Metascore
91

Universal acclaim - based on 10 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 10
  2. Negative: 0 out of 10
  1. Reviewed by: Justin Chang
    May 23, 2014
    100
    If the screenplay, by Dan Futterman (“Capote”) and E. Max Frye, is relatively spare in terms of dialogue, it’s satisfyingly rich and thorny in its conception of the tightly wound triangle at its center, while Miller’s direction evinces the same sustained intensity and consummate control of his material that defined his first two features.
  2. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    May 23, 2014
    100
    Mesmerizing in its incremental layering of a bizarre, tragic and thoroughly warped character study, Foxcatcher sees director Bennett Miller well surpassing even the fine work he did in his previous two films, Capote and Moneyball.
  3. Reviewed by: Robbie Collin
    May 23, 2014
    100
    Miller finds grand, America-describing themes in the interactions between these three men: the extraordinary influence of inherited wealth, the hunkered-down ambition of working-class athletes, the equation of material success with honour and moral rectitude.
  4. Reviewed by: Jessica Kiang
    May 23, 2014
    100
    With Foxcatcher, [Miller] has outdone himself, turning his uniquely meticulous eye to a tiny story in a totally rarefied, specific environment and through whatever alchemy he has perfected, created something so universal and resonant that it feels epic, sprawling, almost ancient in its mythic overtones. Foxcatcher is an enormous film.
  5. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    May 23, 2014
    100
    It is a gripping film: horrible, scary and desperately sad.
  6. Reviewed by: John Bleasdale
    May 23, 2014
    100
    Carell, in a rare but not unique departure into drama, proves himself as accomplished at tragedy as he is at comedy.
  7. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    May 23, 2014
    91
    Though anchored by a affecting and sullen turn by Channing Tatum, the movie derives its primary discomfiting power from Steve Carell in a revelatory performance as a monster of American wealth.
  8. Reviewed by: Jordan Hoffman
    May 20, 2014
    88
    Nothing short of fascinating.
  9. Reviewed by: Guy Lodge
    May 23, 2014
    83
    A sinuous, methodical true-crime drama in which the moral and psychological rot sets in long before any crime is committed.
  10. Reviewed by: Keith Uhlich
    May 23, 2014
    40
    Once Miller lays all his cards on the table, however, you realize you haven’t been watching people struggling with the very real temptations of unchecked privilege, so much as fumbling blindly in a glib, gloomy satire of American exceptionalism.

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