User Score
6.0

Mixed or average reviews- based on 24 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 24
  2. Negative: 7 out of 24

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  1. Dec 13, 2011
    3
    An inspiring well thought out film. To bad that's all it has going for it. Tyler Perry should stick to comedies, as if that still does him good. There was no real plot build-up to this one. Everything was also fasted pasted, which is not good for a movie that has a sub genre of drama. With poor performances by the cast there was no real emotion to this movie. And this is a movie that should have emotion. The fight scene at the end between Monty and the gangsters was laughable. Even thought this is a comedy I don't believe I was supposed to laugh at that scene. I would recommend this to women that basically would watch anything that would make them cry. Expand
Metascore
49

Mixed or average reviews - based on 17 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 17
  2. Negative: 1 out of 17
  1. Daddy's Little Girls may be heavy-handed and drearily predictable, but it also should connect with its core audience as solidly as Perry's previous efforts did, even if the drama is frequently just as over the top as its predecessors.
  2. Reviewed by: Peter Debruge
    60
    Chockfull of cathartic moments, Perry's storytelling is best when it defies convention. Like the black man's Frank Capra, Perry tells stories in which every conflict is a test of faith and every victory a testament to the American underdog. Instead of following the proven formulas of screenwriting books, he earnestly shepherds his own messy structure.
  3. Reviewed by: Mark Olsen
    50
    More surprising is Perry's inability to write back-and-forth dialogue with any real wit or verve. He is at his best when writing speeches, and some of the film's best moments come when Union is given snappy monologues on the state of contemporary relationships and African American maleness.