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47

Mixed or average reviews - based on 4 Critics What's this?

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7.5

Generally favorable reviews- based on 8 Ratings

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  • Summary: In the past 200,000 years, humans have upset the balance of planet Earth, a balance established by nearly four billion years of evolution. We must act now. It’s too late to be a pessimist. The price is too high. Humanity has little time to reverse the trend and change its patterns ofIn the past 200,000 years, humans have upset the balance of planet Earth, a balance established by nearly four billion years of evolution. We must act now. It’s too late to be a pessimist. The price is too high. Humanity has little time to reverse the trend and change its patterns of consumption. Through visually stunning footage from over fifty countries, all shot from an aerial perspective, Yann Arthus-Bertrand shows us a view most of us have never seen. He shares with us his sense of awe about our planet and his concern for its health. With this film, Arthus-Bertrand’s feature film directorial debut. Home the movie is carbon offset. All of the CO2 emissions engendered by the making of the film are calculated and offset by sums of money that are used to provide clean energy to those who don’t have any. For the last ten years, all the work of Yann Arthus-Bertrand has been carbon offset. (Europa Corp.) Expand
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  1. Reviewed by: Joe Neumaier
    Feb 4, 2011
    60
    More mournful than alarmist, Arthus-Bertrand's film goes beyond global warming to look at life out of balance, through a lens darkly.
  2. Reviewed by: Keith Uhlich
    Feb 1, 2011
    60
    We certainly need all the ecological jeremiads we can get. But must they be so numbingly pedantic?
  3. Reviewed by: Andrew Schenker
    Feb 1, 2011
    50
    While Close's testimony is sufficiently terrifying, moving toward an apocalyptic vision of climate-change catastrophe, the urgency of her tone is belied by the placidity of the film's visuals.
  4. Reviewed by: Jeannette Catsoulis
    Feb 3, 2011
    40
    We've heard it all before, if not in the schoolmarmish tones of Glenn Close, whose patronizing narration ("The earth is a miracle") makes the film feel almost as long as the life of its subject.
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