Metascore
51

Mixed or average reviews - based on 28 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 28
  2. Negative: 2 out of 28
Watch On
  1. 75
    Feast of Love's greatest strength is that it's about people and involves universal emotions. It's not great art but it is enjoyable soap opera.
  2. You'll find more authenticity listening in on conversations at your corner diner. But this is a gentler alternative, especially if you prefer your coffee with extra cream and sugar anyway.
  3. Most of the love in Feast of Love is unrequited, untapped, or unfulfilled. The fine cast, which includes Jane Alexander, Selma Blair, and Radha Mitchell, is also somewhat underused.
  4. Reviewed by: Claudia Puig
    63
    The story teeters on the edge of soap opera and emotional manipulation, but director Robert Benton (Kramer vs. Kramer) pulls back in the nick of time. What results is an involving and often poignant examination of love and loss.
  5. 63
    The bodies are athletic, young, and white, and yet this is not the sport sex we usually see in Hollywood movies. It's the sex of adulation. Sometimes the director Robert Benton goes heavy on the hydraulic positioning, but his movie is scarcely mechanical.
  6. As a meditation on the vicissitudes of love, on the need for people to connect, and the struggles that come by both making and missing those connections, the movie is wading-pool deep.
  7. Reviewed by: Ken Fox
    75
    Many of the script's observations sound as though they were lifted directly from the pages of Baxter's book, and they're too platitudinous to impart much wisdom to anyone who's been in and out of love at least once in his or her life. But it's nice to see these ideas played out by a fine cast.
  8. This heart-warmer by Robert Benton has some of the tender wisdom and humor of his other features (e.g., Nobody's Fool).
  9. 67
    Feast is set and was shot in Portland, and if nothing else it makes the case that we live in one gorgeous city.
  10. Reviewed by: Richard Corliss
    90
    Sexy, funny, sad and defiantly romantic, Feast of Love is the rare movie to cuddle up to.
  11. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    70
    Septuagenarian director Robert Benton brings his characteristically fine touch with actors and appreciation for the female form to this tastefully erotic ensembler, but compassion finally outstrips insight in a drama as soft-headed as it is soft-hearted.
  12. The film, with its intersecting vignettes, might ultimately feel like more of a sampler platter than a sustaining smorgasbord, but it's effectively rooted in a lovely Morgan Freeman performance.
  13. The multiple-story-line family drama is too cliche-ridden to be considered a great movie. But it's still a very good one, filled with excellent performances, entertaining writing and a final few scenes that are quite moving - even if you can see most of them coming at the end of the first act.
User Score
7.7

Generally favorable reviews- based on 13 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. PaulH.
    Mar 1, 2008
    10
    It's very sad this movie did find an audience. It is not a romantic comedy but it is a romance. Perhaps, one day, people will see this It's very sad this movie did find an audience. It is not a romantic comedy but it is a romance. Perhaps, one day, people will see this movie for what it is. . . an actual attempt to get to the heart of love without the happily ever after we've been force fed as the only kind of after that matters. Full Review »
  2. GerardZ.
    Sep 6, 2008
    4
    Unrealistic and gratuitous but you cannot help but enjoy Morgan Freeman. Also, there are no Deans of Philosophy.
  3. TomM.
    Aug 7, 2008
    8
    Unusual structure, unusual tale, appealing storyline, complex and distinctly human characters, fine performances by Morgan Freeman and the Unusual structure, unusual tale, appealing storyline, complex and distinctly human characters, fine performances by Morgan Freeman and the entire cast all combine to transform Charles Baxter's unusual novel into a winner once again as screenplay and film. Full Review »