiler la face. C'est aussi du point de vue moral l'éternelle question de la nature de la violence et de l'origine du comportement des "gens méchants", doux euphémisme pour désigner les raclures et autres racailles qui se nourrissent de la société et la mangent comme des parasites dont on ne parvient jamais à se débarrasser.

Orange Mécanique, plutôt que de se hasarder dans quelques réponses ou thèses hasardeuses, ne donne et ne donnera aucune réponse, aucune solution : le problème reste entier et le constat amer. Tout comme aujourd'hui.

Si son impact reste intact, c'est bien entendu grâce à la réalisation magistrale d'une part, grâce aux acteurs criants de vérité d'autre part, avec en première place l'incroyable Malcolm MacDowell dont la performance maléfique est à marquer d'une pierre blanche.

L'atmosphère vulgaire, le décorum kitsch, le mauvais goût étalé poussé à son paroxysme des années 70 sert naturellement le propos à merveille alors que pardoxalement, le film n'en apparaît que plus daté, désuet et caricatural. Le massacre des mouvements de la symphonie de Beethoven à l'orgue Bontempi de Prisunic participe de cette ironie cinglante et vrille les nerfs à souhait tandis que d'autres morceaux connus de musique classique illustrent les évènements ici et là, une manie de Kubrick qui se trouve quelque peu en porte-à-faux ici.

Le film en ferait-il trop ? on peut légitimement se le demander. Pourtant le dialecte quasi-incompréhensible de la vermine décrite ici peut aisément se comparer avec le "verlan" et les expressions de nos chers jeunes des banlieues, comme autant de signes d'appartenance, autant langagières que vestimentaires, à un "monde" à part, reflet d'une société malade ou reflet d'une résistance diabolique à son encontre.

Notez à cet égard qu'on peut rapidement partir dans tous les sens, y compris dans le religieux avec tous les dégâts collatéraux de part et d'autre, aussi bien du côté de nos chers rebuts que du côté de nos politiques qui semblent comme de coutume toujours désemparés face à l'ampleur du problème. Car la morale a une origine religieuse, tout comme le "bien" et le "mal".

On pourrait encore tergiverser et palabrer pendant des paragraphes entiers qu'on se retrouverait toujours au même point ; si un dessin vaut mieux qu'un long discours, alors un film tel qu'Orange Mécanique vaut bien une messe. Malgré son outrance et sa désuétude, malgré ses tics, le film a su se hisser hors de son temps : il est devenu à notre grand étonnement un classique intemporel.
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8
Kevin41Jan 6, 2017
The most shocking Kubrick’s film, merciless indictment against the wickedness of man and society. A film without hope. A story in which in noone of the characters you can find something positive. Who is more guilty? Alex “the droog” or theThe most shocking Kubrick’s film, merciless indictment against the wickedness of man and society. A film without hope. A story in which in noone of the characters you can find something positive. Who is more guilty? Alex “the droog” or the “society” that is around? Expand
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