Blue Car

User Score
7.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 10 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 10
  2. Negative: 1 out of 10
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  1. Droog
    Aug 6, 2003
    5
    Blue Car is one of those movies with incredible potential that manages to squander all of it. The concept is very good -- exploring the development of an illicit relationship between a young girl in need of a friend and an overly caring HS teacher. It certainly has its moments, and some of the dialogue is flat-out excellent. But Blue Car quickly becomes a train wreck of an after-school Blue Car is one of those movies with incredible potential that manages to squander all of it. The concept is very good -- exploring the development of an illicit relationship between a young girl in need of a friend and an overly caring HS teacher. It certainly has its moments, and some of the dialogue is flat-out excellent. But Blue Car quickly becomes a train wreck of an after-school special. Everything that could possibly go wrong in a young girl's life actually happens in this movie: suicide, homelessness, divorce, lack of love, etc., etc. There's even a none-too-subtle Christ figure in the film. Good God!! The main characters who start off so well developed become one-dimensional by the time the movie ends. This movie could really have been something special, but it ends up just a cliche. Expand
  2. StephenS.
    Nov 6, 2003
    6
    Rule 3: Avoid at all costs movies about writers, or writers mentoring writers, notably Finding Forrester. Rule 4: We always made an exception for Barton Fink, and we could almost do the same for Blue Car. Karen Moncrieff?s debut exhibits many likeable features of American indie film, if not the left-field sensibilities of some of its top directors. It is intrinsically interesting and Rule 3: Avoid at all costs movies about writers, or writers mentoring writers, notably Finding Forrester. Rule 4: We always made an exception for Barton Fink, and we could almost do the same for Blue Car. Karen Moncrieff?s debut exhibits many likeable features of American indie film, if not the left-field sensibilities of some of its top directors. It is intrinsically interesting and intimate, it is well-written and nicely acted, and the cinematography is generally effective but non-intrusive. Agnes Bruckner puts on a fine turn as Meg, would-be teenage poetess with a multiply disastrous home life being somewhat over-encouraged by her thoughtful English teacher Mr Auster (no, not that one). Meg?s eponymous poem, Blue Car, refers to her dad driving away and the broken feelings he left behind. Her mother is stressed out at work and her little sister is a psychiatric case. Only seemingly reliable Mr Auster continues to offer suave affection and correction over lunchtime sandwiches at school. There are perhaps a few too many angles for one story to fit plausibly into 96 minutes. But Moncrieff comes home strongly when she sends Meg off to Florida for her supreme poetry contest, and what happens there is a bit more like the messy and distasteful edges of life than the caramel centre of Hollywood. By the way, Lori Carson, the singer who once did transcendent work with Golden Palominos, graces the sound track. Expand
  3. ChadS.
    Sep 12, 2004
    7
    Mr. Auster (David Strathairn) is like Big John Harrigan (Brian Cox) from Michael Cuesta's "L.I.E."; a sexual predator who is hard to abhor outright, because like Cuesta, writer/director Karen Moncreiff explains Auster's predator self. So as it turns out, Meg (Agnes Bruckner) might not possess any literary talent, but ironically, her life is full of tragic real-life experiences Mr. Auster (David Strathairn) is like Big John Harrigan (Brian Cox) from Michael Cuesta's "L.I.E."; a sexual predator who is hard to abhor outright, because like Cuesta, writer/director Karen Moncreiff explains Auster's predator self. So as it turns out, Meg (Agnes Bruckner) might not possess any literary talent, but ironically, her life is full of tragic real-life experiences that would inform a budding poetess. "Blue Car" is interesting if you believe Mr. Auster's lie, because there's a silver lining to what happens to Meg's sister, if she is able to mine her crucible for art. When we learn the truth about this teacher, there's a re-mourning because Lily's act, which could've been perceived as a gift for Meg, was wasted, and in vain. It was a boon for Mr. Auster, however, because it meant entry into Meg's arms. Straitharn is excellent in making his exploitation of this girl seem less creepy than it really is. Like Big John Harrigan, we lose sight of the fact that he's probably a monster. "Blue Car" might be based on the affair between Julia Whelan and Eric Stoltz in the cancelled ABC drama "Once and Again". Lily was the name for Sela Ward's character. Expand
  4. BrianR.
    Nov 12, 2003
    9
    The movie kept my interest from start to finish. Go see it today.
  5. [Anonymous]
    Jun 19, 2003
    2
    I can't help but feel that this movie is a reflection of the process of making this movie, and that the positive reviews above stem from the reviewers guilt over their own temptations to use their positions of power to sexual advantage, just as the teacher does in the movie. Meg starts out weepy with a poem about how her dad betrayed her by leaving her and her mother and sister, and I can't help but feel that this movie is a reflection of the process of making this movie, and that the positive reviews above stem from the reviewers guilt over their own temptations to use their positions of power to sexual advantage, just as the teacher does in the movie. Meg starts out weepy with a poem about how her dad betrayed her by leaving her and her mother and sister, and stays weepy through a series of other betrayals and abandonments, until finally she gets really weepy about a really big one. I was ready to walk out after 15 minutes, but my companion wanted to stay in hopes it would get better, or at least go somewhere. It didn't. Expand
  6. KaleeB.
    May 21, 2004
    10
    Loved the movie, the poetry was beautiful and i could relate to the plot line.
  7. Heather
    Feb 27, 2007
    8
    I really enjoyed this film. It was brutally honest and kept you interested until the end. It's one of those movies that I still find myself thinking about several days later. Great acting!
Metascore
76

Generally favorable reviews - based on 31 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 31
  2. Negative: 0 out of 31
  1. 75
    Captures the complex dynamic of a mentoring relationship like few movies before it.
  2. Ms. Moncrieff's low-key directing is matched by fine acting from Agnes Bruckner as Meg and David Strathairn as her mentor. Aside from a somewhat schematic climax, this is as smart a debut as we've seen in a long while.
  3. This is a film without a single false note. From the rain-streaked windshield to the unaffected line readings from a stellar cast, there is not a shot in Blue Car that doesn't ring true.