Clerks II

User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 148 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 17 out of 148
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  1. Sep 7, 2011
    6
    This one made me laugh harder than it's predecessor, but less often. I feel like the artistic vision of the first movie was lost for more of gross-out comedy. Like I said, it did make me laugh, and it was worth the watch, but it's what you should expect from a sequel of a classic.
  2. AllistairP.
    Mar 6, 2007
    5
    This is closer to being Waiting 2 than it is Clerks 2. People who've liked the 90s Smith movies will find very little to like here, and if you're the type that gets easily annoyed at seeing beloved characters/franchises ruin you better stay away. Smith just totally lost touch of all that he had going for him with this movie and I'll be surprised if the man ever gets it back.
  3. MikeV.
    Dec 28, 2008
    4
    This movie would have been mildly funny if it weren't for the absolutely awful acting on the part of Dante and Randal. Perhaps the only reason I didn't notice how bad they both are in the first Clerks is because it was black and white and therefore more difficult to discern their expressions.
  4. BizzleFitz
    Jul 23, 2006
    5
    Clerks II (and Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back for that matter) is the proof in the pudding that money ruins talent. Kevin Smith forgot what funny was a long time ago. Any 13-year old kid could have written this movie. Don't get me wrong, I love the original Clerks and Randal is single-handedly one of the best cinematic characters ever created, so kudos Kevin Smith for getting Clerks II (and Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back for that matter) is the proof in the pudding that money ruins talent. Kevin Smith forgot what funny was a long time ago. Any 13-year old kid could have written this movie. Don't get me wrong, I love the original Clerks and Randal is single-handedly one of the best cinematic characters ever created, so kudos Kevin Smith for getting something right. But Smith has lost his edge. Dirty is no longer enough for us. After hearing F*CK 1000 in Jay and Silent Bob I want to hear a joke. A real joke. WIth timing and tension. Is that too much to ask? Clerks II fails on several levels; 1) Randal and Dante hate the customers, that's why we relate to them in the original. Where is the hate of consumers in CII? Where is the social commentary on how terrible we, as people who buy things daily, have become? 2) Smith expects us to find Randal as a pathetic, co-dependant thirty-something as endearing because he values friendship (insert sacharine here). I'm not buying it. That's not Randal. 3) Dante and Randal are not supposed to be friends with Jay and Silent Bob. Jay and Silent Bob are the antagonists for a reason. 4) Sappy ending. Clerks was about LIFE as a person coping with being normal. Clerks II is about a middle aged slacker revisiting his 15 minutes. Expand
  5. MarkB.
    Jul 25, 2006
    4
    Never mind that Kevin Smith's original, one-day-in-the-life-of-two-disgruntled-convenience-store-drones farce Clerks was about as grimy-looking a low budget film as anyone's ever made, or that it's painfully obvious that he cast the same few actors or crew members to play ALL the bit parts, or even that the continuity person was taking a few too many smoke breaks (that Never mind that Kevin Smith's original, one-day-in-the-life-of-two-disgruntled-convenience-store-drones farce Clerks was about as grimy-looking a low budget film as anyone's ever made, or that it's painfully obvious that he cast the same few actors or crew members to play ALL the bit parts, or even that the continuity person was taking a few too many smoke breaks (that 4-year-old girl in the movie bought the cigarettes a LOT earlier than 4 pm). What truly matters is that Smith's freshman film, a true diamond in the rough, was one of the three or four most convulsively, apoplectically hilarious comedies of the last 20 years, making the terms and expressions "milkmaid", "Chewlies" and "Happy Scrappy Hero Pup" instant comic buzzwords and "37" the funniest numeral in the Arabic counting system. 12 years later, Smith's sequel proves everything that Thomas Wolfe said about going home again to be absolutely accurate; the fact that Smith has a million times more facility with the camera and a kajillion times bigger budget does nothing to remove the disspiriting, slightly depressing aftertaste that this trip to Mooby's (the fictional fast-food joint that played a big role in Smith's Dogma) with Dante and Randal leaves behind. Even more frustrating are the 20 or so minutes of genuine entertainment value (out of 98) that Smith really DOES provide: every time Clerks II goes on without a laugh, a purpose or a point for what seems like forever, he blindsides you with a great bit like the Star Wars/ Lord of the Rings debate (guess who wins?) or Randal's outrageous, digging-himself-in-deeper attempt to defend a notorious racial epithet that at least for a few minutes brings back delightful memories of the good old black-and-white days at the Quik Stop. (And, it must be admitted, Smith's right about the big bachelor party climax featuring a guest entertainer who's really committed to, shall we say, making our relationship with our four-legged friends a bit more, uh, personal: you really CAN'T take your eyes off the screen, no matter how much you want to!) Rosario Dawson, as the Mooby's manager and Dante's friend-and-possibly-more, is so appealing and likable that it's no wonder she's placed front and center in the movie ad; unfortunately, Brian O'Halloran and a rather jowly Jeff Anderson as Dante and Randal just aren't the comic geniuses they once were--their rather desperate attempts to push the jokes brought back too many regrettable memories of Laurel and Hardy in their declining days. The worst aspect of Clerks II (even beyond the surprising lack of interaction with customers, the lame cameos by a couple of Smith alumni who made it big, or the Obligatory Music Videos of two, count 'em, two Number One hits--from 1970!!) is Smith's all-too-eager attempt to betray the subtle but solid point he made in the original: that whatever misfortunes that the perpetually put-upon sad sack dante suffered were his own fault for not taking charge of his own life and destiny. (His perpetual bleat, "I'm not even supposed to BE here!!" was the perfect illustration of this.) Smith inverts his original message with a patently desperate, phonily sentimental wrap-up that tries to sell us on the idea that the clerk biz was Dante's rightful place in life all along. If that's the case, that's truly sad, but not as much so as the quandary of a so-called independent filmmaker who, after trying to mature a bit and unsuccessfully take his audience on the jouney with him (with the delightful, vastly underrated Jersey Girl), scurries back to giving them What He Thinks They Want (including a completely fraudulent message) faster than Jerry Bruckheimer inked the papers to make Pirates of the Caribbean 2 and 3 after the original's first opening week. Come to think of it, it's not just sad...it's pathetic. Expand
  6. LarryH.
    Jul 26, 2006
    5
    The weakest of all of Kevin Smith's films. Yes, it was funny - in parts. This movie was about as sentimental as the American Pie movies. This movie does for friendship, what Jersey Girl does for parenting. Unfortunately, Smith is even more sappy in Clerks II than he was in Jersey Girl. He should have stopped with Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back. By the way, I am a fan of all of his The weakest of all of Kevin Smith's films. Yes, it was funny - in parts. This movie was about as sentimental as the American Pie movies. This movie does for friendship, what Jersey Girl does for parenting. Unfortunately, Smith is even more sappy in Clerks II than he was in Jersey Girl. He should have stopped with Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back. By the way, I am a fan of all of his movies, and love them all. Expand
  7. Guy
    Jul 28, 2006
    4
    The dialog was painful at times... not for its content, but for the way it was delivered. Just bad acting, actually. It seems so rehersed, and there are no pauses between lines. It comes off as being extrememly bad acting. You just can't picture these people saying these things in an actual conversation (so quickly) without pauses to think.
  8. Louis-JeanBOgEr
    Aug 7, 2006
    5
    Not too bad... for the 21st century's GEEKS.
  9. shawno.
    Dec 2, 2006
    6
    How this got high scores is beyound me. Its not bad, but the whole movie seems forced to be something its not. Its not Clerks 1, but tries, and its not a campy love story, but it tries. Evan the star wars vs lord of the rings debate feels forced and untimely. But I did laugh and enjoted parts of the moive, did have dull moments.
  10. WhitG.
    Dec 5, 2006
    4
    Kevin Smith has a way with words and the ability to create absurd yet believable situations, but even those strengths can't redeem the flatness and falsity of these characters or the fake reality that Smith has forced them to inhabit. And I must've missed the "heart" that supposedly exists at the core of Clerks 2. Maybe because it was one of those tiny pink candy hearts that Kevin Smith has a way with words and the ability to create absurd yet believable situations, but even those strengths can't redeem the flatness and falsity of these characters or the fake reality that Smith has forced them to inhabit. And I must've missed the "heart" that supposedly exists at the core of Clerks 2. Maybe because it was one of those tiny pink candy hearts that tastes like chalk and refined sugar, the kind that made you sick on Valentines Day when you were 8 years old. And you have to be about 8 to buy in to any of this typical Hollywood-style pseudo-romance, which is disappointing because there's a lot of critique of conventional romantic love coming out of the characters mouths but they contradict their words with their actions, and the ending is nothing less than American Dreamy. All that being said, If you can satisfy yourself with a few humorous rants on contemporary culture and a couple of good gags that elicit mild chuckles then the movie isn't a total loss, but don't expect any substance. In fact, if you load up on a substance (preferably herbal or alcoholic) then your chances of enjoying Clerks 2 would be greatly improved. Expand
  11. Jun 12, 2011
    5
    I really feel that Kevin Smith is over rated as a director. I liked Chasing Amy, dogma and mall rats but the clerks movie just don't do it for me. Its just to much potty humor for my taste.
  12. Nov 22, 2014
    6
    I can't say I enjoy this film as much as the first. I love all the banter between the characters. It reminds me of working at a minimum wage job myself but Randall and Dante just can't get away with as much after they have aged so much so that its a little less effective.
Metascore
65

Generally favorable reviews - based on 29 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 29
  2. Negative: 0 out of 29
  1. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    70
    A softer, flabbier and considerably higher-budgeted follow-up to Kevin Smith's 1994 indie sensation that nevertheless packs enough riotous exchanges and pungent sexual obscenities to make its 97 minutes pass by with ease.
  2. Reviewed by: Robert Wilonsky
    40
    Clerks II can't bear the strain of its amateur-hour theatrics, no matter how big its heart or how many crocodile tears it manages to squirt. The dramatic moments become melodramatic; the bawdy moments turn icky. The fans will eat it up.
  3. 67
    By this point, the rhythms of Smith's dialogue are as predictable and mannered as haikus, and like sitcoms, Clerks II is mostly appealing in its familiarity, from the rat-a-tat cussing to the cameos from Smith's repertory company to the extended riffing on "Star Wars" and geek culture.