Metascore
61

Generally favorable reviews - based on 20 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 20
  2. Negative: 2 out of 20
  1. Reviewed by: Joe Williams
    Oct 21, 2011
    75
    In place of a rousing adventure, Blackthorn is a haunting ode.
  2. Reviewed by: Mick LaSalle
    Oct 13, 2011
    75
    Blackthorn imagines a scenario for Butch's later years and gives us a different kind of Western - somber, reflective and set in the elevated plains and salt flats of Bolivia.
  3. Reviewed by: Steven Rea
    Oct 13, 2011
    75
    Watching Shepard work his pony down a snaking mountain pass, playing a mandolin and singing the blues, or seeing him sitting, stone-still, beneath a railroad water tank, waiting for something to happen - these are scenes to be cherished, from an actor who has found the soul of the character he's playing.
  4. Reviewed by: Ty Burr
    Oct 13, 2011
    75
    Blackthorn is less interested in realism than in elegy, and in bringing this American folk hero in line with the Latin American places and people with whom he ended his days. Given a choice between the legend and the facts, Gil and Barros make up a new legend - and then gild it with light.
  5. Reviewed by: Lou Lumenick
    Oct 7, 2011
    75
    With Paul Newman gone, you couldn't ask for a better senior-citizen representation of Butch Cassidy than Shepard. In his best performance since "The Right Stuff'' turned him into a reluctant movie star, Shepard makes Blackthorn worth seeing.
  6. Reviewed by: Tasha Robinson
    Oct 5, 2011
    75
    Blackthorn could use more depth and less of a sense of weary inevitability, but it never lacks for the arid, vista-prone beauty of a classic Western, or for a sense of lived-in wear and tear that remains convincing even though it's more stylized than realistic.
  7. Reviewed by: Betsy Sharkey
    Oct 7, 2011
    70
    There is that allure of the Old West that is hard to resist, and there's plenty of grist in the story worth milling and mulling.
  8. Reviewed by: Mark Holcomb
    Oct 4, 2011
    70
    This modest oater should tickle western fans.
  9. Reviewed by: Frank Scheck
    Oct 2, 2011
    70
    The actor (Shepard) delivers a beautifully understated, world-weary turn that largely makes up for the slow-paced film's longueurs, and which in a better film could be described as iconic.
  10. Reviewed by: Ronnie Scheib
    Oct 2, 2011
    70
    Shepard delivers in spades, his character weary but just crackpot enough to survive.
  11. Reviewed by: Marc Savlov
    Oct 19, 2011
    67
    The film has a Leone eye (courtesy of cinematographer Juan Ruiz Anchía) coupled with a drowsy, doomy pace which, emboldened by the salt-licked Bolivian settings and the finely calibrated acting from all, makes for a phantasmagoric trip down a strangely different memory lane.
  12. Reviewed by: J.R. Jones
    Oct 13, 2011
    60
    Shepard is the whole show here, as weathered and elemental as the harsh Bolivian locations; the movie's best scenes are those that pit him against Stephen Rea as a former Pinkerton man who tracked the outlaws for years and can't believe Cassidy is still drawing breath.
  13. 60
    It's a trenchant modern western and fans of the genre should embrace it for more reasons than just the presence of the epic Sam Shepard who, by the way, owns this Butch Cassidy.
  14. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Oct 7, 2011
    60
    Director Mateo Gill's autumnal movie has elements of other late-era Westerns in its blood, but it isn't easily pigeonholed. There are shootouts and standoffs, as well as great scenes like one between the grizzled, perfectly cast Shepard and Rea discussing the cost of criminality and the changing morals of old men.
  15. Reviewed by: Eric Hynes
    Oct 4, 2011
    60
    Gil's alternative history gets one thing bang-on right: If Butch were to live into his senior days, he'd absolutely have to be played by Shepard. Wrinkled, leathery and densely carpeted in a salt-and-pepper beard, the 67-year-old playwright and actor still exudes intellectual mischief and hard-stare sex appeal; his self-styled ruggedness is a perfect match for an infamous gringo living incognito.
  16. Reviewed by: Shawn Levy
    Nov 19, 2011
    58
    The result is a handsome but deeply fractured tale.
  17. Reviewed by: Roger Ebert
    Oct 12, 2011
    50
    The first-time director is Mateo Gil, known for the screenplays of "Open Your Eyes," "The Sea Inside" and "Agora." Ironic, that the film's weakness is its screenplay.
  18. Reviewed by: Rachel Saltz
    Oct 6, 2011
    50
    The movie plods along self-consciously, and when the big twist occurs (you'll most likely see it coming), it complicates the plot, but not Butch, who remains a paragon. That's the problem with Blackthorn: it goes all mushy when contemplating its grizzled, out-of-time hero.
  19. Reviewed by: Michael O'Sullivan
    Oct 13, 2011
    38
    Blackthorn feels less like a proper sequel to "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," which it purports to be, than a coattail rider.
  20. Reviewed by: Nick Schager
    Oct 2, 2011
    38
    Blackthorn's last-man-standing circumstances, far from a cautionary tale about the cost of the gunslinger life, are glorified as the height of macho nobility.
User Score
6.9

Generally favorable reviews- based on 10 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 2
  2. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Oct 18, 2011
    4
    Butch Cassidy didnâ
  2. Feb 2, 2012
    7
    Great movie. Seeing as only a couple westerns in the past decade can even be considered decent, this was a real score. Too bad barely anyoneGreat movie. Seeing as only a couple westerns in the past decade can even be considered decent, this was a real score. Too bad barely anyone even knows it was made... Full Review »