User Score
6.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 22 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 22
  2. Negative: 8 out of 22

Review this movie

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling
  1. MinerW.
    Oct 13, 2002
    10
    I too did not really understand the film as Enoch previously stated but whoever put the sets together must be insane, they are totaly over the top, I would like to live in them. The only part I really didn't like was the music, it sucked. Whoever did it must suck also.
  2. PeterS.
    May 21, 2002
    10
    Ravishing cinematography. The Director of Photography is truly a genius! Never before have I ever seen such beauty on film. A visionary pioneer.
  3. JochenT.
    Sep 15, 2003
    9
    I am on a thin line with this film. It is purposely obscure with it's meanings, and it's a problem I have with a lot of contemporary art. A lot of art doesn't seem to deal with common language that is stated with complexity, which is upon to readings from any perceptive individual, but instead uses obscure symbols. I suppose in that light it makes sense that Barney's I am on a thin line with this film. It is purposely obscure with it's meanings, and it's a problem I have with a lot of contemporary art. A lot of art doesn't seem to deal with common language that is stated with complexity, which is upon to readings from any perceptive individual, but instead uses obscure symbols. I suppose in that light it makes sense that Barney's Cremaster films are so expensive to buy, because then they remain in the art world. Or are doomed, captured in the art world. A lot of the people I know who would actually think about art, instead of just jumping onto the badwagon for the latest piece of fashionable art, are poor S.O.B.s who only have the money to rent the latest Cronenberg or Lynch film. As it stands, Cremaster three is held at a distance by its price-tag. It does little to communicate its meanings to a large audience, but maybe gives the art the same lofty remoteness of people within the Masonic order, and maybe the elusiveness of the film contributes to its popularity. The film itself, as much as I understand its symbol set, revolves around Free-Masonry, and its images are related to rising through the order. I believe this includes the Scottish book-ends, since (as near as I've come to understand) Free-Masonry began in Scottland. If you want to understand the symbols used for the Enterred Apprentice section, reading up on the ritual for the initiation of the Entered Apprentice is probably a good start. Other than that, I thought it was pretty dope, and very beautiful. Very ornate in a contemporary way. His influences are obvious, but it didn't feel derivitive. He seemed pretty in control of them. Expand
  4. DowK.
    Nov 7, 2002
    10
    I agree with Matt W. and Peter S. that this is a visually stunning film. Miner W. also make a good point. The Principal Production Team, responsible fo the creation of the fantastic sets, must be the finest set builders in the world. Truly amazing work!
  5. MattW.
    May 25, 2002
    10
    I agree with Peter S. This film has some of the most amazing visuals I've ever seen. The visual effects supervisor, responsible for the films computer graphics, is obviously an unsung hero.
  6. SparklesM.
    Jul 31, 2002
    10
    What an interesting and beautiful film. Stunning visuals and the editing is sublime.
  7. Enochtheelder
    Aug 28, 2002
    10
    I didn't really understand it but the effects were cool and the camera work was really neat. What was that thing that came out of that guys butt, it looked like a shy miner. I will definetly rent this movie again!
  8. EricS.
    Sep 14, 2002
    9
    Through the course of the five Cremaster films, Matthew Barney has managed to create the most visualy stimulating and intellectualy entertaining spectical to date. Barney displays a distinct visual commentary on mankind's attempts and overall failures at control and creation. His mastered use of emphisises through repetition and strong imagery alone diserves the highest of ratings. Through the course of the five Cremaster films, Matthew Barney has managed to create the most visualy stimulating and intellectualy entertaining spectical to date. Barney displays a distinct visual commentary on mankind's attempts and overall failures at control and creation. His mastered use of emphisises through repetition and strong imagery alone diserves the highest of ratings. Barney's final Cremaster instalment focuses in on the settings of Ireland and early 20th century New-York, with heavy use of Mason symbols and phalic imagery he creates a three hour jaunt into a sculptured idea. This film is both dramaticly haunting and uplifting, the idea of the instinctive right yet failure to create and acheive greatness through set pattern (which this film aparently revolves apon) seems all but bulldozed in comparison to the film's overall granduer. Truly a peice of postmodern film which will be considered a masterpeice of an entire genre. Expand
  9. Elliott
    Nov 3, 2003
    9
    It is a remarkably beautiful film, filled with bizarre, occasionally horrific, images that stay with you long after the film is over. The scenes where the Chrysler Building was transformed into a giant maypole were particularly wonderful, and the set pieces were simply amazing. Cremaster 3 is the best of the series. It really is a masterpiece.
  10. LarsR.
    Jan 14, 2003
    10
    Cremaster 3 is a stunningly beautiful movie. I have never witnessed anything so orginal in my life. The movie had basically no dialogue and it kept my attention for three hours. I would love to see the rest of the Cremaster Series after watching Cremaster 3.
Metascore
67

Generally favorable reviews - based on 7 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. If Cremaster 3 is an innovative artwork that has been credited with breaking down the distance between sculpture and film, is it also a great movie? Probably yes.
  2. Reviewed by: Ken Fox
    80
    Barney has been criticized as willfully esoteric, but if traditional meaning is once again elusive in this film, it remains an enthralling aesthetic experience, one that's steeped in mystery and a ravishing, baroque beauty.
  3. Barney's cinematic art inspires both awe and revulsion, often simultaneously.