User Score
6.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 50 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 34 out of 50
  2. Negative: 6 out of 50

Review this movie

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling
  1. Sep 1, 2014
    4
    A promising story through and through. Albert Nobbs recklessly uses its source material and fails to gain any confidence throughout. Glenn Close is average-at-best in her debut transvestite performance.
  2. Dec 7, 2012
    5
    Let me begin by saying I really enjoyed the film a lot. Glenn Close and Janet McTeer are fantastic as women living double lives as men; I'm very happy that they received Oscar nominations last year because they delivered two of the finest performances of 2011. Albert Nobbs does have some major issues however, but it's worth mentioning that it's hard to determine what could have made it better. The biggest problem I had with the film was that it was not as powerful or emotionally resonant as it could/should have been. I also didn't think Mia Wasikowska and Aaron Johnson were that great which surprised me because they're rising stars. Overall though I think Albert Nobbs is worth the watch; the characters are touching and the lead performances are remarkable. Expand
  3. Sep 22, 2012
    7
    An otherwise indifferent film is made memorable with yet another career defining performance by Glenn Close. And even though the subject is interesting and the supporting cast also do an excellent job, the film never really becomes truly great.
  4. Jun 25, 2012
    6
    The movie is so quiet and reserved that it almost seems to fade away altogether. The premise of the story was actually quite fascinating, but the fast pacing and short film length detract from the lasting impact of the film. The film really ended before it even began. It could have delved so much deeper into the topic of repression and abuse, which is what I hoped for, but it didn't (which makes that a huge, missed opportunity). That opportunity was replaced by a lingering cruelness that lasted the entire length of the film, which in the end made the film very tragic and heartbreaking. You really root for Albert during the film. You want him to succeed and be happy, but the circumstances he puts himself in makes it almost painful to watch. Oh and on another note, after the film ends, you'll want to strangle that devil-mistress of the hotel until she dies. Janet McTeer did some really wonderful acting, however. Glenn Close is a little bit harder to critique since her character was so unobtrusive. Expand
  5. May 25, 2012
    2
    Claustraphobic. There is a limited richness to this period piece but the film feels claustraphobic. Silas Marner does drag. The worst performance from Glenn Close. An incredible performance by Janet McTeer. Nearly two hours of boredom.
  6. Mar 30, 2012
    7
    A Febiofest screening, it is a quirkily deployed Ireland period homosexuality drama centers on a man-guised woman serves as a waiter in a hotel. (Glenn Close is the one holding the reins, leading star, co-producer, co-writer, co-songwriter, not to mention she has already won a Tony award for the same role way early in 1982 from its Broadway rendition, director Rodrigo García, also is Closeâ Expand
  7. Feb 6, 2012
    5
    The "uncanny valley" is a robotics/animation term that describes the subtle area between looking human and looking creepy. That's where Glenn Close resides in this film. She plays a woman who lives as a man to make a living in 19th century Ireland, but the peculiar makeup is never convincing. Ironically, Janet McTeeer, who also plays another woman-as-a-man, easily passes. If you look pass this technicality, you'll find a quiet, sad film about a quiet, sad person who's trying to cope with her unusual existence. There's a solid supporting cast and some enjoyable subplots, but the deliberate pacing prevents the film from ever building up much steam. Well-crafted in the "Masterpiece Theatre" style, but insignificant and predictable in the drama. Expand
  8. Jan 31, 2012
    6
    When men dress up as women in the movies, it is almost always in a comedy or farce; think Some Like It Hot, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, and Tootsie. However, when the situation is reversed and the film concerns women dressing up as men, the movie is habitually a drama bordering on tragedy: Yentl, Boys Donâ
  9. Jan 28, 2012
    9
    Albert Nobbs is the most heartbreaking and touching film I have seen in years. I disagree with much of what some critics are saying - I was never ever bored, found the drama tense and compelling, subtly building a sense of dread about what might be about to happen. The scene on the beach - Albert's one moment of true freedom, brought tears. Glenn Close is the master of this drama, not Janet McTeer, as some are saying. To me she simply added some comic relief, and was, at most, a cartoon. See it, you will love it. Expand
  10. Jan 10, 2012
    7
    Having for decades disguised herself as a man while working as a butler in a posh 19th-century Dublin hotel, a woman calling herself Albert Nobbs reconsiders her charade when a handsome painter arrives on the scene.
  11. Jan 5, 2012
    1
    very disappointing movie. Story feels incomplete and unfulfilling. Could have explored era issues of cross dressing,gay marriage and second class women with far more depth and interest., Other plot line also shallow.
    Glenn Close for oscar Nomination .Not comparable to Meryl Streep in Iron Lady
  12. Jan 3, 2012
    8
    The two fascinating things to expect in this movie is the nomination-worthy act of Glenn Close and Janet McTeer, and the Make-up. Otherwise, the story is slightly drugging. You'll keep waiting if Close's character will finally turn into her real gender identity. movienotesbook.blogspot.com
  13. Jan 2, 2012
    3
    Do not waste your time or money. This sluggish and pointless movie is a waste of all the talents involved. Close gives a very internal and subtle performance, but she just looks odd with the make up and prosthetics
  14. Dec 26, 2011
    4
    Albert Nobbs feels like a forgotten film, that was dusted off and pulled straight from the 90's (no offense to the 90's). The premise of a woman taking extreme measures to survive in the World is an intriguing one, but the writers, director (and whoever else had creative input) went absolutely no where with it. The love triangle was trite and the film itself was tonally void. The movie starts of well with establishing plot and character, but spirals down to blatant predictability, and something absurdly anti-climatic. Glenn Close seems to be heading for an undeserved Oscar nomination for her stiff performance as Nobbs 'himself', and an even worst nomination for the song she wrote for the film. I must admit McTeer did good work with what she was given, but the movie falls flat. It wasn't necessarily awful, but it was very unimportant, and incredibly ordinary. Expand
  15. Dec 24, 2011
    5
    It is designed to be a Glenn Close vehicle but Janet McTeer emerges as the real star. I wouldn't be surprised if, for this film, she becomes the Oscar winner that she should have been for "Tumbleweeds."
Metascore
57

Mixed or average reviews - based on 42 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 42
  2. Negative: 3 out of 42
  1. Reviewed by: Matt Mueller
    Apr 16, 2012
    40
    Good performances, but it's difficult to give two hoots about Close's passion project when the story remains as pinched and hermetic as poor little Albert Nobbs himself.
  2. Reviewed by: Kate Taylor
    Feb 2, 2012
    75
    The film surrounding the performance is not always as strong, but the centre holds, and magnificently so.
  3. Reviewed by: Anthony Lane
    Jan 30, 2012
    40
    Imagine a different film on a similar theme, with Hubert moved to center stage and García replaced by Pedro Almodóvar, for whom cross-dressers in a Catholic country would be meat and drink. Poor Albert could then retreat into the shadows, where he so evidently belongs, emerging only to pour the wine and clear away the feast.