Miramax Films | Release Date: February 11, 2005
7.4
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 61 Ratings
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Positive:
48
Mixed:
1
Negative:
12
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5
ovi_bzJan 8, 2011
Poor movie. Not so good mix between Jane Austen and Bollywood.
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6
MarkB.Apr 21, 2005
Apparently the Jane Austen movie boom of about ten years ago still has a little spark left (much to the consternation of husbands and boyfriends who keep getting dragged by their mates to see or rent Sense and Sensibility) so, hey, if Amy Apparently the Jane Austen movie boom of about ten years ago still has a little spark left (much to the consternation of husbands and boyfriends who keep getting dragged by their mates to see or rent Sense and Sensibility) so, hey, if Amy Heckerling could transform Emma into a thoroughly delightful modern-day high school flick, why SHOULDN'T Gurinder Chadha reinterpret Pride and Prejudice as a big, splashy Bollywood musical? The results are colorful, to be sure, and certainly not boring, but mixed at best: the song-and-dance numbers, with a couple of exceptions such as the very funny "No Life Without Wife", begin to look and sound alike after awhile. (The entire-cast finale of this one, in fact, reminded me of the entire-cast finale of From Justin to Kelly. Not a great sign!) The marriageable Indian sisters, led by Aishwarya Rai, are pleasant and work well together, but their casting is problematic on a different level: Chadha makes the interesting point in the dialogue that Westerners who visit India aren't really interested in seeing the "real" India, but in casting conventionally pretty-to-Western-eyes actresses who aren't exotic-looking at all, but resemble dark-haired American beauties with great tans, she undercuts her own argument. Martin Henderson, as the Westerner that Rai not too surprisingly hates at first sight, is hopelessly bland and wooden; if he hadn't previously starred in Torque, I would've suspected that he earned extra spending money as Paul Walker's stand-in in the Fast and the Furious movies. The single best reason to see this movie is to thoroughly treasure the performance of Nitin Ganatra as Mr. Kohli, an initially buffoonish, overly Americanized native who returns home to find a wife. He may be vulgar, materialistic, and talk with his mouth full, but Ganatra makes him so cheerful, endearing and downright charming in spite of it all that I was thrilled and thankful that he's not tossed outright on the Ralph Bellamy reject pile. Otherwise, B & P seems aggressively determined to do for Bollywood epics what Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West did for spaghetti westerns and Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon did for medieval martial-arts dramas: namely, not only be the definitive genre example, but the definitive WESTERNIZED genre example. The trouble with Chadha's attempt is that, unlike Leone's and Lee's, the effort and strain are all too obvious. Now that spring is here, a baseball analogy seems in order: while Chadha's previous multicultural charmers What's Cooking and Bend It Like Beckham were solid triple-baggers, Bride and Prejudice swings too hard...and misses. Expand
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